Should we legalise low-level drugs such as cannabis?

We all know that drugs, unless pharmaceutical, are usually bad for us. But you still drink, some of you still smoke. This is where drug dealers come in. They often sell cannabis for high prices compared to its actual value.

This high price often causes addicts to commit robberies or muggings to raise the money for their next 'hit'. The high value also increases the likelihood of violence between gangs and dealers.

But, let's just say, what if the market were to disappear. Supply and demand, the basis of Capitalism, states that without a market, the value plummets, even faster than BP's shares. Without the changing of hands of large quantities of money, gangs would be far less likely to flair up into violence, as they would have no high-value assets to protect.

The way to remove the market from back-alley dealers is to legalise Cannabis. I have never smoked any substance in my life, but I do strongly believe in this method. If, like in Amsterdam, Cannabis were to be sold in heavily regulated establishments, with relatively high taxes on it to fund extra healthcare, but not as high a price as the illegal sellers, the addicts would be confined into regulated spaces and would, if they were to become violent, only harm each other.

Granted, the Western World's problem with drugs will never disappear, but if we were to confine and regulate the problem, surely that is better than what we have now.

Also, yes, Cannabis has been proven to, in some cases, lead to Neural disorders such as Psychosis and Schizophrenia, but luckily this is rare and containable.

Take Alcohol for example, the use of which causes far too many deaths and violent acts each year. Alcohol is legal, yet if you were to walk into any Hospital's A&E Department between 10pm and 4am on a Friday or Saturday, you would wonder how it is still legal. Alcohol costs the NHS millions, possibly billions, each year, far more than most other drugs put together.

Also, taking violence into account, if you are at a concert or sports event, and a man starts to become violent and aggressive, is he drunk or has he been smoking Cannabis?

On top of this, I, along with many others, would agree that users of Cannabis should not be allowed to waste NHS funds and so treatment for drug-related problems should be allowed to be denied by the Doctor asked to perform the aforementioned treatment.

In short, the legalisation, but heavy taxing, of Cannabis could be a good thing for our country as a whole, as Cannabis tends to make people relaxed.

Why is this idea important?

We all know that drugs, unless pharmaceutical, are usually bad for us. But you still drink, some of you still smoke. This is where drug dealers come in. They often sell cannabis for high prices compared to its actual value.

This high price often causes addicts to commit robberies or muggings to raise the money for their next 'hit'. The high value also increases the likelihood of violence between gangs and dealers.

But, let's just say, what if the market were to disappear. Supply and demand, the basis of Capitalism, states that without a market, the value plummets, even faster than BP's shares. Without the changing of hands of large quantities of money, gangs would be far less likely to flair up into violence, as they would have no high-value assets to protect.

The way to remove the market from back-alley dealers is to legalise Cannabis. I have never smoked any substance in my life, but I do strongly believe in this method. If, like in Amsterdam, Cannabis were to be sold in heavily regulated establishments, with relatively high taxes on it to fund extra healthcare, but not as high a price as the illegal sellers, the addicts would be confined into regulated spaces and would, if they were to become violent, only harm each other.

Granted, the Western World's problem with drugs will never disappear, but if we were to confine and regulate the problem, surely that is better than what we have now.

Also, yes, Cannabis has been proven to, in some cases, lead to Neural disorders such as Psychosis and Schizophrenia, but luckily this is rare and containable.

Take Alcohol for example, the use of which causes far too many deaths and violent acts each year. Alcohol is legal, yet if you were to walk into any Hospital's A&E Department between 10pm and 4am on a Friday or Saturday, you would wonder how it is still legal. Alcohol costs the NHS millions, possibly billions, each year, far more than most other drugs put together.

Also, taking violence into account, if you are at a concert or sports event, and a man starts to become violent and aggressive, is he drunk or has he been smoking Cannabis?

On top of this, I, along with many others, would agree that users of Cannabis should not be allowed to waste NHS funds and so treatment for drug-related problems should be allowed to be denied by the Doctor asked to perform the aforementioned treatment.

In short, the legalisation, but heavy taxing, of Cannabis could be a good thing for our country as a whole, as Cannabis tends to make people relaxed.

Repeal the ability for the police to issue curfews and break up groups of youths, but once the problem is solved.

Surely the best, and most efficient way to tackle youth crime is to hit the problem at its roots: The gap between privileged and un-privileged.

Most vandals and ASBO holders are from deprived areas where education is, let's say, not as strong as in other places. The emphasis in some, not all, of these areas is possibly the culprit. Possibly the biggest problem is the emphasis on C grades at GCSE Level. Students of a higher level in these areas are often forgotten about and the school focuses its full academic attention on those with a borderline grade performance. Students should all be encouraged to aim for the highest grades, rather than having the implication that they 'make do' with the bell-curve average.

Also, many youths who are members of a violent gang are, for the sake of argument, often not of as high an intellect as their non-violent counterparts. If, however, enough attention were paid to these people as they went through the base-levels of the education system, it is likely they would show no interest whatsoever in violence and narcotic

Solutions: 1-Close, or shrink, the gap between privileged and non-priviliged-Possibly by taxing the wealthy more, or offering incentives to Youths who achieve high-grade(A*,A,B) passes in exams. Incentives such as a one-off bonus payment of around £1000. This would easily be recouped later through the higher rates of income tax they would pay, and would also encourage youths to put a lot of effort into their education.

2-Encourage smaller class sizes at lower levels of education, and higher levels too if possible, allowing each student the attention they deserve.

3-Don't 'enemise' youths. Repeal the rights for the police to disperse groups of youths "just because".

Why is this idea important?

Surely the best, and most efficient way to tackle youth crime is to hit the problem at its roots: The gap between privileged and un-privileged.

Most vandals and ASBO holders are from deprived areas where education is, let's say, not as strong as in other places. The emphasis in some, not all, of these areas is possibly the culprit. Possibly the biggest problem is the emphasis on C grades at GCSE Level. Students of a higher level in these areas are often forgotten about and the school focuses its full academic attention on those with a borderline grade performance. Students should all be encouraged to aim for the highest grades, rather than having the implication that they 'make do' with the bell-curve average.

Also, many youths who are members of a violent gang are, for the sake of argument, often not of as high an intellect as their non-violent counterparts. If, however, enough attention were paid to these people as they went through the base-levels of the education system, it is likely they would show no interest whatsoever in violence and narcotic

Solutions: 1-Close, or shrink, the gap between privileged and non-priviliged-Possibly by taxing the wealthy more, or offering incentives to Youths who achieve high-grade(A*,A,B) passes in exams. Incentives such as a one-off bonus payment of around £1000. This would easily be recouped later through the higher rates of income tax they would pay, and would also encourage youths to put a lot of effort into their education.

2-Encourage smaller class sizes at lower levels of education, and higher levels too if possible, allowing each student the attention they deserve.

3-Don't 'enemise' youths. Repeal the rights for the police to disperse groups of youths "just because".