Provide co-housing to help with mobility of labour

Establish co-housing projects in areas that need influxes of labour to encourage indigenous migration for work.

Short term housing contracts could help young people find their feet and live in a local community of like minded others and then move on.

Why is this idea important?

Establish co-housing projects in areas that need influxes of labour to encourage indigenous migration for work.

Short term housing contracts could help young people find their feet and live in a local community of like minded others and then move on.

Dignity and supporting independence for disabled people who need welfare support

Disabled benefits should encourage independence and maintain dignity at all times.

The government should enter into a individually tailored contract between the disabled person and the state with asserts rights and responsibilites

The contract would give the disabled person the right of privacy and freedom from fear of having benefits summarily stopped if rules re infringed.

The contract should also require and incentivise paid or unpaid work  or learning

The outcome would be more independent and productive disabled people who may return to the labour market and give them greater security, self respect and pride in their engagement with the welfare state.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why is this idea important?

Disabled benefits should encourage independence and maintain dignity at all times.

The government should enter into a individually tailored contract between the disabled person and the state with asserts rights and responsibilites

The contract would give the disabled person the right of privacy and freedom from fear of having benefits summarily stopped if rules re infringed.

The contract should also require and incentivise paid or unpaid work  or learning

The outcome would be more independent and productive disabled people who may return to the labour market and give them greater security, self respect and pride in their engagement with the welfare state.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Empowering disabled people to have their own parking space outside their own home

Create personal disabled parking spaces for blue badge holders outside their own homes.

This priviledge should only be offered to those persons on higher rate mobilty rate DLA

At present such spaces are routinely refused by most councils on grounds of high cost due to red tape that has to be followed to create them. Disabled parking bays make a huge difference to a persons quality of life, disability equality and civil rights.

Spaces should be able to be created cheaply and simply through special dispensation from the Department for Transport to create enforceable disabled parking bays without the need for expensive and lengthy Traffic Regulation Orders. This would require the same arrangements in place currently to create a bus stop with no stopping "cage".

Why is this idea important?

Create personal disabled parking spaces for blue badge holders outside their own homes.

This priviledge should only be offered to those persons on higher rate mobilty rate DLA

At present such spaces are routinely refused by most councils on grounds of high cost due to red tape that has to be followed to create them. Disabled parking bays make a huge difference to a persons quality of life, disability equality and civil rights.

Spaces should be able to be created cheaply and simply through special dispensation from the Department for Transport to create enforceable disabled parking bays without the need for expensive and lengthy Traffic Regulation Orders. This would require the same arrangements in place currently to create a bus stop with no stopping "cage".

Reducing the burden of public consultation

Make public consultation duties and activity more proportionate and value for money or in some cases enable authorities to act first then receive feedback with the ability to make changes if required rather than encourage delay and procrastination with consultation exercises.

Considerable time, effort and public money is spent on listening exercising with little proven benefit. Consultation activity was massively increased in the late 1990s across the public sector.

Quality outcomes can be driven by used of more effective market research and made accountable through a committment to make changes during a probation period, rather than waste time and money on consultation rounds.

For example: changes to waiting restrictions (yellow line restrictions)

To install yellow lines the public are consulted, this work is undertaken by every local council. It would be quicker to install them on an experimental basis, using professional judgement and consulting with local elected members, install them and then seek feedback. At present simple proposals are costly and take consdierable officer time to implement. The Traffic Regulation Order process needs to be simplified.

For example: changes to NHS service provision in Greater Manchester

Millions of pounds of public money were spent on listening exercises with regard to changes to NHS services in 2006/7. The NHS was duty bound to conduct this exercise, but the available options had already been determined by cost and service efficacy reasons. The customer did not know best as often their reasoning was based on emotional reactions or inertia to change. If change is essential, consultation should be limited and the public told what is not on the table for discussion. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why is this idea important?

Make public consultation duties and activity more proportionate and value for money or in some cases enable authorities to act first then receive feedback with the ability to make changes if required rather than encourage delay and procrastination with consultation exercises.

Considerable time, effort and public money is spent on listening exercising with little proven benefit. Consultation activity was massively increased in the late 1990s across the public sector.

Quality outcomes can be driven by used of more effective market research and made accountable through a committment to make changes during a probation period, rather than waste time and money on consultation rounds.

For example: changes to waiting restrictions (yellow line restrictions)

To install yellow lines the public are consulted, this work is undertaken by every local council. It would be quicker to install them on an experimental basis, using professional judgement and consulting with local elected members, install them and then seek feedback. At present simple proposals are costly and take consdierable officer time to implement. The Traffic Regulation Order process needs to be simplified.

For example: changes to NHS service provision in Greater Manchester

Millions of pounds of public money were spent on listening exercises with regard to changes to NHS services in 2006/7. The NHS was duty bound to conduct this exercise, but the available options had already been determined by cost and service efficacy reasons. The customer did not know best as often their reasoning was based on emotional reactions or inertia to change. If change is essential, consultation should be limited and the public told what is not on the table for discussion.