Repeal the part of the Road Traffic Act 1988 on closed road for special events

Throughout Europe (and also in Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man), ‘closed road’ events bring great benefit to the local communities in terms of tourism, economic prosperity and sporting kudos. The UK is at a disadvantage and is not able to reap these benefits because s.12(1), of the Road Traffic Act 1988, makes it an offence for a person to promote or take part in a race or trial of speed between motor vehicles on a public way. Though it is understandable that this legislation is directed at preventing dangerous and unregulated races and speed trials, properly monitored events can be both safe and enjoyable.  Instead of abolishing the legislation completely the new UK government could provide a mechanism to deliver a Temporary Suspension Order (in association with local authorities) that would enable a limited annual number of ‘closed road’ events to take place in England, Wales and Scotland, with the associated benefits for the regions selected. Previous studies undertaken on behalf of the Jim Clark Rally, put the figure for that one event in excess of £3m – this leads the MSA to estimate that closed road rallying for a limited number of approximately 20 events a year, could deliver substantial benefit to local areas, particularly in the low season, of between £20m and £60m a year.

Why is this idea important?

Throughout Europe (and also in Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man), ‘closed road’ events bring great benefit to the local communities in terms of tourism, economic prosperity and sporting kudos. The UK is at a disadvantage and is not able to reap these benefits because s.12(1), of the Road Traffic Act 1988, makes it an offence for a person to promote or take part in a race or trial of speed between motor vehicles on a public way. Though it is understandable that this legislation is directed at preventing dangerous and unregulated races and speed trials, properly monitored events can be both safe and enjoyable.  Instead of abolishing the legislation completely the new UK government could provide a mechanism to deliver a Temporary Suspension Order (in association with local authorities) that would enable a limited annual number of ‘closed road’ events to take place in England, Wales and Scotland, with the associated benefits for the regions selected. Previous studies undertaken on behalf of the Jim Clark Rally, put the figure for that one event in excess of £3m – this leads the MSA to estimate that closed road rallying for a limited number of approximately 20 events a year, could deliver substantial benefit to local areas, particularly in the low season, of between £20m and £60m a year.

Repeal the part of the Road Traffic Act 1988 on closed road for special events

Throughout Europe (and also in Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man), ‘closed road’ events bring great benefit to the local communities in terms of tourism, economic prosperity and sporting kudos. The UK is at a disadvantage and is not able to reap these benefits because s.12(1), of the Road Traffic Act 1988, makes it an offence for a person to promote or take part in a race or trial of speed between motor vehicles on a public way. Though it is understandable that this legislation is directed at preventing dangerous and unregulated races and speed trials, properly monitored events can be both safe and enjoyable.  Instead of abolishing the legislation completely the new UK government could provide a mechanism to deliver a Temporary Suspension Order (in association with local authorities) that would enable a limited annual number of ‘closed road’ events to take place in England, Wales and Scotland, with the associated benefits for the regions selected. Previous studies undertaken on behalf of the Jim Clark Rally, put the figure for that one event in excess of £3m – this leads the MSA to estimate that closed road rallying for a limited number of approximately 20 events a year, could deliver substantial benefit to local areas, particularly in the low season, of between £20m and £60m a year

Why is this idea important?

Throughout Europe (and also in Northern Ireland and the Isle of Man), ‘closed road’ events bring great benefit to the local communities in terms of tourism, economic prosperity and sporting kudos. The UK is at a disadvantage and is not able to reap these benefits because s.12(1), of the Road Traffic Act 1988, makes it an offence for a person to promote or take part in a race or trial of speed between motor vehicles on a public way. Though it is understandable that this legislation is directed at preventing dangerous and unregulated races and speed trials, properly monitored events can be both safe and enjoyable.  Instead of abolishing the legislation completely the new UK government could provide a mechanism to deliver a Temporary Suspension Order (in association with local authorities) that would enable a limited annual number of ‘closed road’ events to take place in England, Wales and Scotland, with the associated benefits for the regions selected. Previous studies undertaken on behalf of the Jim Clark Rally, put the figure for that one event in excess of £3m – this leads the MSA to estimate that closed road rallying for a limited number of approximately 20 events a year, could deliver substantial benefit to local areas, particularly in the low season, of between £20m and £60m a year