Repeal 1701 Act of Settlement that explicitly discriminates against Roman Catholics

Given the on-going debate in parliament – some of it ushered in via private members bills and the alike – of repealing discriminatory clauses extant in the 1701 Act of Settlement against Roman Catholics, it would be opportune to tackle this issue head-on and secure bi-partisan support for its repeal. In the context of civil liberties and the Human Rights Act, it is counter-progressive to allow such an archaic and discriminatory provision to remain on the statute books. Furthermore, past inertia on the issue needs to be changed and swift action taken to repeal a provision that is of concern for some Catholics in the United Kingdom who are, in this legal context, regarded as second class citizen. Repeal of this unnecessary and potentially internationally embarrassing Act in view of the upcoming Papal visit, would ensure consistency in the Government’s commitment to Human Rights for all its citizens, an essential prerequisite in a modern, pluralist society.  

Why is this idea important?

Given the on-going debate in parliament – some of it ushered in via private members bills and the alike – of repealing discriminatory clauses extant in the 1701 Act of Settlement against Roman Catholics, it would be opportune to tackle this issue head-on and secure bi-partisan support for its repeal. In the context of civil liberties and the Human Rights Act, it is counter-progressive to allow such an archaic and discriminatory provision to remain on the statute books. Furthermore, past inertia on the issue needs to be changed and swift action taken to repeal a provision that is of concern for some Catholics in the United Kingdom who are, in this legal context, regarded as second class citizen. Repeal of this unnecessary and potentially internationally embarrassing Act in view of the upcoming Papal visit, would ensure consistency in the Government’s commitment to Human Rights for all its citizens, an essential prerequisite in a modern, pluralist society.  

repeal 1701 Act of Settlement that explicitly discrimminates against Roman Catholics

Given the on-going debate in parliament – some of it ushered in via private members bills and the alike – of repealing discriminatory clauses extant in the 1701 Act of Settlement against Roman Catholics, it would be opportune to tackle this issue head-on and secure bi-partisan support for its repeal. In the context of civil liberties and the Human Rights Act, it is counter-progressive to allow such an archaic and discriminatory provision to remain on the statute books. Furthermore, past inertia on the issue needs to be changed and swift action taken to repeal a provision that is of concern for some Catholics in the United Kingdom who are, in this legal context, regarded as second class citizen. Repeal of this unnecessary and potentially internationally embarrassing Act in view of the upcoming Papal visit, would ensure consistency in the Government’s commitment to Human Rights for all its citizens, an essential prerequisite in a modern, pluralist society.  

Why is this idea important?

Given the on-going debate in parliament – some of it ushered in via private members bills and the alike – of repealing discriminatory clauses extant in the 1701 Act of Settlement against Roman Catholics, it would be opportune to tackle this issue head-on and secure bi-partisan support for its repeal. In the context of civil liberties and the Human Rights Act, it is counter-progressive to allow such an archaic and discriminatory provision to remain on the statute books. Furthermore, past inertia on the issue needs to be changed and swift action taken to repeal a provision that is of concern for some Catholics in the United Kingdom who are, in this legal context, regarded as second class citizen. Repeal of this unnecessary and potentially internationally embarrassing Act in view of the upcoming Papal visit, would ensure consistency in the Government’s commitment to Human Rights for all its citizens, an essential prerequisite in a modern, pluralist society.