Repeal Section 58A of the Terrorism Act 2000 to prevent abuse by police preventing members of the public from photographing police, and repeal section 43 and Section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000 that has been abused to harras photographers.

Why is this idea important?

 

There is very strong evidence that section 44 and 43 are continually abused by police to harass photographers 
 
http://photographernotaterrorist.org/2009/12/didnt-you-get-the-memo/
 
Despite advice on the METs own website
 
 
Futhermore section 58A been abused as well 
 
http://photographernotaterrorist.org/2009/08/home-office-issues-new-advice/
 
It is clear the regardless of advice from the Home Office or the APCO the City of London Police continue to abuse the law in a way that is not intended (see below)
 
More cases of abuse from the wikipedia
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrorism_Act_2000
 
In October 2008 police stopped a 15-year-old schoolboy in south London who was taking photographs of Wimbledon railway station for his school geography project. He was questioned under suspicion of being a terrorist. His parents raised concerns that his personal data could be held on a police database for up to six years.[32]
Member of Parliament Andrew Pelling was questioned after photographing roadworks near a railway station[33]
In April 2009 a man in Enfield was questioned under Section 44 for photographing a police car that he considered was being driven inappropriately along a public footpath.[34]
Trainspotters have frequently been subjected to stop and search; in August 2009 a rail enthusiast was pursued by Dyfed-Powys Police for photographing a locomotive at a Murco oil refinery in Milford Haven.[35] Between 2000 and 2009, police used powers under the Act to stop 62,584 people at railway stations.[36]
In November 2009, BBC photographer Jeff Overs was searched and questioned by police outside the Tate Modern art gallery for photographing the sunset over St Paul's Cathedral, under suspicion of preparing for a terrorist act. Overs lodged a formal complaint with the Metropolitan Police.[37][38]
In December 2009, renowned architectural photographer Grant Smith was searched by a group of City of London Police officers under Section 44 because he was taking photographs of Christ Church Greyfriars; although he was working on public ground, the church's proximity to the Bank of America City of London branch caused a bank security guard to call the police.[39]
There is very strong evidence that section 44 and 43 are continually abused by police to harass photographers
 
Despite advice on the METs own website
 
Futhermore section 58A been abused as well
 
It is clear the regardless of advice from the Home Office or the APCO the City of London Police continue to abuse the law in a way that is not intended (see below)
More cases of abuse from the wikipedia
 
  • In October 2008 police stopped a 15-year-old schoolboy in south London who was taking photographs of Wimbledon railway station for his school geography project. He was questioned under suspicion of being a terrorist. His parents raised concerns that his personal data could be held on a police database for up to six years.[32]
  • Member of Parliament Andrew Pelling was questioned after photographing roadworks near a railway station[33]
  • In April 2009 a man in Enfield was questioned under Section 44 for photographing a police car that he considered was being driven inappropriately along a public footpath.[34]
  • Trainspotters have frequently been subjected to stop and search; in August 2009 a rail enthusiast was pursued by Dyfed-Powys Police for photographing a locomotive at a Murco oil refinery in Milford Haven.[35] Between 2000 and 2009, police used powers under the Act to stop 62,584 people at railway stations.[36]
  • In November 2009, BBC photographer Jeff Overs was searched and questioned by police outside the Tate Modern art gallery for photographing the sunset over St Paul's Cathedral, under suspicion of preparing for a terrorist act. Overs lodged a formal complaint with the Metropolitan Police.[37][38]
  • In December 2009, renowned architectural photographer Grant Smith was searched by a group of City of London Police officers under Section 44 because he was taking photographs of Christ Church Greyfriars; although he was working on public ground, the church's proximity to the Bank of America City of London branch caused a bank security guard to call the police.[39]
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