Reduce SMIDSYs

The Highway Code tells us not to park within 10 meters of a junction either side or indeed opposite one. This was at a time when in general vehicles were small I look at Morris minor or Austin A30 or ford Anglia 105s. Since then vehicles have got a lot larger and so consideration needs to be given to increasing the safe distances that vehicles can park at in relation to junctions and freely available vision. I would suggest that 45 ft or more should be considered.

The matter at present was made worse many years ago with the introduction of double yellow lines. which were put in place on certain junctions by local authorities. The purpose of such lines was I believe to give clear vision for drivers to exit at junctions onto main roads usually arterial ones. It would appear, however,by the number of smidsys [ Sorry mate I didn’t se you] collisions that in some order many have failed to do just that. The reason? Simply because they didn’t adopt the 10 meter distance previously mentioned. Some junctions have as little as 2 meters of double yellow lines and therefore we have a situation where drivers now believe that it is lawful to park where those double yellow lines end. That being much closer to the junction than previous legislation as ism advised in the H.C.
Its a danger that has been created by local authorities and one which is easy to recommend. Increase safe visibility particularly of oncoming traffic approaching from the right side of a junction. Increase the double yellow lines to now 45ft or more, taking into account the greater visual obstruction new larger manufactured vehicles cause. With greater clearer visibility and less need for drivers to pull out into oncoming traffic in order to gain a decent view of oncoming traffic there should be fewer accidents at junctions.

We must also remember that with the introduction of 20 mph areas it will have little or no effect on the number of such smidsy.s at junctions as the speed vehicles leave an exit at junctions will remain the same in all cases. and traffic on the main arterial roads will still be travelling at or close to the normal 30 mph speed I limit also.

Why is this idea important?

The Highway Code tells us not to park within 10 meters of a junction either side or indeed opposite one. This was at a time when in general vehicles were small I look at Morris minor or Austin A30 or ford Anglia 105s. Since then vehicles have got a lot larger and so consideration needs to be given to increasing the safe distances that vehicles can park at in relation to junctions and freely available vision. I would suggest that 45 ft or more should be considered.

The matter at present was made worse many years ago with the introduction of double yellow lines. which were put in place on certain junctions by local authorities. The purpose of such lines was I believe to give clear vision for drivers to exit at junctions onto main roads usually arterial ones. It would appear, however,by the number of smidsys [ Sorry mate I didn’t se you] collisions that in some order many have failed to do just that. The reason? Simply because they didn’t adopt the 10 meter distance previously mentioned. Some junctions have as little as 2 meters of double yellow lines and therefore we have a situation where drivers now believe that it is lawful to park where those double yellow lines end. That being much closer to the junction than previous legislation as ism advised in the H.C.
Its a danger that has been created by local authorities and one which is easy to recommend. Increase safe visibility particularly of oncoming traffic approaching from the right side of a junction. Increase the double yellow lines to now 45ft or more, taking into account the greater visual obstruction new larger manufactured vehicles cause. With greater clearer visibility and less need for drivers to pull out into oncoming traffic in order to gain a decent view of oncoming traffic there should be fewer accidents at junctions.

We must also remember that with the introduction of 20 mph areas it will have little or no effect on the number of such smidsy.s at junctions as the speed vehicles leave an exit at junctions will remain the same in all cases. and traffic on the main arterial roads will still be travelling at or close to the normal 30 mph speed I limit also.

Abolish Cycling on the footway (pavement) is an offence under Section 72 ofthe Highways Act 1835 as amended by Section 85 (1) of the Local GovernmentAct 1888

this law dates back to 19th century when it made sense as people walked everywhere and was the only way to go from A to B.

These days pavements are hardly used by people as nowdays everyone drives. In addition, roads are very dangerous for cyclists as drivers dont leave enough space and can easily clip the handles with their side mirrors.

Looking at the Continent, no one seem to have an issue with cycling on the pavement. Duch seem to cope very well with cycling on the pavement so the Germans the French, Italians, Spanish, etc.

So this is an out dated law which doesn not make sense anymore.

Sometimes I can see people being stop for cycling along the pedestrianised high street when there is hardly anyone around. To me this does not make sense.

Same applies when cycling along the promenade. It is ok to cycle on a sunny Sunday with loads of people in May but it is not ok to cycle during the week in a cloudy day in July when there are few people walking on the beach……. 

Why is this idea important?

this law dates back to 19th century when it made sense as people walked everywhere and was the only way to go from A to B.

These days pavements are hardly used by people as nowdays everyone drives. In addition, roads are very dangerous for cyclists as drivers dont leave enough space and can easily clip the handles with their side mirrors.

Looking at the Continent, no one seem to have an issue with cycling on the pavement. Duch seem to cope very well with cycling on the pavement so the Germans the French, Italians, Spanish, etc.

So this is an out dated law which doesn not make sense anymore.

Sometimes I can see people being stop for cycling along the pedestrianised high street when there is hardly anyone around. To me this does not make sense.

Same applies when cycling along the promenade. It is ok to cycle on a sunny Sunday with loads of people in May but it is not ok to cycle during the week in a cloudy day in July when there are few people walking on the beach……. 

Make Cyclists Register as Road Users

Cyclists should be required to register and display plates to use the roads. This way when they break the highway code they can be traced either through cctv camera records or witness statements.

The behaviour of cyclists in London is of particular concern having taken my life in my own hands to cross a zebra crossing which pedal cyclists completely ignoring the rules. They have no identifable markings and so are impossible to trace.

I wouldn't apply a charge for registration but I would apply fixed penalty notices to the registered owner for infringements and fine those who are not registered. The DVLA could handle these records and this would also make stolen bikes easier to trace too.

Why is this idea important?

Cyclists should be required to register and display plates to use the roads. This way when they break the highway code they can be traced either through cctv camera records or witness statements.

The behaviour of cyclists in London is of particular concern having taken my life in my own hands to cross a zebra crossing which pedal cyclists completely ignoring the rules. They have no identifable markings and so are impossible to trace.

I wouldn't apply a charge for registration but I would apply fixed penalty notices to the registered owner for infringements and fine those who are not registered. The DVLA could handle these records and this would also make stolen bikes easier to trace too.