Human Tissue Act

Currently the Human Tissue Act 2004 defines tissue as: "The HT Act regulates removal, storage and use of human tissue – defined as material that has come from a human body and consists of, or includes, human cells."

The authority has interpreted this to mean any sample that could possibly contain a remnant of a cell, whether whole or destroyed, including serum, urine, sputum (phlegm), CSF if collected for research or archiving purposes.

In fact, serum is created by spinning the cellular material out of the sample, and most urine samples have very cellular content. The majority of samples stored are serum samples, and they fall under the HTA. I would argue that such a wide definition of the HTA creates a huge, and unnecessary workload for research hospitals, with no demonstrable gain to the public.

Why is this idea important?

Currently the Human Tissue Act 2004 defines tissue as: "The HT Act regulates removal, storage and use of human tissue – defined as material that has come from a human body and consists of, or includes, human cells."

The authority has interpreted this to mean any sample that could possibly contain a remnant of a cell, whether whole or destroyed, including serum, urine, sputum (phlegm), CSF if collected for research or archiving purposes.

In fact, serum is created by spinning the cellular material out of the sample, and most urine samples have very cellular content. The majority of samples stored are serum samples, and they fall under the HTA. I would argue that such a wide definition of the HTA creates a huge, and unnecessary workload for research hospitals, with no demonstrable gain to the public.