Switch the speed-limits on roads to metric ASAP. Delaying is starting to cost money…

It's well overdue that an "officially metric" country such as ours should demonstrate that offical line by changing the existing out-of-date road signs to metric. Most British drivers have been 100% educated in metric, and everyone's used to sports events using metric measurements for everything.

It is possibly not obvious that delaying any further on the speed-limits issue is actually a direct problem. However, is *is* a problem and here's why:

Councils all across the country are installing more and more radar-operated speed-warning signs as a technique for encouraging motorists to slow down where appropriate. ( I have no problem with that, it's a far better method than making criminals of perfectly good people who just happen to be looking out of the windscreen at the road rather than fixating on what their speedo says! )

However – these radar-triggered signs are in many cases physically built with arrays of LEDs that form the shape of a red roundel with "30" or "20" written inside just like the fixed speed-linit signs. And therein lies the problem.

When the inevitable switch to metric road signs does happen, those signs are going to need to be rebuilt. It's likely not to be the sort of thing that can be done by a council road gang at the side of the road. The signs will probably need to be de-mounted, taken back to the depot, changed, and then re-fitted. The "changed" bit might even require the sign to be sent back to the manufacturer.

This is going to cost MONEY. The longer we leave the switchover to km/h the worse it will get.

So the claim of this thread is – please repeal the out-of-date requirements of the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions that are forcing the use of miles and miles-per-hour on our signs, and join the rest of the world using km and km/h.

The UK does have a land border with another country (Eire) that already uses km/h on its signs. You get to drive faster on de-limited Irish roads too because 120km/h is faster than 70mph.

Why is this idea important?

It's well overdue that an "officially metric" country such as ours should demonstrate that offical line by changing the existing out-of-date road signs to metric. Most British drivers have been 100% educated in metric, and everyone's used to sports events using metric measurements for everything.

It is possibly not obvious that delaying any further on the speed-limits issue is actually a direct problem. However, is *is* a problem and here's why:

Councils all across the country are installing more and more radar-operated speed-warning signs as a technique for encouraging motorists to slow down where appropriate. ( I have no problem with that, it's a far better method than making criminals of perfectly good people who just happen to be looking out of the windscreen at the road rather than fixating on what their speedo says! )

However – these radar-triggered signs are in many cases physically built with arrays of LEDs that form the shape of a red roundel with "30" or "20" written inside just like the fixed speed-linit signs. And therein lies the problem.

When the inevitable switch to metric road signs does happen, those signs are going to need to be rebuilt. It's likely not to be the sort of thing that can be done by a council road gang at the side of the road. The signs will probably need to be de-mounted, taken back to the depot, changed, and then re-fitted. The "changed" bit might even require the sign to be sent back to the manufacturer.

This is going to cost MONEY. The longer we leave the switchover to km/h the worse it will get.

So the claim of this thread is – please repeal the out-of-date requirements of the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions that are forcing the use of miles and miles-per-hour on our signs, and join the rest of the world using km and km/h.

The UK does have a land border with another country (Eire) that already uses km/h on its signs. You get to drive faster on de-limited Irish roads too because 120km/h is faster than 70mph.

Revoke the anomaly that cow’s milk can be sold in weird units.

Alone amongst all the liquids on sale in our supermarkets, cow's milk is unique in that it can be sold in multiples of 568ml rather than the more sensible 500ml used for everything else. In practice, cow's milk is often sold in *both* multiples (and on the same shelves too) and the result is a serious confusion for us, the customers.

Why is this permitted to happen? You don't find goat's milk or orange juice for sale in 568ml cartons – what was so magical about milk that made it an exception?

It's silly. Needs revoking.

Why is this idea important?

Alone amongst all the liquids on sale in our supermarkets, cow's milk is unique in that it can be sold in multiples of 568ml rather than the more sensible 500ml used for everything else. In practice, cow's milk is often sold in *both* multiples (and on the same shelves too) and the result is a serious confusion for us, the customers.

Why is this permitted to happen? You don't find goat's milk or orange juice for sale in 568ml cartons – what was so magical about milk that made it an exception?

It's silly. Needs revoking.

Revoke the Weights and Measures (Metrication Amendments) Regulations 2009 where they extend “Supplementary Indications” indefinately.

The weights and measures acts of 1985 and 2001 placed a limit (now expired) of December 31st 2009 for the country to discontinue the practice of dual-labelling items in imperial units alongside the metric units. This was already a limit that had been moved several times, and it is high time the limit actually be enacted and enforced and that we finally see the last of the old-fashioned imperial measures in our shops.

Unfortunately, our previous government saw fit, not only to revoke these provisions, but to declare that supplementary indications may continue indefinately!

It is the 21st century – in fact we're 10% of the way through the 21st century! This country declared that it was in our interest to switch to metric measures to the benefit of our science, engineering and trade back in —- 1896!

We should revoke those spineless clauses in the 2009 regulations nos. 3045 and 3046 to reinstate a cut-off point for supplementary indications, and make it as soon as possible since until that capitulation by Nu Labour, we would by now already be rid of them. So maybe please reset the cut-off to December 31st 2011 and this time STICK BY IT!

Why is this idea important?

The weights and measures acts of 1985 and 2001 placed a limit (now expired) of December 31st 2009 for the country to discontinue the practice of dual-labelling items in imperial units alongside the metric units. This was already a limit that had been moved several times, and it is high time the limit actually be enacted and enforced and that we finally see the last of the old-fashioned imperial measures in our shops.

Unfortunately, our previous government saw fit, not only to revoke these provisions, but to declare that supplementary indications may continue indefinately!

It is the 21st century – in fact we're 10% of the way through the 21st century! This country declared that it was in our interest to switch to metric measures to the benefit of our science, engineering and trade back in —- 1896!

We should revoke those spineless clauses in the 2009 regulations nos. 3045 and 3046 to reinstate a cut-off point for supplementary indications, and make it as soon as possible since until that capitulation by Nu Labour, we would by now already be rid of them. So maybe please reset the cut-off to December 31st 2011 and this time STICK BY IT!

Adopt the metric pint (i.e as slang for 500ml)

We live in peculiar times. This country passed laws legalising to metric measurements in 1896, and actually declared itself to be an "offically metric country" in 1995. Real speedy progress there guys! Only 99 years to do it!

But of course we all know it to be a fabrication. Amongst our odd legislation still on the statute books is a requirement that pubs sell draught beer by the old imperial pint, and an exemption to the usual rules allowing milk sold in returnable containers also to be sold in old imperial pints.

Why does an "officially metric" country have these anomalous laws? They should really be repealed now.

Why is this idea important?

We live in peculiar times. This country passed laws legalising to metric measurements in 1896, and actually declared itself to be an "offically metric country" in 1995. Real speedy progress there guys! Only 99 years to do it!

But of course we all know it to be a fabrication. Amongst our odd legislation still on the statute books is a requirement that pubs sell draught beer by the old imperial pint, and an exemption to the usual rules allowing milk sold in returnable containers also to be sold in old imperial pints.

Why does an "officially metric" country have these anomalous laws? They should really be repealed now.

Switch the white-on-brown “tourism” roadsigns to metric

Currently, the familiar white-on-brown roadsigns providing directions to tourist attractions are treated as any other roadsign and their formats are strictly governed by the Traffic Signs Regualtions and General Directions act (of 2002). That's OK in itself, but this forces those signs to conform with the other rules in TSRGD which enforce the use of miles and yards onto all signs.

Now, these are signs that are predominantly intended for tourists. A large number of these tourists will be from outside the UK and won't be familiar with miles or yards (as indeed are our own children until they are about 9 or 10 years old).

Make Britain more friendly for our visitors, and change the tourist signs to metric. Don't waste money requiring the old ones to be converted (though that would be an option). Just make it a requirement that all new ones are in metric and that when old ones need replacing that the replacement shall be in metric.

Just metric, not both systems. That would clutter the signs horribly especially in Wales where the current signs have to be translated. ( Welsh for 'mile' is 'milltir' and 'yards' is 'llath'. ) The great advantage of metric in Wales is that 'km' is 'km' and doesn't need to be translated. Other bits may do, but at least the distances would only appear once, and be clearly understood by all.

Why is this idea important?

Currently, the familiar white-on-brown roadsigns providing directions to tourist attractions are treated as any other roadsign and their formats are strictly governed by the Traffic Signs Regualtions and General Directions act (of 2002). That's OK in itself, but this forces those signs to conform with the other rules in TSRGD which enforce the use of miles and yards onto all signs.

Now, these are signs that are predominantly intended for tourists. A large number of these tourists will be from outside the UK and won't be familiar with miles or yards (as indeed are our own children until they are about 9 or 10 years old).

Make Britain more friendly for our visitors, and change the tourist signs to metric. Don't waste money requiring the old ones to be converted (though that would be an option). Just make it a requirement that all new ones are in metric and that when old ones need replacing that the replacement shall be in metric.

Just metric, not both systems. That would clutter the signs horribly especially in Wales where the current signs have to be translated. ( Welsh for 'mile' is 'milltir' and 'yards' is 'llath'. ) The great advantage of metric in Wales is that 'km' is 'km' and doesn't need to be translated. Other bits may do, but at least the distances would only appear once, and be clearly understood by all.

The Traffic Signs Regulations should not have authority over footpaths and cycleways

Currently, the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002 (TSRGD 2002) control the shapes and formats of every permissible roadsign in the UK. This is good, but the TSRGD 2002 overflows its brief in that it also controls permissible signs on footpaths and cycleways.

Currently the TSRGD 2002 rules mandate the use of miles and yards on all distance signs. Because of the overlap onto cycleways and footpaths, a possibly unintended consequence of this is that the country's footpaths and cycleways have to be signposted in miles and yards too.

This is bad for business and confusing to all.

Cycleways and Footpaths should be governed by their own regulations, in metric from the start. It's the 21st century and Britain claims (officially) to be a metric country. Kindly make the facts match the claims!

Why is this idea important?

Currently, the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002 (TSRGD 2002) control the shapes and formats of every permissible roadsign in the UK. This is good, but the TSRGD 2002 overflows its brief in that it also controls permissible signs on footpaths and cycleways.

Currently the TSRGD 2002 rules mandate the use of miles and yards on all distance signs. Because of the overlap onto cycleways and footpaths, a possibly unintended consequence of this is that the country's footpaths and cycleways have to be signposted in miles and yards too.

This is bad for business and confusing to all.

Cycleways and Footpaths should be governed by their own regulations, in metric from the start. It's the 21st century and Britain claims (officially) to be a metric country. Kindly make the facts match the claims!