Freedom?

In Britain the goverment are fond of using words like freedom, in reality what freedom do we really have? We are told what we can say or write, in our schools we are told what we can eat, we are virtually told what we can think. We have speed cameras spying on us we have number plate recognition cameras, we have cameras spying on parking, we have cameras spying on us in the High Street all under the guise of "For Your Safety", "For Your Protection". I am not against cameras in accident black spots or near school entrances but in moderation. I think the Goverment should rethink laws that impinge on personal opinions or preferences. Local Councils and Police should rethink their distribution of cameras and get ride of most of them that are simply just money raisers or spies.

Why is this idea important?

In Britain the goverment are fond of using words like freedom, in reality what freedom do we really have? We are told what we can say or write, in our schools we are told what we can eat, we are virtually told what we can think. We have speed cameras spying on us we have number plate recognition cameras, we have cameras spying on parking, we have cameras spying on us in the High Street all under the guise of "For Your Safety", "For Your Protection". I am not against cameras in accident black spots or near school entrances but in moderation. I think the Goverment should rethink laws that impinge on personal opinions or preferences. Local Councils and Police should rethink their distribution of cameras and get ride of most of them that are simply just money raisers or spies.

A Law to replace Stop and Search

Now that the Stop and Search Law has been abandoned (Jul 2010) there is nothing to tackle the suspicion of terrorists walking the streets.   In times of heightened security the police are powerless to act until after the event when possibly tens of people have been killed or maimed.

Therefore a less intrusive act is necessary.   No innocent likes to be frisked especially because of your colour that you are being targetted.

The idea would be to change that law to 'Stop and Question'.     If the answers do not satisfy the policeman the person could be taken to the station to be further questioned.

Why is this idea important?

Now that the Stop and Search Law has been abandoned (Jul 2010) there is nothing to tackle the suspicion of terrorists walking the streets.   In times of heightened security the police are powerless to act until after the event when possibly tens of people have been killed or maimed.

Therefore a less intrusive act is necessary.   No innocent likes to be frisked especially because of your colour that you are being targetted.

The idea would be to change that law to 'Stop and Question'.     If the answers do not satisfy the policeman the person could be taken to the station to be further questioned.

What is Liberty?

For me, the idea of liberty is, like for so many others, not exactly clear. We know it best when we don't have it. Maybe that is what it is, an absence:

  • No spy cameras looking over my shoulder all the time
  • No government surveillance of my correspondence via email
  • Being able to have a fag in a pub and not being considered a criminal
  • Being able to walk around and not have to present 'papers' or an ID card to the police
  • Not having  bullying government instruction over the minutiae of everyday life

My idea?

Every government minister should be compelled to read two books:

John Stuart Mill's 'On Liberty' (1859). This discusses the nature of liberty and the limits of society's power over the individual.

Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville; how a radical democracy, The USA,  in the 1830's  had organised itself; before it was a superpower, while it was still struggling.

We now have struggles; must we abandon liberty?

There are some bright ideas in the coalition programme promoting liberty; electoral reform being one.

The regime of austerity and cuts I abhor, this is just Tory triumphalism overcoming common sense, and will be anti libertarian when they are forced through in the teeth of energetic opposition. This will be when HMG's commitment to liberty will be tested!

ranter

Why is this idea important?

For me, the idea of liberty is, like for so many others, not exactly clear. We know it best when we don't have it. Maybe that is what it is, an absence:

  • No spy cameras looking over my shoulder all the time
  • No government surveillance of my correspondence via email
  • Being able to have a fag in a pub and not being considered a criminal
  • Being able to walk around and not have to present 'papers' or an ID card to the police
  • Not having  bullying government instruction over the minutiae of everyday life

My idea?

Every government minister should be compelled to read two books:

John Stuart Mill's 'On Liberty' (1859). This discusses the nature of liberty and the limits of society's power over the individual.

Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville; how a radical democracy, The USA,  in the 1830's  had organised itself; before it was a superpower, while it was still struggling.

We now have struggles; must we abandon liberty?

There are some bright ideas in the coalition programme promoting liberty; electoral reform being one.

The regime of austerity and cuts I abhor, this is just Tory triumphalism overcoming common sense, and will be anti libertarian when they are forced through in the teeth of energetic opposition. This will be when HMG's commitment to liberty will be tested!

ranter

Stop & search with no suspicion

This sort of thing proved useless in the past through inappropriate and over the top use against ethnic minorities.  It caused massive ill feeling between those people and the police which has never been resolved.  There must be an appropriate reason for it and it must be done in a respectful professional way.

 

Why is this idea important?

This sort of thing proved useless in the past through inappropriate and over the top use against ethnic minorities.  It caused massive ill feeling between those people and the police which has never been resolved.  There must be an appropriate reason for it and it must be done in a respectful professional way.

 

Repeal or amend the smoking ban

This must be the most socially divisive legislation ever enacted by a British Government. I find it ironic that the first government to enact such legislation in my lifetime was Nazi Germany, and the present German courts have declared a ban in small bars unconstitutional. Pubs in this country are closing at the rate of 40 a week, something must be done to rectify this appalling situation. 

Why is this idea important?

This must be the most socially divisive legislation ever enacted by a British Government. I find it ironic that the first government to enact such legislation in my lifetime was Nazi Germany, and the present German courts have declared a ban in small bars unconstitutional. Pubs in this country are closing at the rate of 40 a week, something must be done to rectify this appalling situation. 

Repeal the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992

The right to join a trade union, and the right to strike, are as fundamental as free speech. If you don't have them, you're not an employee but a serf, and a society that outlaws strikes isn't free.  Where individual bargaining power is weak – perhaps because the employer is a quasi-monopoly purchaser of an employee's particular skill, collective bargaining power is all that employees have.

Yet the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992 makes strikes, in effect, illegal.

Why is this idea important?

The right to join a trade union, and the right to strike, are as fundamental as free speech. If you don't have them, you're not an employee but a serf, and a society that outlaws strikes isn't free.  Where individual bargaining power is weak – perhaps because the employer is a quasi-monopoly purchaser of an employee's particular skill, collective bargaining power is all that employees have.

Yet the Trade Union and Labour Relations (Consolidation) Act 1992 makes strikes, in effect, illegal.

Chuggers (Charity Muggers)

Any chance we can get the chuggers off the streets.  I have to run a gaultlet of them every morning to get to work and then they try to get me again on the way home. 

 

I do not object to normal charity collection and I even sometimes give when I'm not broke but the constant harrassment by artificially cheerful drama students earning commission is bringing to light worrying levels of anti-social undercurrent.

Why is this idea important?

Any chance we can get the chuggers off the streets.  I have to run a gaultlet of them every morning to get to work and then they try to get me again on the way home. 

 

I do not object to normal charity collection and I even sometimes give when I'm not broke but the constant harrassment by artificially cheerful drama students earning commission is bringing to light worrying levels of anti-social undercurrent.

New Social Liberties By the Coalition Government

The proposal by the coalition government is surely a step in the right direction, though it needs I feel to be watch, as words do not always become actions and policies.

Somehow I am rather concerned about the idea of having 'British Liberties' and not following the Human Right Act, I do not think that we can actually just allow the UK to fade away from the HRA.

This would be very dangerous and also a very big contradiction with the coalition government's proposal to re-intruduce fairer civil liberties, stop ID cards and all other proposals and promises they have made to us.

Moody56

Why is this idea important?

The proposal by the coalition government is surely a step in the right direction, though it needs I feel to be watch, as words do not always become actions and policies.

Somehow I am rather concerned about the idea of having 'British Liberties' and not following the Human Right Act, I do not think that we can actually just allow the UK to fade away from the HRA.

This would be very dangerous and also a very big contradiction with the coalition government's proposal to re-intruduce fairer civil liberties, stop ID cards and all other proposals and promises they have made to us.

Moody56

A fair trial is a fundamental right

If evidence exists then the person should have a trial.  Even Winston Churchill was keen to end any detention without trial very soon after WW2. 

Trial before a jury is a fundamental right in the UK.  

Why is this idea important?

If evidence exists then the person should have a trial.  Even Winston Churchill was keen to end any detention without trial very soon after WW2. 

Trial before a jury is a fundamental right in the UK.  

Here’s my list of laws to repeal or modify

 

Dear Mr Clegg

The previous government was careless of our ancient freedoms and rights. It was probably the most authoritarian government since Pitt’s administration of the 1790s. Freedom of speech, assembly and thought have been violated by legislation brought in by the Blair/Brown governments. The police have used measures designed to curb terrorist acts in normal police work. The state prosecutor has shown an unwelcome, but wholly predictable, appetite for non-jury trials. Surveillance has become the default behaviour of the State be it through the proliferation of CCTV, wire taps and interception of communication. There is no effective oversight of these activities. Like much (that is admirable) in the British state it depends on goodwill, adherence to convention and the exercise of conscience to ensure no abuse. Sadly for our country the previous government was almost wholly negligent of those characteristics, and I say that as someone who voted for Blair. The result is a break in trust with the people that I hope is not irreparable.

Simon H

Why is this idea important?

 

Dear Mr Clegg

The previous government was careless of our ancient freedoms and rights. It was probably the most authoritarian government since Pitt’s administration of the 1790s. Freedom of speech, assembly and thought have been violated by legislation brought in by the Blair/Brown governments. The police have used measures designed to curb terrorist acts in normal police work. The state prosecutor has shown an unwelcome, but wholly predictable, appetite for non-jury trials. Surveillance has become the default behaviour of the State be it through the proliferation of CCTV, wire taps and interception of communication. There is no effective oversight of these activities. Like much (that is admirable) in the British state it depends on goodwill, adherence to convention and the exercise of conscience to ensure no abuse. Sadly for our country the previous government was almost wholly negligent of those characteristics, and I say that as someone who voted for Blair. The result is a break in trust with the people that I hope is not irreparable.

Simon H

Dealing with Binge Drinking

Binge Drinking is a problem but it seems the standard view of let’s make things more expensive is not the right way. Some of the recent suggestions about banning cheap alcohol etc only go to punish the majority of responsible drinkers due to the stupidity of the minority and reducing drinking hours again punishes everyone for the stupidity of the minority. I suggest a stronger stance is taking on those that break the law or should I say commit a minor offence such as drunk and disorderly. To achieve this I think a few minor changes could be made to the current legal system to provide a more suitable and cost effective way to deal with not only this but other minor offenses.

 

  1. Create (if it does not exist) a minor offences court system. This would be a minimal court with a judge or other suitable person who is able to pass law. And several court officials to represent both defence and prosecution aspects.

These would deal with minor offences and would be limited to what punishments they can award. Mainly covering pre-defined fines, community service and curfews by the use of ankle tags. If they feel an offense is more serious, they would refer it to a higher court to deal with.

 

  1. Give the Police more discretional powers to deal with minor offences, as they see fits the circumstances of the situation. There powers would allow them to give out warnings, police cautions and pre-defined fines. Very similar to what they already can do but make sure there is minimal paper work needed to cover this. Or a team within each police station that purely deals with the administration aspect, to allow police officers to be on the street and not stuck at a desk. That said if they feel they are dealing with a minor offence that is a bit more serious or a repeat offender, they could still pass this to the minor offence court for a higher punishment.

So how to deal with binge drinking.

If a person is causing problems due to excessive alcohol, the police have several options to deal with this. They give a warning or a fixed fine (£60 sounds the norm). If a fixed fine the person has 28 days to appeal and that is dealt with in the minor court. All they need is a statement from the person and from the police and they make the decision. If guilty the fine stands and the person also covers court costs at a standard sensible set rate. If found not guilty then it is dismissed and removed from their record.

For repeat offenders, then the police have the option to give a police caution or additional (£60) fines up to a maximum of 3 times. After this it is an automatic referral to minor court and the normal next stage would be Community Service. A good job would be cleaning the streets in their local town early on a weekend morning after the mess created from night outs. They should wear orange overalls that say community service on the back or something like that so people can easily see they are doing community service. The minor court could also award mandatory sessions to look into if the person has some kind of alcohol addiction and if help is needed to overcome that. Again they could get up to 3 lots of community service, starting at something like 10 hours and increasing to 50 then 100. If this person continues to offend then the next stage is curfew. Again 3 times, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and restrict them so they are not allowed to go out on a night drinking in town. If they break curfew then that is dealt with the same way as any other instance of this. If they still continue to repeat offend then a prison sentence, which is a bit extreme but they will have had plenty of chance to mend their ways before now.

As these would be classed as minor offences if a person mends their ways, then the offences are dismissed and removed from their police record after a certain period of time.

Cautions, fines – dismissed and removed after 3 months of not re-offending

Community Service – dismissed and removed after 6 months of not re-offending

Curfew – dismissed and removed after 1 year of not re-offending

Why is this idea important?

Binge Drinking is a problem but it seems the standard view of let’s make things more expensive is not the right way. Some of the recent suggestions about banning cheap alcohol etc only go to punish the majority of responsible drinkers due to the stupidity of the minority and reducing drinking hours again punishes everyone for the stupidity of the minority. I suggest a stronger stance is taking on those that break the law or should I say commit a minor offence such as drunk and disorderly. To achieve this I think a few minor changes could be made to the current legal system to provide a more suitable and cost effective way to deal with not only this but other minor offenses.

 

  1. Create (if it does not exist) a minor offences court system. This would be a minimal court with a judge or other suitable person who is able to pass law. And several court officials to represent both defence and prosecution aspects.

These would deal with minor offences and would be limited to what punishments they can award. Mainly covering pre-defined fines, community service and curfews by the use of ankle tags. If they feel an offense is more serious, they would refer it to a higher court to deal with.

 

  1. Give the Police more discretional powers to deal with minor offences, as they see fits the circumstances of the situation. There powers would allow them to give out warnings, police cautions and pre-defined fines. Very similar to what they already can do but make sure there is minimal paper work needed to cover this. Or a team within each police station that purely deals with the administration aspect, to allow police officers to be on the street and not stuck at a desk. That said if they feel they are dealing with a minor offence that is a bit more serious or a repeat offender, they could still pass this to the minor offence court for a higher punishment.

So how to deal with binge drinking.

If a person is causing problems due to excessive alcohol, the police have several options to deal with this. They give a warning or a fixed fine (£60 sounds the norm). If a fixed fine the person has 28 days to appeal and that is dealt with in the minor court. All they need is a statement from the person and from the police and they make the decision. If guilty the fine stands and the person also covers court costs at a standard sensible set rate. If found not guilty then it is dismissed and removed from their record.

For repeat offenders, then the police have the option to give a police caution or additional (£60) fines up to a maximum of 3 times. After this it is an automatic referral to minor court and the normal next stage would be Community Service. A good job would be cleaning the streets in their local town early on a weekend morning after the mess created from night outs. They should wear orange overalls that say community service on the back or something like that so people can easily see they are doing community service. The minor court could also award mandatory sessions to look into if the person has some kind of alcohol addiction and if help is needed to overcome that. Again they could get up to 3 lots of community service, starting at something like 10 hours and increasing to 50 then 100. If this person continues to offend then the next stage is curfew. Again 3 times, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and restrict them so they are not allowed to go out on a night drinking in town. If they break curfew then that is dealt with the same way as any other instance of this. If they still continue to repeat offend then a prison sentence, which is a bit extreme but they will have had plenty of chance to mend their ways before now.

As these would be classed as minor offences if a person mends their ways, then the offences are dismissed and removed from their police record after a certain period of time.

Cautions, fines – dismissed and removed after 3 months of not re-offending

Community Service – dismissed and removed after 6 months of not re-offending

Curfew – dismissed and removed after 1 year of not re-offending

Trapping Licence for Crayfish (American Red Signal)

I think the need to obtain a trapping licence in order to catch American Red Signal Crayfish should be abolished and people should be activly incouraged to catch and eat them. I am a fisherman and my local river the Lee is full of them. I have copied the enviromental damage that these are causing below but also from a fishermans point of view they are making fishing in a lot of rivers and lakes in England almost impossible due to the fact that Crayfish will chew off any bait fished on the lake/river bed. A lot of clubs employ people to trap and remove them from thier waters but even this does not even make a dent in their population.

Environmental Impact

The signal crayfish has had a significant impact on the ecosystems it has colonised in Great Britain. It is a fast growing, highly fecund, aggressive, veracious species, which has few natural predators once it reaches maturity. Being omnivorous they will eat most small aquatic fauna and flora. Signal crayfish burrow, causing extensive damage to riparian verges and subsequently to the whole ecosystem. They predate on and out-compete a number of native species, including several environmentally important fish such as bullheads and stone loach, amphibians, and invertebrate species. Of particular note is the white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes), the only native crayfish species in the U.K. The white-clawed crayfish has been in significant decline in parts of England for some time. This can be attributed to a number of factors, such as pollution and habitat degradation, but an increasingly significant factor has been directcompetition and predation by signal crayfish. To compound the situation further, North American crayfish species, including the signal crayfish, carry a fungal infection called the crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci), which is lethal to European crayfish (including our native white-clawed crayfish) and has resulted in their eradication from a number of waters in England. The presence of signal crayfish places a major restriction on national efforts to protect and rehabilitate our native crayfish species.

 

Why is this idea important?

I think the need to obtain a trapping licence in order to catch American Red Signal Crayfish should be abolished and people should be activly incouraged to catch and eat them. I am a fisherman and my local river the Lee is full of them. I have copied the enviromental damage that these are causing below but also from a fishermans point of view they are making fishing in a lot of rivers and lakes in England almost impossible due to the fact that Crayfish will chew off any bait fished on the lake/river bed. A lot of clubs employ people to trap and remove them from thier waters but even this does not even make a dent in their population.

Environmental Impact

The signal crayfish has had a significant impact on the ecosystems it has colonised in Great Britain. It is a fast growing, highly fecund, aggressive, veracious species, which has few natural predators once it reaches maturity. Being omnivorous they will eat most small aquatic fauna and flora. Signal crayfish burrow, causing extensive damage to riparian verges and subsequently to the whole ecosystem. They predate on and out-compete a number of native species, including several environmentally important fish such as bullheads and stone loach, amphibians, and invertebrate species. Of particular note is the white-clawed crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes), the only native crayfish species in the U.K. The white-clawed crayfish has been in significant decline in parts of England for some time. This can be attributed to a number of factors, such as pollution and habitat degradation, but an increasingly significant factor has been directcompetition and predation by signal crayfish. To compound the situation further, North American crayfish species, including the signal crayfish, carry a fungal infection called the crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci), which is lethal to European crayfish (including our native white-clawed crayfish) and has resulted in their eradication from a number of waters in England. The presence of signal crayfish places a major restriction on national efforts to protect and rehabilitate our native crayfish species.

 

Control the growing tide of SURVEILLANCE in the UK.

Highly controlled surveillance (e-communication, cameras etc) is rightly an important part of crime fighting and is vital to protect our society from people who wish us harm.

However, it needs to be strictly controlled and we need to stop the "purpose creep" where monitoring techniques designed to control one threat are, after commissioning, used to monitor behaviour they were never intended for.

To start with, we need strict legislation that says precisely how data can be used from different devices. Uses which aren't approved should be prevented by physical design of the devices and / or networks or, if this can't be guaranteed, the devices should not be installed. 

There are way too many security cameras (to name only one method of surveillance)  'collecting data' the use of which is too loosely regulated. This is a silent tumour eating away at our democratic rights and providing the basis for the flourishing of evil. Sounds alarmist but repression isn't new in the world and it always has to start somewhere.

Why is this idea important?

Highly controlled surveillance (e-communication, cameras etc) is rightly an important part of crime fighting and is vital to protect our society from people who wish us harm.

However, it needs to be strictly controlled and we need to stop the "purpose creep" where monitoring techniques designed to control one threat are, after commissioning, used to monitor behaviour they were never intended for.

To start with, we need strict legislation that says precisely how data can be used from different devices. Uses which aren't approved should be prevented by physical design of the devices and / or networks or, if this can't be guaranteed, the devices should not be installed. 

There are way too many security cameras (to name only one method of surveillance)  'collecting data' the use of which is too loosely regulated. This is a silent tumour eating away at our democratic rights and providing the basis for the flourishing of evil. Sounds alarmist but repression isn't new in the world and it always has to start somewhere.

Energy companies must pay YOU interest if they hold your money.

Energy companies hold billions of pounds of money of our money.  They are earning profit interest on these holdings.

In the same way that companies can charge interest on outstanding invoices, energy companies should be forced to pay interest on balances on energy accounts (I suggest 5% above BoE base rate)..

Why is this idea important?

Energy companies hold billions of pounds of money of our money.  They are earning profit interest on these holdings.

In the same way that companies can charge interest on outstanding invoices, energy companies should be forced to pay interest on balances on energy accounts (I suggest 5% above BoE base rate)..

Cancel the blanket no smoking laws

The No Smoking laws as they stand can be counter business in leisure locations. I am thinking of pubs, bars and restaurants in particular. Market forces should decide whether a pub, or such establishmant, allows smoking or not. If a non-smoker wishes to drink or eat in a non-smoking environment then he/she is free to patronise such an establishment – the reverse is also true. How many pubs are very much down on turnover through this ban? We know that they are going out of business at an unprecedented rate for one reason or another and the non-smoking laws do not help.

Furthermore – the law that a self employed person cannot smoke in their own vehicle is ridiculous – nearly as silly as that same self employed person, working from a home office, not being able to smoke there either.

Why is this idea important?

The No Smoking laws as they stand can be counter business in leisure locations. I am thinking of pubs, bars and restaurants in particular. Market forces should decide whether a pub, or such establishmant, allows smoking or not. If a non-smoker wishes to drink or eat in a non-smoking environment then he/she is free to patronise such an establishment – the reverse is also true. How many pubs are very much down on turnover through this ban? We know that they are going out of business at an unprecedented rate for one reason or another and the non-smoking laws do not help.

Furthermore – the law that a self employed person cannot smoke in their own vehicle is ridiculous – nearly as silly as that same self employed person, working from a home office, not being able to smoke there either.

Remove the ability of private parking contractors to levy fines

Remove the ability of private parking contractors to obtain private data from government bodies such as the DVLA so as to enable them to levy fines.

Also – on a similar theme – remove from these people the ability to remove motor vehicles from places which they deem to be an inappropriate parking place.

Why is this idea important?

Remove the ability of private parking contractors to obtain private data from government bodies such as the DVLA so as to enable them to levy fines.

Also – on a similar theme – remove from these people the ability to remove motor vehicles from places which they deem to be an inappropriate parking place.

Repeal those parts which enable unwarranted snooping

Repeal those parts of the "anti-terrorism" laws which enable local council personnel, amongst others, to spy upon the population. It is ridiculous to use this legislation for such crimes asa over-loading wheelie bins, leaving bags of donated items outside charity shops overnight and dog owners for not providing their pets with collars and tags.

Why is this idea important?

Repeal those parts of the "anti-terrorism" laws which enable local council personnel, amongst others, to spy upon the population. It is ridiculous to use this legislation for such crimes asa over-loading wheelie bins, leaving bags of donated items outside charity shops overnight and dog owners for not providing their pets with collars and tags.

Cannabis and the European Convention on Human Rights

Article 9 – Freedom of thought, conscience and religion
1. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, and to manifest his religion or belief, in worship, teaching, practice and observance.

2. Freedom to manifest one's religion or beliefs shall be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of public safety, for the protection of public order, health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.
 

 

Article 10 – Freedom of expression
1. Everyone has the right to freedom of expression. This right shall include freedom to hold opinions and to receive and impart information and ideas without interference by public authority and regardless of frontiers. This article shall not prevent States from requiring the licensing of broadcasting, television or cinema enterprises.

2. The exercise of these freedoms, since it carries with it duties and responsibilities, may be subject to such formalities, conditions, restrictions or penalties as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society, in the interests of national security, territorial integrity or public safety, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, for the protection of the reputation or rights of others, for preventing the disclosure of information received in confidence, or for maintaining the authority and impartiality of the judiciary.
 

Why is this idea important?

Article 9 – Freedom of thought, conscience and religion
1. Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief and freedom, either alone or in community with others and in public or private, and to manifest his religion or belief, in worship, teaching, practice and observance.

2. Freedom to manifest one's religion or beliefs shall be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society in the interests of public safety, for the protection of public order, health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others.
 

 

Article 10 – Freedom of expression
1. Everyone has the right to freedom of expression. This right shall include freedom to hold opinions and to receive and impart information and ideas without interference by public authority and regardless of frontiers. This article shall not prevent States from requiring the licensing of broadcasting, television or cinema enterprises.

2. The exercise of these freedoms, since it carries with it duties and responsibilities, may be subject to such formalities, conditions, restrictions or penalties as are prescribed by law and are necessary in a democratic society, in the interests of national security, territorial integrity or public safety, for the prevention of disorder or crime, for the protection of health or morals, for the protection of the reputation or rights of others, for preventing the disclosure of information received in confidence, or for maintaining the authority and impartiality of the judiciary.
 

Get rid of the Human Rights Act

Get rid of the Human Rights Act in the UK….get out of European Laws too and get back to our own Justice, where only the perpetrators of crime are punished.

Also 'cap' compensation' the courts can apply…..and stop us going down the American route of sueing for every penny one can.

Why is this idea important?

Get rid of the Human Rights Act in the UK….get out of European Laws too and get back to our own Justice, where only the perpetrators of crime are punished.

Also 'cap' compensation' the courts can apply…..and stop us going down the American route of sueing for every penny one can.