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Drug Laws

Comment 24th July 2010

 The probation and drug laws in Britain today are to protect our young and our society from the misuses of drugs. We must ask our self why is it then that in the last 80years of probation the age of drug users had gone down, number of user up, the number of dealers up and number of deaths up.

If we look closer it seems probation has the opposite affect it creates an international illegal industry worth billions which helps fund organized crime and terrorism along with the incarceration millions of their own citizens for simple possession.

I believe in adopting a new way to regulate, tax and control drugs we can allow people who choose to do an alternative drug to tobacco or alcohol can do so safely in the privacy of their own home or licensed premises, we stop the illegal drug trade, we can help stop the spread of diseases, we can stop the selling of these drugs to our young, we can also product a new industry and a greener economy with the production of hemp.

Nowadays it’s easier for the children of this country to get illegal drugs than alcohol and tobacco. WHY?

Because there regulated in a licensed premises which will not sell to under 18year olds and will ask for proof of id.

Why does this matter?

"He who believes in the Principle of Freedom yet is against illegal drugs must allow the user his freedom of choice whether that choice be right or wrong".

My idea is important because i believe in freedom for every human being

The misuse of drug act is a huge miss use of law as it restricts people liberty and freedom, I understand why some of the law is in place to protect our citizens but it has come the time where we really need to have a mature discussion about this, it now seems probation causes more harm to people’s lives then the drugs.

Addiction can be beat  –  Criminal record forever

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