Cutting building costs with unnecessary guidance (BREAAM)

I have observed how the BREAAM guidance has been utilised on many new build schemes often within the public sector projects 

It is heavy handed, cumbersome and onerous and seems to produce nothing of real tangible value to projects but does increase building costs, particularly at the design stages on projects that are usually funded from the public purse

Now, I understand the requirements of good environmental practice but many of these regs are completely spurious and often the whole exercise becomes a box ticking operation to gain a few more credits.

There are usually qualified professional consultants engaged on such new build projects who will have the experience and skill to consider the environmental benefits at the most cost effective route, without incurring all the extra cost and time involved in achieving this point scoring exercise

Why is this idea important?

I have observed how the BREAAM guidance has been utilised on many new build schemes often within the public sector projects 

It is heavy handed, cumbersome and onerous and seems to produce nothing of real tangible value to projects but does increase building costs, particularly at the design stages on projects that are usually funded from the public purse

Now, I understand the requirements of good environmental practice but many of these regs are completely spurious and often the whole exercise becomes a box ticking operation to gain a few more credits.

There are usually qualified professional consultants engaged on such new build projects who will have the experience and skill to consider the environmental benefits at the most cost effective route, without incurring all the extra cost and time involved in achieving this point scoring exercise

Ease the Planning route for recovery

I am professionally involved with the built environment and have, like many others observed the decline in the economic benefits of an active building industry, which is one of the few productive industries that the UK has.

When the recovery starts to take place, we anticipate that many developers will be looking to submit new applications and try to get projects moving but will be hitting brick walls when dealing with planning issues and getting schemes approved.

We need to have a proactive, co-operative Planning system that can process applications quickly so that the industry can start moving and generating income, let alone quality schemes.

Although the 8 week rule applies we have found even getting pre-app discussions and conditions approved can double that time period.

Why is this idea important?

I am professionally involved with the built environment and have, like many others observed the decline in the economic benefits of an active building industry, which is one of the few productive industries that the UK has.

When the recovery starts to take place, we anticipate that many developers will be looking to submit new applications and try to get projects moving but will be hitting brick walls when dealing with planning issues and getting schemes approved.

We need to have a proactive, co-operative Planning system that can process applications quickly so that the industry can start moving and generating income, let alone quality schemes.

Although the 8 week rule applies we have found even getting pre-app discussions and conditions approved can double that time period.