Opt out of European fisheries policy

The U.K. would almost certainly be much better off without full membership of the European Union. However immediate total withdrawal would cause too many problems. Piecemeal withdrawal by opting out of one area at a time would more practical.

We would no doubt be told by Brussels that we may not. However the Queen in Parliament has the power to repeal legislation and if necessary abrogate treaties.

As a start we should opt out of the the common fisheries policy that has all but destroyed the British fishing industry, and caused huge  losses of fish stocks. We should follow the example of Iceland, among others, to claim maximum territorial waters reserved for our fishermen. We need to set up large fishing free zones to allow stocks to recover and spread out from them. Other nations have tried this and it works. The few areas in U.K. waters where this has been tried on a small scale have also been successful.

If we can successfully revive our fishing fleets it would not only provide a lot of employment  in fishing, but also bring increased prosperity to many harbour towns.

Why is this idea important?

The U.K. would almost certainly be much better off without full membership of the European Union. However immediate total withdrawal would cause too many problems. Piecemeal withdrawal by opting out of one area at a time would more practical.

We would no doubt be told by Brussels that we may not. However the Queen in Parliament has the power to repeal legislation and if necessary abrogate treaties.

As a start we should opt out of the the common fisheries policy that has all but destroyed the British fishing industry, and caused huge  losses of fish stocks. We should follow the example of Iceland, among others, to claim maximum territorial waters reserved for our fishermen. We need to set up large fishing free zones to allow stocks to recover and spread out from them. Other nations have tried this and it works. The few areas in U.K. waters where this has been tried on a small scale have also been successful.

If we can successfully revive our fishing fleets it would not only provide a lot of employment  in fishing, but also bring increased prosperity to many harbour towns.

Trapping Licence for Crayfish (American Red Signal)

I think the need to obtain a trapping licence in order to catch American Red Signal Crayfish should be abolished and people should be activly incouraged to catch and eat them. I am a fisherman and my local river the Lee is full of them. I have copied the enviromental damage that these are causing below but also from a fishermans point of view they are making fishing in a lot of rivers and lakes in England almost impossible due to the fact that Crayfish will chew off any bait fished on the lake/river bed. A lot of clubs employ people to trap and remove them from thier waters but even this does not even make a dent in their population.

Environmental Impact

The signal crayfish has had a significant impact on the ecosystems it has colonised in Great Britain. It is a fast growing, highly fecund, aggressive, veracious species, which has few natural predators once it reaches maturity. Being omnivorous they will eat most small aquatic fauna and flora. Signal crayfish burrow, causing extensive damage to riparian verges and subsequently to the whole ecosystem. They predate on and out-compete a number of native species, including several environmentally important fish such as bullheads and stone loach, amphibians, and invertebrate species. Of particular note is the white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes), the only native crayfish species in the U.K. The white-clawed crayfish has been in significant decline in parts of England for some time. This can be attributed to a number of factors, such as pollution and habitat degradation, but an increasingly significant factor has been directcompetition and predation by signal crayfish. To compound the situation further, North American crayfish species, including the signal crayfish, carry a fungal infection called the crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci), which is lethal to European crayfish (including our native white-clawed crayfish) and has resulted in their eradication from a number of waters in England. The presence of signal crayfish places a major restriction on national efforts to protect and rehabilitate our native crayfish species.

 

Why is this idea important?

I think the need to obtain a trapping licence in order to catch American Red Signal Crayfish should be abolished and people should be activly incouraged to catch and eat them. I am a fisherman and my local river the Lee is full of them. I have copied the enviromental damage that these are causing below but also from a fishermans point of view they are making fishing in a lot of rivers and lakes in England almost impossible due to the fact that Crayfish will chew off any bait fished on the lake/river bed. A lot of clubs employ people to trap and remove them from thier waters but even this does not even make a dent in their population.

Environmental Impact

The signal crayfish has had a significant impact on the ecosystems it has colonised in Great Britain. It is a fast growing, highly fecund, aggressive, veracious species, which has few natural predators once it reaches maturity. Being omnivorous they will eat most small aquatic fauna and flora. Signal crayfish burrow, causing extensive damage to riparian verges and subsequently to the whole ecosystem. They predate on and out-compete a number of native species, including several environmentally important fish such as bullheads and stone loach, amphibians, and invertebrate species. Of particular note is the white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes), the only native crayfish species in the U.K. The white-clawed crayfish has been in significant decline in parts of England for some time. This can be attributed to a number of factors, such as pollution and habitat degradation, but an increasingly significant factor has been directcompetition and predation by signal crayfish. To compound the situation further, North American crayfish species, including the signal crayfish, carry a fungal infection called the crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci), which is lethal to European crayfish (including our native white-clawed crayfish) and has resulted in their eradication from a number of waters in England. The presence of signal crayfish places a major restriction on national efforts to protect and rehabilitate our native crayfish species.

 

Leave the EU – that should stop most of the daft, expensive legislation

Leaving the EU should stop most of the daft, expensive legislation which this site was set up to do. Most of the ideas proposed on this site would be impossible to repeal because the are binding on our government. Euro diktat has precedence over UK law in many cases.

Most of our legislation is now directed from Brussels. The government you elect here in the UK can rarely do anything about laws, regulations and bureacracy from the EU. Most of these things have been created after lobbying by special interest groups or big business. They have the deep pockets to employ specialist PR agents who – at best – wine and dine the EU bureacrats.

Even where the legislations sounds to be positive, it is usually at enormous cost.

Every year, thousands of new rules and regulations are published producing a monumental nuisance for almost every organisation in the country.

Some we know are EU-inspired, but other laws are less well known as EU in origin. In fact most of our legislation comes from over the water.  But the majority of EU laws and regulations are expensive to implement and monitor, and ineffective in not producing the intended effect; some are harmful, and of course some actually useful.

Why is this idea important?

Leaving the EU should stop most of the daft, expensive legislation which this site was set up to do. Most of the ideas proposed on this site would be impossible to repeal because the are binding on our government. Euro diktat has precedence over UK law in many cases.

Most of our legislation is now directed from Brussels. The government you elect here in the UK can rarely do anything about laws, regulations and bureacracy from the EU. Most of these things have been created after lobbying by special interest groups or big business. They have the deep pockets to employ specialist PR agents who – at best – wine and dine the EU bureacrats.

Even where the legislations sounds to be positive, it is usually at enormous cost.

Every year, thousands of new rules and regulations are published producing a monumental nuisance for almost every organisation in the country.

Some we know are EU-inspired, but other laws are less well known as EU in origin. In fact most of our legislation comes from over the water.  But the majority of EU laws and regulations are expensive to implement and monitor, and ineffective in not producing the intended effect; some are harmful, and of course some actually useful.