A written constitution

The constitution should clearly set out the rights and freedoms of citizens. It should clearly state that the population are sovreign, and that the state is subject to the population. It should enshrine a policy of transparency for the state, so that all citizens can hold the state to account when it comes to voting in elections. The current lack of transparency is unacceptable.

Ideally the powers of the legislature and the executive will be clearly divided, with the legislature being as independent as possible, and able to hold the executive properly to account.

Members of the legislature should be able to be recalled by their electors.

Ideally the constitution should be federalist. We should abolish the idea of devolution, and enshrine Scottish, Welsh, Northern Irish and possibly English (or English regional) parliaments into the constitution. The powers of these regional parliaments should be substantial, and should include primary legislating powers and taxation. 

Ideally the UK parliament will deal only with security and international issues. Changing the constitution would require ratification by the regional parliaments.

Finally the role of the crown should be addressed. There is no reason why the crown need be head of state of the whole federal state. If regions such as Scotland or Wales wished not to have the UK monarch as their head of state then they should be allowed to have representation from a regional president. There is no reason why the monarch should not be Queen of England, but not of Scotland, for example. A provision for referendum regarding replacing the monarch with a directly elected head of state should be included in the constitution.

Why is this idea important?

The constitution should clearly set out the rights and freedoms of citizens. It should clearly state that the population are sovreign, and that the state is subject to the population. It should enshrine a policy of transparency for the state, so that all citizens can hold the state to account when it comes to voting in elections. The current lack of transparency is unacceptable.

Ideally the powers of the legislature and the executive will be clearly divided, with the legislature being as independent as possible, and able to hold the executive properly to account.

Members of the legislature should be able to be recalled by their electors.

Ideally the constitution should be federalist. We should abolish the idea of devolution, and enshrine Scottish, Welsh, Northern Irish and possibly English (or English regional) parliaments into the constitution. The powers of these regional parliaments should be substantial, and should include primary legislating powers and taxation. 

Ideally the UK parliament will deal only with security and international issues. Changing the constitution would require ratification by the regional parliaments.

Finally the role of the crown should be addressed. There is no reason why the crown need be head of state of the whole federal state. If regions such as Scotland or Wales wished not to have the UK monarch as their head of state then they should be allowed to have representation from a regional president. There is no reason why the monarch should not be Queen of England, but not of Scotland, for example. A provision for referendum regarding replacing the monarch with a directly elected head of state should be included in the constitution.

Remove requirement for oath of allegiance to sit in Commons

The law that states that MPs should swear an oath of allegiance to the Queen before being allowed to sit in the Commons is outdated. We live in a democracy where anyone elected as an MP should have the right to take their seat, regardless if they agree with the monarchy system or not.

Why is this idea important?

The law that states that MPs should swear an oath of allegiance to the Queen before being allowed to sit in the Commons is outdated. We live in a democracy where anyone elected as an MP should have the right to take their seat, regardless if they agree with the monarchy system or not.

Why not introduce a codified constitution?

 

A codified constitution, including a Bill of Rights, would give British politics and law the modernisation that it drastically needs. A codified constitution would entrench our civil liberties and certainly make it a lot harder for any future government to change or curtail any of our freedoms. It would also give citizens a comprehensive set of laws, instead of the confusing customs and traditions which our system is currently based on. 

This constitution should be free to obtain and could even be taught on a simplified level to school children, giving the next generation more political understanding which should reduce 'voter apathy' in local and general elections. If school children were taught the laws of the land in school, then a it is more likely for the child to grow up with a strong sense of moral responsibility.

A codified constitution makes passing controversial and unpopular legislation harder for any government, and referendums on a regular basis should be included in this constitution, along with the various political reforms promised by Nick Clegg and the Coalition Government. 

There is no real downside to having a codified constitution in Britain, apart from it may reduce the overall policy making powers of a government if certain parts are entrenched, but as this current government has promised in the pre-election campaigns, it supports giving more power back to the people. 

Why is this idea important?

 

A codified constitution, including a Bill of Rights, would give British politics and law the modernisation that it drastically needs. A codified constitution would entrench our civil liberties and certainly make it a lot harder for any future government to change or curtail any of our freedoms. It would also give citizens a comprehensive set of laws, instead of the confusing customs and traditions which our system is currently based on. 

This constitution should be free to obtain and could even be taught on a simplified level to school children, giving the next generation more political understanding which should reduce 'voter apathy' in local and general elections. If school children were taught the laws of the land in school, then a it is more likely for the child to grow up with a strong sense of moral responsibility.

A codified constitution makes passing controversial and unpopular legislation harder for any government, and referendums on a regular basis should be included in this constitution, along with the various political reforms promised by Nick Clegg and the Coalition Government. 

There is no real downside to having a codified constitution in Britain, apart from it may reduce the overall policy making powers of a government if certain parts are entrenched, but as this current government has promised in the pre-election campaigns, it supports giving more power back to the people. 

Local Government Act 2000

The Local Government Act 2000 made sweeping changes to the constitution and working practices of County and District councils.  It created a leader (or mayor) and cabinet system which is now broadly similar to that of central government.  The leader is empowered to choose his/her own cabinet members, each of whom has significant executive power without recourse to debate or approval by the full council.  This puts enormous power into the hands of the 9 or so members of the executive, which by virtue of the selection process are all of the majority political party.  The large number of elected councillors not so chosen are relegated to seeking positions on one of the scrutiny committees, which have only the ability to make recommendations to the appropriate cabinet member; this member has no obligation to respect or abide by such recommendations, and can only be over-ruled by the full council should such a matter be brought before them by the executive.

Under the previous system, councillors in their committees (comprising members of political or independent persuasion in proportion to the election result) would consider policy issues and put their recommendation to the full council for the vote.

I propose a return to the previous system.

Why is this idea important?

The Local Government Act 2000 made sweeping changes to the constitution and working practices of County and District councils.  It created a leader (or mayor) and cabinet system which is now broadly similar to that of central government.  The leader is empowered to choose his/her own cabinet members, each of whom has significant executive power without recourse to debate or approval by the full council.  This puts enormous power into the hands of the 9 or so members of the executive, which by virtue of the selection process are all of the majority political party.  The large number of elected councillors not so chosen are relegated to seeking positions on one of the scrutiny committees, which have only the ability to make recommendations to the appropriate cabinet member; this member has no obligation to respect or abide by such recommendations, and can only be over-ruled by the full council should such a matter be brought before them by the executive.

Under the previous system, councillors in their committees (comprising members of political or independent persuasion in proportion to the election result) would consider policy issues and put their recommendation to the full council for the vote.

I propose a return to the previous system.

A modern secular state

Religion does not need the special status it currently enjoys within the British state. Quite rightly, we have laws that ban discrimination on the basis of religion or faith. That is sufficient. We have already abolished the common law offences of blasphemy and blasphemous libel in England and Wales, which were long recognised as an anachronism. We should now go further and end the formal establishment of the Anglican Church as the state religion of Britain.

No one should occupy a place in Britain’s legislature on the basis of religious office. There is no objection to holders of religious office being members of either house of Parliament or any other part of government, but they should only win such status through the same democratic processes as everyone else.

We must also repeal or rewrite the laws that require schools to impose a daily act of collective worship upon pupils and we must remove the special privilege given to Christianity within religious education (I understand this to be in the Education Act 1944 as amended by the Education Reform Act 1988 and the School Standards and Framework Act 1998). The removal of anachronistic religious requirements in our education system is a matter of prudent use of funding as well as basic freedoms.
 

Why is this idea important?

Religion does not need the special status it currently enjoys within the British state. Quite rightly, we have laws that ban discrimination on the basis of religion or faith. That is sufficient. We have already abolished the common law offences of blasphemy and blasphemous libel in England and Wales, which were long recognised as an anachronism. We should now go further and end the formal establishment of the Anglican Church as the state religion of Britain.

No one should occupy a place in Britain’s legislature on the basis of religious office. There is no objection to holders of religious office being members of either house of Parliament or any other part of government, but they should only win such status through the same democratic processes as everyone else.

We must also repeal or rewrite the laws that require schools to impose a daily act of collective worship upon pupils and we must remove the special privilege given to Christianity within religious education (I understand this to be in the Education Act 1944 as amended by the Education Reform Act 1988 and the School Standards and Framework Act 1998). The removal of anachronistic religious requirements in our education system is a matter of prudent use of funding as well as basic freedoms.
 

Create a citizen’s veto on legislation.

One of the reasons we have too many petty laws, rules and regulations, is that the vast sway of lawyers & who fill the political ranks are more than happy to “throw law” at a problem (and is it a coincidence that they as lawyers have a nice cushy job lined up working on the law they themselves have created in office if they get kicked out of office?)

Whilst we can't exactly ban lawyers from parliament, we must do more to bring ordinary common sense into parliament and ensure:

  1. law is written in easy to understand English
  2. that law is not written for and by the parliamentary & legal elite
  3. that law is understandable by ordinary people and it really is possible to say: “ignorance of the law is no excuse”. Something which isn't realistic at the moment.

My proposal is to create a citizen's assembly. This assembly will take ordinary chosen by lot from volunteers, and it will have a single power: to veto bad legislation before royal assent.

Whilst it would be very unusual in the UK political culture for a group of citizens to reject law that has been legitimately passed by both the houses of parliament, the very thought that it could happen will undoubtedly focus parliamentarians on the public's need and help stop the "legal mafia" in parliament who so effectively work to "proliferate the verbiage" coming out the back end of the parliamentary system.

Why is this idea important?

One of the reasons we have too many petty laws, rules and regulations, is that the vast sway of lawyers & who fill the political ranks are more than happy to “throw law” at a problem (and is it a coincidence that they as lawyers have a nice cushy job lined up working on the law they themselves have created in office if they get kicked out of office?)

Whilst we can't exactly ban lawyers from parliament, we must do more to bring ordinary common sense into parliament and ensure:

  1. law is written in easy to understand English
  2. that law is not written for and by the parliamentary & legal elite
  3. that law is understandable by ordinary people and it really is possible to say: “ignorance of the law is no excuse”. Something which isn't realistic at the moment.

My proposal is to create a citizen's assembly. This assembly will take ordinary chosen by lot from volunteers, and it will have a single power: to veto bad legislation before royal assent.

Whilst it would be very unusual in the UK political culture for a group of citizens to reject law that has been legitimately passed by both the houses of parliament, the very thought that it could happen will undoubtedly focus parliamentarians on the public's need and help stop the "legal mafia" in parliament who so effectively work to "proliferate the verbiage" coming out the back end of the parliamentary system.

Why not introduce a codified constitution?

A codified constitution, including a Bill of Rights, would give British politics and law the modernisation that it drastically needs. A codified constitution would entrench our civil liberties and certainly make it a lot harder for any future government to change or curtail any of our freedoms. It would also give citizens a comprehensive set of laws, instead of the confusing customs and traditions which our system is currently based on. 

This constitution should be free to obtain and could even be taught on a simplified level to school children, giving the next generation more political understanding which should reduce 'voter apathy' in local and general elections. If school children were taught the laws of the land in school, then a it is more likely for the child to grow up with a strong sense of moral responsibility.

A codified constitution makes passing controversial and unpopular legislation harder for any government, and referendums on a regular basis should be included in this constitution, along with the various political reforms promised by Nick Clegg and the Coalition Government. 

There is no real downside to having a codified constitution in Britain, apart from it may reduce the overall policy making powers of a government if certain parts are entrenched, but as this current government has promised in the pre-election campaigns, it supports giving more power back to the people. 

Why is this idea important?

A codified constitution, including a Bill of Rights, would give British politics and law the modernisation that it drastically needs. A codified constitution would entrench our civil liberties and certainly make it a lot harder for any future government to change or curtail any of our freedoms. It would also give citizens a comprehensive set of laws, instead of the confusing customs and traditions which our system is currently based on. 

This constitution should be free to obtain and could even be taught on a simplified level to school children, giving the next generation more political understanding which should reduce 'voter apathy' in local and general elections. If school children were taught the laws of the land in school, then a it is more likely for the child to grow up with a strong sense of moral responsibility.

A codified constitution makes passing controversial and unpopular legislation harder for any government, and referendums on a regular basis should be included in this constitution, along with the various political reforms promised by Nick Clegg and the Coalition Government. 

There is no real downside to having a codified constitution in Britain, apart from it may reduce the overall policy making powers of a government if certain parts are entrenched, but as this current government has promised in the pre-election campaigns, it supports giving more power back to the people. 

Union Act 1707

Abolish this act  to alow the English to have their own identity with their own government.

For too long the English have had to play second fiddle to the the Scots,Welsh, and N. Irish. eg "The West Lothian Question" (Tam Dalyell ..14 Nov 1977). Also, quote   William Hague in July 1999, " English MP's should have exclusive say over English Laws. People will become increasingly resentful that decisions are being made in England by other people from other parts of the uk on matters that English people that did not have a say on elsewhere….I think it is a dangerous thing to allow resentment to build up in a country. We have to make the rules fair now."

Why is this idea important?

Abolish this act  to alow the English to have their own identity with their own government.

For too long the English have had to play second fiddle to the the Scots,Welsh, and N. Irish. eg "The West Lothian Question" (Tam Dalyell ..14 Nov 1977). Also, quote   William Hague in July 1999, " English MP's should have exclusive say over English Laws. People will become increasingly resentful that decisions are being made in England by other people from other parts of the uk on matters that English people that did not have a say on elsewhere….I think it is a dangerous thing to allow resentment to build up in a country. We have to make the rules fair now."

Political Revamp

House of Lords

Replace current House of Lords with an elected House of Lords based around the traditional counties (Will equal just over 100 lords) and remove the Lords Spiritual. New House of Lords led by Lord Chancellor (Leader of biggest party in House of Lords)

English Parliament

Introduce an English Parliament so to have a Parliament (elected in similar way to the other devolved bodies)  that focuses on England and the problems England faces. Debate the case of Cornwall as it has been consider a "Special case" for devolution. Build parliament in North/North of Centre of England.

Northern Ireland

End mandatory Power sharing so as to give the people of Northern Ireland a Government and Opposition.

British Overseas Territories (BOTs)

Offer BOTs (such as Falkland Isles and Gibraltar) the opportunity to send MPs/Lords to Westminster so they can take part like a devolved nation.

Constitution

Written Constitution, enshrining the rights of the UK and also setting out the Role of the Monarchy, Supreme Court and the UK and Devolved Parliaments

Why is this idea important?

House of Lords

Replace current House of Lords with an elected House of Lords based around the traditional counties (Will equal just over 100 lords) and remove the Lords Spiritual. New House of Lords led by Lord Chancellor (Leader of biggest party in House of Lords)

English Parliament

Introduce an English Parliament so to have a Parliament (elected in similar way to the other devolved bodies)  that focuses on England and the problems England faces. Debate the case of Cornwall as it has been consider a "Special case" for devolution. Build parliament in North/North of Centre of England.

Northern Ireland

End mandatory Power sharing so as to give the people of Northern Ireland a Government and Opposition.

British Overseas Territories (BOTs)

Offer BOTs (such as Falkland Isles and Gibraltar) the opportunity to send MPs/Lords to Westminster so they can take part like a devolved nation.

Constitution

Written Constitution, enshrining the rights of the UK and also setting out the Role of the Monarchy, Supreme Court and the UK and Devolved Parliaments

England/English to be acceptable Nationality on all Documentation

England & the English are the largest group within the United Kingdom whose residents are called 'Brits' yet are not allowed to declare their residency, nationality or language. It is the greatest heritage in the world , desired by millions yet denied to its people by the Government.

Why is this idea important?

England & the English are the largest group within the United Kingdom whose residents are called 'Brits' yet are not allowed to declare their residency, nationality or language. It is the greatest heritage in the world , desired by millions yet denied to its people by the Government.

English parliament for English people.

The English people need their own parliament, much like we have granted to Scotland, Wales & N Ireland, so that we are not misrepresented by MP's who vote one way in their parliament and then the party way in the UK parliament. We do not want to go the EU route of regions. English votes for English MP's for English laws.

Why is this idea important?

The English people need their own parliament, much like we have granted to Scotland, Wales & N Ireland, so that we are not misrepresented by MP's who vote one way in their parliament and then the party way in the UK parliament. We do not want to go the EU route of regions. English votes for English MP's for English laws.

Democratically electing a head of state, making us all more free.

We should democratically elect a head of state, and no longer be 'ruled over' by an unelected, undemocratic monarch merely on the basis of his or her birth.

Why is this idea important?

We should democratically elect a head of state, and no longer be 'ruled over' by an unelected, undemocratic monarch merely on the basis of his or her birth.

protecting our tolerant liberal democracy

 

We currently live in a tolerant, liberal western democracy and we need to enshrine the ethos of our State in law in order to protect it from alien/foreign illiberal and intolerant influences. In order to maintain liberties you have to protect them from interference once they are given.

 

The State should be separate from any religion. Secular Human Rights should always 'trump' religious freedoms, 'non-believers' of religions should be protected from interference from religion. In return adherents of religions must be protected by the State from persecution.

 

Rights come with responsibilities to our tolerant, liberal western democracy. A social contract should be created where no individual or section of society can take assistance from the State without giving to the State, allegiance is to the British Nation and continuing it's freedoms. English should be the only language used, in print and spoken communication, by the state and all it's local and national authorities. Hiding ones face in public must be a crime. Refusal to engage in the Social Contract results in removal of voting rights and if applicable a reexamination of whether residence/citizenship is still legitimate. The aim is to stop sections of society from alienating themselves within the mainstream of society and living in cultural ghettos.

Why is this idea important?

 

We currently live in a tolerant, liberal western democracy and we need to enshrine the ethos of our State in law in order to protect it from alien/foreign illiberal and intolerant influences. In order to maintain liberties you have to protect them from interference once they are given.

 

The State should be separate from any religion. Secular Human Rights should always 'trump' religious freedoms, 'non-believers' of religions should be protected from interference from religion. In return adherents of religions must be protected by the State from persecution.

 

Rights come with responsibilities to our tolerant, liberal western democracy. A social contract should be created where no individual or section of society can take assistance from the State without giving to the State, allegiance is to the British Nation and continuing it's freedoms. English should be the only language used, in print and spoken communication, by the state and all it's local and national authorities. Hiding ones face in public must be a crime. Refusal to engage in the Social Contract results in removal of voting rights and if applicable a reexamination of whether residence/citizenship is still legitimate. The aim is to stop sections of society from alienating themselves within the mainstream of society and living in cultural ghettos.

All Legislation to Have Expiry Date

All Legislation to have expiry dates. Legislation to be broken down into differnt types each with an apprpriate validity period.

Only exceptions Common Law and Written Constituttion approved and or amended by referendum on an all or nothing basis.

Why is this idea important?

All Legislation to have expiry dates. Legislation to be broken down into differnt types each with an apprpriate validity period.

Only exceptions Common Law and Written Constituttion approved and or amended by referendum on an all or nothing basis.