Reinstatement of the principle of presumption of innocence

In recent years, especially during the 13 years of the last government, more and more new laws and amendments to existing legislation have come onto the statute book in a manner which requires an individual charged with, or even suspected of, committing an offence, having to prove his or her innocence, rather than retaining the fundamental right to be presumed to be innocent until such time as the reverse can be proven.

Why is this idea important?

In recent years, especially during the 13 years of the last government, more and more new laws and amendments to existing legislation have come onto the statute book in a manner which requires an individual charged with, or even suspected of, committing an offence, having to prove his or her innocence, rather than retaining the fundamental right to be presumed to be innocent until such time as the reverse can be proven.

Elimination of ContactPoint

The new coalition government has done well in abolishing the ID card scheme, however an equally insidious and vulnerable scheme by the name of ContactPoint is still in the works. This is far too intrusive, costly, and involves the garnering off far too much personal data about children in the U.K.  It is also selective insofar as the offspring of celebrities, politicians, and the wealthy are not to be included in the data, highlighting two major flaws, i.e. security concerns before the scheme is even off the ground (because the children of people in these "categories" are deemed to be more likely to be targetted by the villains among us, clearly implying that there are indeed worries about the ease with which data could be hacked); and the elitist nature of the scheme, whereby it is proposed that some are more important than others. ContactPoint is an unnecessary and Orwellian proposal which needs to be done away with, now.

Why is this idea important?

The new coalition government has done well in abolishing the ID card scheme, however an equally insidious and vulnerable scheme by the name of ContactPoint is still in the works. This is far too intrusive, costly, and involves the garnering off far too much personal data about children in the U.K.  It is also selective insofar as the offspring of celebrities, politicians, and the wealthy are not to be included in the data, highlighting two major flaws, i.e. security concerns before the scheme is even off the ground (because the children of people in these "categories" are deemed to be more likely to be targetted by the villains among us, clearly implying that there are indeed worries about the ease with which data could be hacked); and the elitist nature of the scheme, whereby it is proposed that some are more important than others. ContactPoint is an unnecessary and Orwellian proposal which needs to be done away with, now.