Party Wall agreements

Your neighbour is doing something in their house, they won't tell you what it is, they have submitted plans to the council for building control, but they won't tell what your neighbour is doing either. You suspect your neighbour may need a party wall agreement for the work, but they haven't offered you for one. You are now compelled sit there while work continues without an agreement or engage a surveyor at around £1500 to intervene on the assumption you may need a party wall agreement, which is both a financial risk and a declaration of war on your neighbour.

Why not ensure that building control and planning permission will not be issued without the correct Party Wall agreements in place, that way the neighbours a protected as of right not the good graces of the people carrying out the work.

Why is this idea important?

Your neighbour is doing something in their house, they won't tell you what it is, they have submitted plans to the council for building control, but they won't tell what your neighbour is doing either. You suspect your neighbour may need a party wall agreement for the work, but they haven't offered you for one. You are now compelled sit there while work continues without an agreement or engage a surveyor at around £1500 to intervene on the assumption you may need a party wall agreement, which is both a financial risk and a declaration of war on your neighbour.

Why not ensure that building control and planning permission will not be issued without the correct Party Wall agreements in place, that way the neighbours a protected as of right not the good graces of the people carrying out the work.

Remove listed orders for private owned homes

Our house and next doors has the front facing bay window listed.The road we live on has approx 70%-80% block flats on it.Our house and next doors is in 1/2 of an acre.We cannot sell to developers because of this listing.I personally see no point to it as it is of no use to the public interest.The government should look at all old listed building order's and restrict them to places of interest to the public. Putting a listing on the front of a house makes no sense at all especially if the majority of buildings on the same road are all blocks of flats.We have a coach house which had a restriction for it not to be removed. When the Birmingham city council rented  one of their properties with the coachouse that was in need of repair they scrapped the listing just so that they could pull down their coachouse as re-building it would have cost alot,this was 2 doors away from us. They do what they want when they want.  

Why is this idea important?

Our house and next doors has the front facing bay window listed.The road we live on has approx 70%-80% block flats on it.Our house and next doors is in 1/2 of an acre.We cannot sell to developers because of this listing.I personally see no point to it as it is of no use to the public interest.The government should look at all old listed building order's and restrict them to places of interest to the public. Putting a listing on the front of a house makes no sense at all especially if the majority of buildings on the same road are all blocks of flats.We have a coach house which had a restriction for it not to be removed. When the Birmingham city council rented  one of their properties with the coachouse that was in need of repair they scrapped the listing just so that they could pull down their coachouse as re-building it would have cost alot,this was 2 doors away from us. They do what they want when they want.  

Drop extra restrictions on Housing Association development

For years, the Housing Corporation (as was – and may be again, who knows?) has required Housing Associations to meet standards far in excess of building regulations when building new housing, with the result that social housing is more expensive to develop than private housing of an equivalent size and Housing Associations often have to reject the chance to acquire perfectly good property offered to them by developers 'off the shelf'  for social rent because they do not meet some standard or other. The reason normally given for this is that the government likes to test ideas on housing associations before they are introduced as building regulations. There might have been an argument for this in the days of 100% grant, but not now that there is an unprecedented shortage of social housing and minimal grant. This is ridiculous – most of the people waiting for social housing would be overjoyed to be offered a brand new house of the type that a housing association might have to turn down and  this sort of over-regulation is just slowing down the supply of affordable housing and making social housing more expensive.  If something is such a good idea, just put it in building regs and have done with it. Leave housing associations and their tenants to decide what standards they want to set for their own accommodation – they are the ones who will have to manage and maintain it and they have the experience to recognise what will give them problems in the future.

Why is this idea important?

For years, the Housing Corporation (as was – and may be again, who knows?) has required Housing Associations to meet standards far in excess of building regulations when building new housing, with the result that social housing is more expensive to develop than private housing of an equivalent size and Housing Associations often have to reject the chance to acquire perfectly good property offered to them by developers 'off the shelf'  for social rent because they do not meet some standard or other. The reason normally given for this is that the government likes to test ideas on housing associations before they are introduced as building regulations. There might have been an argument for this in the days of 100% grant, but not now that there is an unprecedented shortage of social housing and minimal grant. This is ridiculous – most of the people waiting for social housing would be overjoyed to be offered a brand new house of the type that a housing association might have to turn down and  this sort of over-regulation is just slowing down the supply of affordable housing and making social housing more expensive.  If something is such a good idea, just put it in building regs and have done with it. Leave housing associations and their tenants to decide what standards they want to set for their own accommodation – they are the ones who will have to manage and maintain it and they have the experience to recognise what will give them problems in the future.