GMT & BST

I feel the move from BST, to GMT, in late October is well timed but I feel the move from GMT, back to BST, could come in early March, rather than at the end of it. The worst of the cold weather (If not wet weather!!!) is usually over by March and so an extra hour of daylight, at the end of the day, is more is than one in the morning. Relative to the equinox, the move to BST, at the end of March, equates to putting the clocks back in mid September, which would be absurd.

Why is this idea important?

I feel the move from BST, to GMT, in late October is well timed but I feel the move from GMT, back to BST, could come in early March, rather than at the end of it. The worst of the cold weather (If not wet weather!!!) is usually over by March and so an extra hour of daylight, at the end of the day, is more is than one in the morning. Relative to the equinox, the move to BST, at the end of March, equates to putting the clocks back in mid September, which would be absurd.

Change to CET for England Only just call it GMT +1 +2 etc

More light in the winter. Most people in the mornings are going to work, so it does not matter about wheather it is light or not.

The evenings are where it counts.

It would encourage more spending, outdoor activities etc. The Scottish and Welsh may complain about this,so as they want to be independant, after all they have their own Parilmentary system, they can stick to their own changes.

This would apply to England only…no offense to Scotland and Wales there. but i think its the right way forward.

Why is this idea important?

More light in the winter. Most people in the mornings are going to work, so it does not matter about wheather it is light or not.

The evenings are where it counts.

It would encourage more spending, outdoor activities etc. The Scottish and Welsh may complain about this,so as they want to be independant, after all they have their own Parilmentary system, they can stick to their own changes.

This would apply to England only…no offense to Scotland and Wales there. but i think its the right way forward.

Keeping clocks in line with Europe

I would just like to support the recent comments made in the press re aligning our clocks in the UK with those of Europe. Apart from the well publicised safety advantages, it would seem a move which would clearly be popular with the general public in England. Of the dozens of people with whom I have discussed this subject I have yet to meet anyone who is not in favour. I understand that Scottish people are not however in favour. I do not think  that they should have any sort of veto. Firstly they are clearly a minority. Secondly, if they wish to retain the existing hours then why can't they have their own time zone.This works in many other countries (Australia,USA for example).They have their own parliament who could make this decision.  

Why is this idea important?

I would just like to support the recent comments made in the press re aligning our clocks in the UK with those of Europe. Apart from the well publicised safety advantages, it would seem a move which would clearly be popular with the general public in England. Of the dozens of people with whom I have discussed this subject I have yet to meet anyone who is not in favour. I understand that Scottish people are not however in favour. I do not think  that they should have any sort of veto. Firstly they are clearly a minority. Secondly, if they wish to retain the existing hours then why can't they have their own time zone.This works in many other countries (Australia,USA for example).They have their own parliament who could make this decision.  

TRY OUT CENTRAL EUROPEAN TIME IN UK.

Have GMT + 1 hour in winter, GMT + 2 hours in summer. National vote. Suggest that Ireland & Northern Ireland have separate vote but counted as if one country. Also give Scotland separate vote. They may wish to keep current system. This would not be a problem. Or a compromise, GMT + 30 minutes in winter. GMT + 1 hour 30 minutes in summer for whole of UK & IRELAND|.

Why is this idea important?

Have GMT + 1 hour in winter, GMT + 2 hours in summer. National vote. Suggest that Ireland & Northern Ireland have separate vote but counted as if one country. Also give Scotland separate vote. They may wish to keep current system. This would not be a problem. Or a compromise, GMT + 30 minutes in winter. GMT + 1 hour 30 minutes in summer for whole of UK & IRELAND|.

Let’s have a Constant Time All the Year

In the 2nd, world war, the idea was adopted of changing clocks forward one hour in summer, as it was believed that this would help to get munitions workers up early in the morning, to improve arms manufacturing for the war effort.  Now, 10 years into the 21st. century, we are still stuck with this anachronism.  Why? 

Ideas by those defending this clock-fiddling every spring and autumn have included suggestions that it's good for the farmers, or it's safer for schoolchildren, or that it saves daylight.  None of these suggestions stands up to logical scrutiny.  Farmers tend to work all hours of daylight available; schools could benefit children greatly by staggering their hours, so as to avoid the "school run" traffic jams, and adjusting their hours at different times of the year, so as to maximise the use of daylight hours for children who walk or cycle to and from school.  And the daftest argument of all is that of "saving" daylight".  In short, it makes far better sense for different industries & services to make their own arrangements as regards optimum working hours, than to expect the whole nation to change all their clocks twice every year. The number of daylight hours we get is fixed by nature, and you can't get a single second of extra daylight by changing the datum point from which we count zero hours.  Before World War 2, Greenwich Time was our standard, and it still remains the world standard, with local time in each country being referenced as being x hours before or after GMT, now described as UCT. 

People can readily adjust to gradual changes; that is Nature's way.  Abrupt changes enforced on us are not easily adjusted to.  This sudden change every March & every October is accompanied by higher accident rates, disturbed sleep patterns, and a higher suicide rate. 

And let's not be stalled by arguments such as "Oh well, we're waiting for Brussells to decide on a common EU time."  Stuff them!  Let's do what is in our own best interests.

Why is this idea important?

In the 2nd, world war, the idea was adopted of changing clocks forward one hour in summer, as it was believed that this would help to get munitions workers up early in the morning, to improve arms manufacturing for the war effort.  Now, 10 years into the 21st. century, we are still stuck with this anachronism.  Why? 

Ideas by those defending this clock-fiddling every spring and autumn have included suggestions that it's good for the farmers, or it's safer for schoolchildren, or that it saves daylight.  None of these suggestions stands up to logical scrutiny.  Farmers tend to work all hours of daylight available; schools could benefit children greatly by staggering their hours, so as to avoid the "school run" traffic jams, and adjusting their hours at different times of the year, so as to maximise the use of daylight hours for children who walk or cycle to and from school.  And the daftest argument of all is that of "saving" daylight".  In short, it makes far better sense for different industries & services to make their own arrangements as regards optimum working hours, than to expect the whole nation to change all their clocks twice every year. The number of daylight hours we get is fixed by nature, and you can't get a single second of extra daylight by changing the datum point from which we count zero hours.  Before World War 2, Greenwich Time was our standard, and it still remains the world standard, with local time in each country being referenced as being x hours before or after GMT, now described as UCT. 

People can readily adjust to gradual changes; that is Nature's way.  Abrupt changes enforced on us are not easily adjusted to.  This sudden change every March & every October is accompanied by higher accident rates, disturbed sleep patterns, and a higher suicide rate. 

And let's not be stalled by arguments such as "Oh well, we're waiting for Brussells to decide on a common EU time."  Stuff them!  Let's do what is in our own best interests.

An end to British Summer Time

British Summer Time was introduced in 1916 with the idea of encouraging the population to do an extra hour's work during summer evenings and saving fuel for lighting.  As the country has become more industrialised the amount of work we do has a lot less to do with the availability of daylight. The increasing use of low energy lighting also means there are less savings to be made in that area.  Research does show an increase in fatal road accidents during dark Autumn and Winter afternoons but this could be partly due to the sudden change when the clocks go back in October.  A lot could be done to improve this by better street lighting and education about safe driving.

Why is this idea important?

British Summer Time was introduced in 1916 with the idea of encouraging the population to do an extra hour's work during summer evenings and saving fuel for lighting.  As the country has become more industrialised the amount of work we do has a lot less to do with the availability of daylight. The increasing use of low energy lighting also means there are less savings to be made in that area.  Research does show an increase in fatal road accidents during dark Autumn and Winter afternoons but this could be partly due to the sudden change when the clocks go back in October.  A lot could be done to improve this by better street lighting and education about safe driving.

Year Round Retention Of Greenwich Mean Time

Since 1884 the world has taken its time zone from the Universal Meridian at Greenwich.  Although the Royal Observatory was eventually moved out of Greenwich, the Meridian Clock still marks the original location.  Yet, while the rest of the world takes its time zone as being GMT+n and GMT-n, Greenwich, along with the rest of Britain, spends half of the year not using its own time zone.

Why is this idea important?

Since 1884 the world has taken its time zone from the Universal Meridian at Greenwich.  Although the Royal Observatory was eventually moved out of Greenwich, the Meridian Clock still marks the original location.  Yet, while the rest of the world takes its time zone as being GMT+n and GMT-n, Greenwich, along with the rest of Britain, spends half of the year not using its own time zone.