Make cannabis a controlled drug – legalise and regulate it

Cannabis is not a controlled drug, despite what politicians and police may tell you. A substance cannot be said to be "controlled" unless the trade in that substance is controlled.

Prohibition – the policy applied to cannabis – makes any control of the trade impossible because:

1: We have no idea who sells cannabis
2: We have no idea where cannabis is sold from
3: We have no way to control what is sold in terms of strength, purity or – and this is perhaps the most important aspect – type; different types or strains of cannabis contain different ratios of THC and CBD which may be very important if the claims of a link to mental ill-health are true.
4: There can be no restriction on the trade such as age limits
5: Dealers often don’t know what they’re selling – the only qualification needed to be a dealer is unaccountability.

In addition we can't even study the user group. Because the use of cannabis is illegal there is no way to take valid statistical measurements of the consumers or of what they are buying. This is why the move from imported hash to so-called "skunk" went unnoticed for 10 years by the authorities who claim to be in control.

Why is this idea important?

Cannabis is not a controlled drug, despite what politicians and police may tell you. A substance cannot be said to be "controlled" unless the trade in that substance is controlled.

Prohibition – the policy applied to cannabis – makes any control of the trade impossible because:

1: We have no idea who sells cannabis
2: We have no idea where cannabis is sold from
3: We have no way to control what is sold in terms of strength, purity or – and this is perhaps the most important aspect – type; different types or strains of cannabis contain different ratios of THC and CBD which may be very important if the claims of a link to mental ill-health are true.
4: There can be no restriction on the trade such as age limits
5: Dealers often don’t know what they’re selling – the only qualification needed to be a dealer is unaccountability.

In addition we can't even study the user group. Because the use of cannabis is illegal there is no way to take valid statistical measurements of the consumers or of what they are buying. This is why the move from imported hash to so-called "skunk" went unnoticed for 10 years by the authorities who claim to be in control.

Make cannabis a controlled drug – legalise and regulate it

Cannabis is not a controlled drug, despite what politicians and police may tell you. A substance cannot be said to be "controlled" unless the trade in that substance is controlled.

Prohibition – the policy applied to cannabis – makes any control of the trade impossible because:

1: We have no idea who sells cannabis
2: We have no idea where cannabis is sold from
3: We have no way to control what is sold in terms of strength, purity or – and this is perhaps the most important aspect – type; different types or strains of cannabis contain different ratios of THC and CBD which may be very important if the claims of a link to mental ill-health are true.
4: There can be no restriction on the trade such as age limits
5: Dealers often don’t know what they’re selling – the only qualification needed to be a dealer is unaccountability.

In addition we can't even study the user group. Because the use of cannabis is illegal there is no way to take valid statistical measurements of the consumers or of what they are buying. This is why the move from imported hash to so-called "skunk" went unnoticed for 10 years by the authorities who claim to be in control.

Why is this idea important?

Cannabis is not a controlled drug, despite what politicians and police may tell you. A substance cannot be said to be "controlled" unless the trade in that substance is controlled.

Prohibition – the policy applied to cannabis – makes any control of the trade impossible because:

1: We have no idea who sells cannabis
2: We have no idea where cannabis is sold from
3: We have no way to control what is sold in terms of strength, purity or – and this is perhaps the most important aspect – type; different types or strains of cannabis contain different ratios of THC and CBD which may be very important if the claims of a link to mental ill-health are true.
4: There can be no restriction on the trade such as age limits
5: Dealers often don’t know what they’re selling – the only qualification needed to be a dealer is unaccountability.

In addition we can't even study the user group. Because the use of cannabis is illegal there is no way to take valid statistical measurements of the consumers or of what they are buying. This is why the move from imported hash to so-called "skunk" went unnoticed for 10 years by the authorities who claim to be in control.

Make cannabis a controlled drug – legalise and regulate it

Cannabis is not a controlled drug, despite what politicians and police may tell you. A substance cannot be said to be "controlled" unless the trade in that substance is controlled.

Prohibition – the policy applied to cannabis – makes any control of the trade impossible because:

1: We have no idea who sells cannabis
2: We have no idea where cannabis is sold from
3: We have no way to control what is sold in terms of strength, purity or – and this is perhaps the most important aspect – type; different types or strains of cannabis contain different ratios of THC and CBD which may be very important if the claims of a link to mental ill-health are true.
4: There can be no restriction on the trade such as age limits
5: Dealers often don’t know what they’re selling – the only qualification needed to be a dealer is unaccountability.

In addition we can't even study the user group. Because the use of cannabis is illegal there is no way to take valid statistical measurements of the consumers or of what they are buying. This is why the move from imported hash to so-called "skunk" went unnoticed for 10 years by the authorities who claim to be in control.

Why is this idea important?

Cannabis is not a controlled drug, despite what politicians and police may tell you. A substance cannot be said to be "controlled" unless the trade in that substance is controlled.

Prohibition – the policy applied to cannabis – makes any control of the trade impossible because:

1: We have no idea who sells cannabis
2: We have no idea where cannabis is sold from
3: We have no way to control what is sold in terms of strength, purity or – and this is perhaps the most important aspect – type; different types or strains of cannabis contain different ratios of THC and CBD which may be very important if the claims of a link to mental ill-health are true.
4: There can be no restriction on the trade such as age limits
5: Dealers often don’t know what they’re selling – the only qualification needed to be a dealer is unaccountability.

In addition we can't even study the user group. Because the use of cannabis is illegal there is no way to take valid statistical measurements of the consumers or of what they are buying. This is why the move from imported hash to so-called "skunk" went unnoticed for 10 years by the authorities who claim to be in control.