Bus Lanes should not be operative on Bank Holidays

Motorists pay huge road tax for driving on roads which are becoming narrower with every passing day while the number of cars are increasing. It is the duty of the local government to facilitate the motorists and not loot them by issuing PCNs for driving in an empty bus lane on a bank holiday.

Why is this idea important?

Motorists pay huge road tax for driving on roads which are becoming narrower with every passing day while the number of cars are increasing. It is the duty of the local government to facilitate the motorists and not loot them by issuing PCNs for driving in an empty bus lane on a bank holiday.

fuel costs

Fuel costs and other motoring costs are going to RISE despite the oil prices? Ok? Its happening? If you as a Goivernment are NOT going to step in and STOP garages from over charging us at the pump (by a new teired retail profit  price based tax system)

Then lets al least HELP people who NEED transport. I propose that taxis, busses, police services, ambulances, fire services, are all essential. And that for this reason they should be allowed to run on RED DIESEL. At present only agricultural vehicles can do this and it does not seem right.

Why is this idea important?

Fuel costs and other motoring costs are going to RISE despite the oil prices? Ok? Its happening? If you as a Goivernment are NOT going to step in and STOP garages from over charging us at the pump (by a new teired retail profit  price based tax system)

Then lets al least HELP people who NEED transport. I propose that taxis, busses, police services, ambulances, fire services, are all essential. And that for this reason they should be allowed to run on RED DIESEL. At present only agricultural vehicles can do this and it does not seem right.

Reverse bus deregulation by re-regulation and/or renationalisation

To improve standards on scheduled bus services and raise passenger numbers (particularly outside London), all services should be re-regulated in accordance to:

  • Each service being operated with consistent fleet management policies (ending the scenario where one journey has a low floor minibus with the second journey being operated by a step-entrance double decker bus) with a maximum vehicle age of 15 years old;
  • Allowing greater passenger input into timetable compilation and future service revisions (i.e enhancements, prospective withdrawals);
  • Minimum standards for service indicator layout with full details of route number, destination and details of intermediate stops;
  • Minimum standards of bus used, number of seats per hour and frequencies (similar to the Public Service Requirement in the 1994 Railways Act);
  • The guaranteeing of socially necessary evening, Sunday and Bank Holiday services;
  • Minimum standards of information provision (with real-time information made standard throughout the UK);
  • Offering affordable adult fares, free concessionary fares and a standard rate for all services based on mileage;
  • Abolishing wasteful competition along routes (the bus' main competitors are rail, tram, taxi and car rather than other routes).

Where services need to be taken into public ownership, priority should be given to:

  • All scheduled bus undertakings in rural areas (where access to public services is hampered by distance) and deprived urban areas (where car ownership is lower than average);
  • Metropolitan areas whom in 1986 lost a publicly funded network (as per the 1968 Transport Act) after deregulation. For instance, this could mean the return of South Yorkshire's cheap fares and the reversal of GM Buses' split in 1993;
  • Former municipal operators (i.e Yellow Buses in Bournemouth, Chester City Transport and Plymouth Citybus);
  • All evening, Sunday and Bank Holiday services from Land's End to John O' Groats;
  • All hospital services and school buses.

Why is this idea important?

To improve standards on scheduled bus services and raise passenger numbers (particularly outside London), all services should be re-regulated in accordance to:

  • Each service being operated with consistent fleet management policies (ending the scenario where one journey has a low floor minibus with the second journey being operated by a step-entrance double decker bus) with a maximum vehicle age of 15 years old;
  • Allowing greater passenger input into timetable compilation and future service revisions (i.e enhancements, prospective withdrawals);
  • Minimum standards for service indicator layout with full details of route number, destination and details of intermediate stops;
  • Minimum standards of bus used, number of seats per hour and frequencies (similar to the Public Service Requirement in the 1994 Railways Act);
  • The guaranteeing of socially necessary evening, Sunday and Bank Holiday services;
  • Minimum standards of information provision (with real-time information made standard throughout the UK);
  • Offering affordable adult fares, free concessionary fares and a standard rate for all services based on mileage;
  • Abolishing wasteful competition along routes (the bus' main competitors are rail, tram, taxi and car rather than other routes).

Where services need to be taken into public ownership, priority should be given to:

  • All scheduled bus undertakings in rural areas (where access to public services is hampered by distance) and deprived urban areas (where car ownership is lower than average);
  • Metropolitan areas whom in 1986 lost a publicly funded network (as per the 1968 Transport Act) after deregulation. For instance, this could mean the return of South Yorkshire's cheap fares and the reversal of GM Buses' split in 1993;
  • Former municipal operators (i.e Yellow Buses in Bournemouth, Chester City Transport and Plymouth Citybus);
  • All evening, Sunday and Bank Holiday services from Land's End to John O' Groats;
  • All hospital services and school buses.