The Rational Triumvirate! Regulate – Educate – Revenue Generate (Legalise Cannabis/NHS Heroin/Decriminalised Possession of All Drugs)

The pursuit of liberty, deficit reduction and a safer society along the way…

Cannabis represents a massive commercial opportunity that up to now has only been available to organised crime. The jobs and tax revenues that would stem from a cafe culture would be a welcome addition to the legal economy, and by definition would be taking money and jobs from the criminal underworld.

Heroin is the most damaging of the illegal drugs. Registering addicts and giving them free heroin in clinics along with clean needles, safe doses and therapy, offers the best value for all of society. A vast amount of the theft and burglary in this country is due to acquisitive crime to fund a heroin addiction. This would virtually disappear with NHS heroin clinics.

We are currently in control (a bit) of the largest heroin producing nation in the world. Perhaps us purchasing the good from the farmers rather than the war lords might go some way to creating some jobs and stability in Afghanistan. There is also a global shortage of medical morphine which would represent a decent export for the country.

Decriminalising possession for personal use of all illegal drugs is simply an attempt to reduce our prison population and free the police from the burden of dealing with such a prevalent, yet victimless crime. It is a liberal and realistic approach to a problem that is not going to go away.

Why is this idea important?

The pursuit of liberty, deficit reduction and a safer society along the way…

Cannabis represents a massive commercial opportunity that up to now has only been available to organised crime. The jobs and tax revenues that would stem from a cafe culture would be a welcome addition to the legal economy, and by definition would be taking money and jobs from the criminal underworld.

Heroin is the most damaging of the illegal drugs. Registering addicts and giving them free heroin in clinics along with clean needles, safe doses and therapy, offers the best value for all of society. A vast amount of the theft and burglary in this country is due to acquisitive crime to fund a heroin addiction. This would virtually disappear with NHS heroin clinics.

We are currently in control (a bit) of the largest heroin producing nation in the world. Perhaps us purchasing the good from the farmers rather than the war lords might go some way to creating some jobs and stability in Afghanistan. There is also a global shortage of medical morphine which would represent a decent export for the country.

Decriminalising possession for personal use of all illegal drugs is simply an attempt to reduce our prison population and free the police from the burden of dealing with such a prevalent, yet victimless crime. It is a liberal and realistic approach to a problem that is not going to go away.

Do NOT decriminalize cannabis…

…LEGALIZE it.

It is important people undrestund the difference between legalizing and decriminalizing.

Legalization is the process of removing a legal prohibition against something which is currently not legal.

Legalization is a process often applied to what are regarded, by those working towards legalization, as victimless crimes, of which one example is the consumption of illegal drugs .

Legalization should be contrasted with decriminalization, which removes criminal charges from an action, but leaves intact associated laws and regulations.

Why is this idea important?

…LEGALIZE it.

It is important people undrestund the difference between legalizing and decriminalizing.

Legalization is the process of removing a legal prohibition against something which is currently not legal.

Legalization is a process often applied to what are regarded, by those working towards legalization, as victimless crimes, of which one example is the consumption of illegal drugs .

Legalization should be contrasted with decriminalization, which removes criminal charges from an action, but leaves intact associated laws and regulations.

Prohibition of drugs causes crime, de-criminalise them!

 

We are all aware that the fight against drug use and abuse over the last 50 years has failed spectacularly, no one can deny this.

We are also aware that the increasing use of drugs illegally has increased the levels of crime and violence to levels not seen in the last 100 years.

The number of public servants, social workers, police, NHS staff etc has risen to levels never required before, this is in response to the attempt to stop the  illegal use of drugs.

The number of people in prisons has exploded, around 84,000 currently.

It would be irresponsible to enact legislation, as proposed by Ken Clarke, to reduce short term prison sentences until the de-criminalisation of drugs is tackled.

Many prisoners are there for petty crime offences to pay for the illegal use of drugs. They will be forced to continue to support their habit / addiction illegally if they are not jailed  and so crime will continue to increase.

It is plainly a nonsense to prohibit drugs, as it would be plainly wrong to end prohibition without a proper structure to allow drug users to avail themselves of drugs legally. 

Now is the time for the Coalition Government to tackle this huge drug issue and put it at the front of our agenda for dealing with many of the problems in our society.

Why is this idea important?

 

We are all aware that the fight against drug use and abuse over the last 50 years has failed spectacularly, no one can deny this.

We are also aware that the increasing use of drugs illegally has increased the levels of crime and violence to levels not seen in the last 100 years.

The number of public servants, social workers, police, NHS staff etc has risen to levels never required before, this is in response to the attempt to stop the  illegal use of drugs.

The number of people in prisons has exploded, around 84,000 currently.

It would be irresponsible to enact legislation, as proposed by Ken Clarke, to reduce short term prison sentences until the de-criminalisation of drugs is tackled.

Many prisoners are there for petty crime offences to pay for the illegal use of drugs. They will be forced to continue to support their habit / addiction illegally if they are not jailed  and so crime will continue to increase.

It is plainly a nonsense to prohibit drugs, as it would be plainly wrong to end prohibition without a proper structure to allow drug users to avail themselves of drugs legally. 

Now is the time for the Coalition Government to tackle this huge drug issue and put it at the front of our agenda for dealing with many of the problems in our society.

LEGAL HEROIN FOR ANYONE WHO WANTS IT

It costs less than the price of a loaf bread for a heroin junkie to get his fixes for the day. Heroin is cheap as dirt. Obtaining it under such a harsh legal system is not, so a junkie is forced into a life of crime. Doctors that become addicted to medical grade opiates, often function perfectly normally for years before they are outed. Its not as bad for you as tobacco or alcohol, provided you have a supply, and once an addict is accustomed to the drug he can be perfectly functional in society.  

Heroin is only expensive because there are armies of police, customs and law enforcement running about pushing up the prices.

The drug dealers do their best to bring the prices back down again, but of course charge a premium for taking the terrible risks they do.

The money they make goes into an uncontrolled violent world, that pays almost zero taxes and contributes almost nothing to society. Its a totally false economy that is stripping billions in cash each year from the real economy.

Why is this idea important?

It costs less than the price of a loaf bread for a heroin junkie to get his fixes for the day. Heroin is cheap as dirt. Obtaining it under such a harsh legal system is not, so a junkie is forced into a life of crime. Doctors that become addicted to medical grade opiates, often function perfectly normally for years before they are outed. Its not as bad for you as tobacco or alcohol, provided you have a supply, and once an addict is accustomed to the drug he can be perfectly functional in society.  

Heroin is only expensive because there are armies of police, customs and law enforcement running about pushing up the prices.

The drug dealers do their best to bring the prices back down again, but of course charge a premium for taking the terrible risks they do.

The money they make goes into an uncontrolled violent world, that pays almost zero taxes and contributes almost nothing to society. Its a totally false economy that is stripping billions in cash each year from the real economy.

legalise, regularise and tax

Drugs are not likely to go away , indeed market for legal 'highs' often produces more harmful substances. My generation(not always open to their parents now mostly pensioners about useage)- like the age of most politicians has mostly invariably tried or been casual user- honesty and a regualarised approach would surely lead to less criminal activity by association and procurement and supply.

Sadly, easy  tabloid demonisation and often press sensationalism and distortion has made talking about drugs and their recreational use – a career and press 'taboo'.

Most gangs related and other illicit activities and some ASB stem from Criminalisation.

We must remember that during the 1980' most of the black economy was taken up the drugs trade and one could almost watch and guess which assets and property investments and lndirectly later pensionfunds,etc.  were assisted by the global free market expansion. So lets not pretend otherwise.

That certain drugs such as heroin and crack have dependancy and expand quickly in economically disadvantaged area is no suprise as is the stealing and violence that becomes part of the street trade. Making drugs-less harmful or moderated in density – 'safer' – the more addidicative ones and carrying health warnings and codes of behaviour thereby- is surely more economic and long term socially regenerative. Tax as per alchohol and cigarettes and raising the legal age to 21 as a staged regularisation would surely offset current health ,dependancy and recuperation scheme costs aswell as taking away from criminal enterprise and anti-social behaviour since prohibitions fosters the street code as alternative to the criminal justice system and associated conventional mores once this divorce occurs by usage or even casual usage.

 Regularisation will in itself be a lenghty process with its own set-backs and pitfalls but must be preferable to the current situation and ,to many, hypocracy of dual standards of morality.

Equally, there will still be associated health concerns and illnessness – but also there will be some who see drugs prohibition  as a means to camoflage economic interest and attacks on human rights and genuine social inclusion by the same token and lack of concern for the common good .

 

Why is this idea important?

Drugs are not likely to go away , indeed market for legal 'highs' often produces more harmful substances. My generation(not always open to their parents now mostly pensioners about useage)- like the age of most politicians has mostly invariably tried or been casual user- honesty and a regualarised approach would surely lead to less criminal activity by association and procurement and supply.

Sadly, easy  tabloid demonisation and often press sensationalism and distortion has made talking about drugs and their recreational use – a career and press 'taboo'.

Most gangs related and other illicit activities and some ASB stem from Criminalisation.

We must remember that during the 1980' most of the black economy was taken up the drugs trade and one could almost watch and guess which assets and property investments and lndirectly later pensionfunds,etc.  were assisted by the global free market expansion. So lets not pretend otherwise.

That certain drugs such as heroin and crack have dependancy and expand quickly in economically disadvantaged area is no suprise as is the stealing and violence that becomes part of the street trade. Making drugs-less harmful or moderated in density – 'safer' – the more addidicative ones and carrying health warnings and codes of behaviour thereby- is surely more economic and long term socially regenerative. Tax as per alchohol and cigarettes and raising the legal age to 21 as a staged regularisation would surely offset current health ,dependancy and recuperation scheme costs aswell as taking away from criminal enterprise and anti-social behaviour since prohibitions fosters the street code as alternative to the criminal justice system and associated conventional mores once this divorce occurs by usage or even casual usage.

 Regularisation will in itself be a lenghty process with its own set-backs and pitfalls but must be preferable to the current situation and ,to many, hypocracy of dual standards of morality.

Equally, there will still be associated health concerns and illnessness – but also there will be some who see drugs prohibition  as a means to camoflage economic interest and attacks on human rights and genuine social inclusion by the same token and lack of concern for the common good .

 

herbal highs

I have a shop in Newcastle upon Tyne city centre that sells "herbal highs" and i feel that instead of banning them they should welcome them. When I first opened four years ago i had a range of party pills which contained the now banned substance BZB or piperazines. There were no reported deaths or indeed bad side affects attributed to these products. In fact after the research I did on them I would have happily preffered my own children to experiment with them rather than take the risk of trying street drugs which are cut with some really nasty things such as ketamine and heroin. A lot of kids want to experiment with drugs at some point and these herbal highs were a safer alternative for them if they felt they had to take anything. BANNING THINGS OUTRIGHT DOES NOT MAKE THEM GO AWAY!!! At least when they were being sold in the shops my staff would not sell them to youngsters under the age of 18 and even if they did find their way to underage kids at least they were safe.  They were no where near as strong or dangerous as the latest batch of "herbals" which have recently had, and quite rightly,  bad press. What the government fails to see is that there is a huge demand for these products and not from your local "smackheads" or junkies but from respectable people from all walks of life, indeed the hard drug users who use street drugs are not interested in the herbals as they dont believe they are  as strong as the street versions. I have many customers who used the cannibanoids found in products such as the Spice incense blends to help them relax after a hard day at the office. I myself have used it to help me to sleep and I do not define myself as a drug user or a menace to society. Now that Spice etc is banned the only place I could find anything similar is to go walking the streets for a bone fide drug dealer and that is something I am not prepared to do…I am NOT a criminal. If the government had left the BZP party products alone they would not be in the mess they are in now. There is such a demand for recreational enhancers  that no matter what  they ban, there will ALWAYS be something new brought to the market. If the BZP's had been left alone no one would have ever heard of Methadrone or naphyrone, meow meow or woof woof. Every time a substance is banned the dealers on the streets know there is a demand and they can still get their hands on the substances and sell them for treble the price and the problem is back out on the streets where I do believe you don't want it!!!. Plant feeders were found in many herbal party pills that have been sold for over three years with no bad press or deaths associated to them. They were made and sold by reputable companies in safe doses, it was only when the pure product found its way onto the shelves that the dangers of high doses of the drug was realised. Now that Methadrone in ALL forms has been banned the government has basically opened the door for stronger and much more dangerous products which will no doubt be banned in the very near future and the cycle will continue. The government is making this a much more difficult problem that it should have ever been but they are so blind they cannot see it. Police it properly, tax it if necassary but please don't just ban things because you think the problems will go away. You are sending the people and their cash back onto the streets where you didnt want it in the first place, I am sorry but that is something I just cannot understand!! You are actually helping the illegal traffic of drugs!!!  Allow reputable dealers to sell the products, just like off lisences, if anyone is found selling to underage people then fine them, prosecute them and make them pay or close them down. Repeal the ban on BZP products and you will find that the demand for these new strong drugs will subside. Most people do not want extra strong substances that are dangerous and if they can find something that gives them the small lift they are looking for it will at least half the problems you are having now. The only people you are helping are the drug dealers on the street

Why is this idea important?

I have a shop in Newcastle upon Tyne city centre that sells "herbal highs" and i feel that instead of banning them they should welcome them. When I first opened four years ago i had a range of party pills which contained the now banned substance BZB or piperazines. There were no reported deaths or indeed bad side affects attributed to these products. In fact after the research I did on them I would have happily preffered my own children to experiment with them rather than take the risk of trying street drugs which are cut with some really nasty things such as ketamine and heroin. A lot of kids want to experiment with drugs at some point and these herbal highs were a safer alternative for them if they felt they had to take anything. BANNING THINGS OUTRIGHT DOES NOT MAKE THEM GO AWAY!!! At least when they were being sold in the shops my staff would not sell them to youngsters under the age of 18 and even if they did find their way to underage kids at least they were safe.  They were no where near as strong or dangerous as the latest batch of "herbals" which have recently had, and quite rightly,  bad press. What the government fails to see is that there is a huge demand for these products and not from your local "smackheads" or junkies but from respectable people from all walks of life, indeed the hard drug users who use street drugs are not interested in the herbals as they dont believe they are  as strong as the street versions. I have many customers who used the cannibanoids found in products such as the Spice incense blends to help them relax after a hard day at the office. I myself have used it to help me to sleep and I do not define myself as a drug user or a menace to society. Now that Spice etc is banned the only place I could find anything similar is to go walking the streets for a bone fide drug dealer and that is something I am not prepared to do…I am NOT a criminal. If the government had left the BZP party products alone they would not be in the mess they are in now. There is such a demand for recreational enhancers  that no matter what  they ban, there will ALWAYS be something new brought to the market. If the BZP's had been left alone no one would have ever heard of Methadrone or naphyrone, meow meow or woof woof. Every time a substance is banned the dealers on the streets know there is a demand and they can still get their hands on the substances and sell them for treble the price and the problem is back out on the streets where I do believe you don't want it!!!. Plant feeders were found in many herbal party pills that have been sold for over three years with no bad press or deaths associated to them. They were made and sold by reputable companies in safe doses, it was only when the pure product found its way onto the shelves that the dangers of high doses of the drug was realised. Now that Methadrone in ALL forms has been banned the government has basically opened the door for stronger and much more dangerous products which will no doubt be banned in the very near future and the cycle will continue. The government is making this a much more difficult problem that it should have ever been but they are so blind they cannot see it. Police it properly, tax it if necassary but please don't just ban things because you think the problems will go away. You are sending the people and their cash back onto the streets where you didnt want it in the first place, I am sorry but that is something I just cannot understand!! You are actually helping the illegal traffic of drugs!!!  Allow reputable dealers to sell the products, just like off lisences, if anyone is found selling to underage people then fine them, prosecute them and make them pay or close them down. Repeal the ban on BZP products and you will find that the demand for these new strong drugs will subside. Most people do not want extra strong substances that are dangerous and if they can find something that gives them the small lift they are looking for it will at least half the problems you are having now. The only people you are helping are the drug dealers on the street

How to generate massive tax revenues while significantly reducing crime and its associated cost?

Let me be clear. This isn’t a revolutionary idea – or even unique. It’s a simple, effective approach that will deliver results. If our Government want raise significant tax revenues, while at the same time reducing monetary and social costs, then it’s time for a fresh approach to drugs policy.

I agree that proscribed drugs can be harmful and that they can even kill you. I agree that some poor souls don’t have a sufficient mental constitution, and have the propensity to ‘loose’ their minds thru experimenting with potentially harmful substances. I’m sure a few folk reading this could cite one or two casualties they’ve known, or even heard of, over the years who are good examples of how drugs ‘can’ mess you up.  (Note: Don’t include media hype here as we all know they’re prone to BS)

But here’s the thing. So many everyday items, household good and social institutions all have the capacity to harm or even kill. It’s a fact that swimming pools are more dangerous to kids than guns but we don’t ban them. In the UK more than 1000 people die every year from falling down stairs, while according to the Office of National Statistics only 897 people died from heroin and methadone in 2008 – isn’t this a lethal substance?. Ironically a much larger percentage of people suffer a fatal acute reaction to peanuts than to MDMA, the active ingredient in Ecstasy, which is a Class A banned substance. Who would consider banning peanuts? Mind you that’s another post perhaps…

I agree that even one person dying is tragic – particularly for the family – but it’s time to get real. Deaths from illicit drugs pale into statistical insignificance compared to alcohol and, of course, tobacco. But we don’t ban them do we? No we apply the only viable strategy, which is to license, regulate and tax these industries. So why don’t we do the same with ‘drugs’ then?

Let me say once again – I’m not advocating drug use of any kind. I whole heartedly believe that ‘recreational’ drugs can be deleterious, especially to young impressionable minds. I would prefer that everyone didn’t need a chemical fix for a bad day or even a bad life. But who’s kidding who here. Millions reach for a cigarette, or a glass of wine, or even slice of cake when their shadow calls.  Unless you’re an enlightened being – and I’m sure you believe you are – I’m afraid you’re with the rest of us aspirers, each with our own ‘drug’ of choice, even if you’re too out of focus to realise.

I wrote to Michael Howard (Home Secretary of the day in 1994 explaining why his policy and ‘war of drugs’ could never work and would therefore end in failure. I could have written it verbatim today and it still would be current and spot on. It’s time for positive action not yesterday’s rhetoric. I think the great Einstein perfectly sums up our counter-productive drug policies when he said, “any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage – to move in the opposite direction”.

Let’s hope Dave and Nick has what it takes.

Why is this idea important?

Let me be clear. This isn’t a revolutionary idea – or even unique. It’s a simple, effective approach that will deliver results. If our Government want raise significant tax revenues, while at the same time reducing monetary and social costs, then it’s time for a fresh approach to drugs policy.

I agree that proscribed drugs can be harmful and that they can even kill you. I agree that some poor souls don’t have a sufficient mental constitution, and have the propensity to ‘loose’ their minds thru experimenting with potentially harmful substances. I’m sure a few folk reading this could cite one or two casualties they’ve known, or even heard of, over the years who are good examples of how drugs ‘can’ mess you up.  (Note: Don’t include media hype here as we all know they’re prone to BS)

But here’s the thing. So many everyday items, household good and social institutions all have the capacity to harm or even kill. It’s a fact that swimming pools are more dangerous to kids than guns but we don’t ban them. In the UK more than 1000 people die every year from falling down stairs, while according to the Office of National Statistics only 897 people died from heroin and methadone in 2008 – isn’t this a lethal substance?. Ironically a much larger percentage of people suffer a fatal acute reaction to peanuts than to MDMA, the active ingredient in Ecstasy, which is a Class A banned substance. Who would consider banning peanuts? Mind you that’s another post perhaps…

I agree that even one person dying is tragic – particularly for the family – but it’s time to get real. Deaths from illicit drugs pale into statistical insignificance compared to alcohol and, of course, tobacco. But we don’t ban them do we? No we apply the only viable strategy, which is to license, regulate and tax these industries. So why don’t we do the same with ‘drugs’ then?

Let me say once again – I’m not advocating drug use of any kind. I whole heartedly believe that ‘recreational’ drugs can be deleterious, especially to young impressionable minds. I would prefer that everyone didn’t need a chemical fix for a bad day or even a bad life. But who’s kidding who here. Millions reach for a cigarette, or a glass of wine, or even slice of cake when their shadow calls.  Unless you’re an enlightened being – and I’m sure you believe you are – I’m afraid you’re with the rest of us aspirers, each with our own ‘drug’ of choice, even if you’re too out of focus to realise.

I wrote to Michael Howard (Home Secretary of the day in 1994 explaining why his policy and ‘war of drugs’ could never work and would therefore end in failure. I could have written it verbatim today and it still would be current and spot on. It’s time for positive action not yesterday’s rhetoric. I think the great Einstein perfectly sums up our counter-productive drug policies when he said, “any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage – to move in the opposite direction”.

Let’s hope Dave and Nick has what it takes.

Reduce taxes on work, increase taxes on debt, drugs, energy

Increase taxes on debt, drugs and energy and reduce income taxes by the same amount.   Legalising drugs would also allow the drug industry's profits to be taxed and reduce the amount of taxpayer money spent on the criminal justice system.

Why is this idea important?

Increase taxes on debt, drugs and energy and reduce income taxes by the same amount.   Legalising drugs would also allow the drug industry's profits to be taxed and reduce the amount of taxpayer money spent on the criminal justice system.

Change laws on drugs

I believe that by legalising drugs would result as follows

1. Taking the control away from drug traffickers

2. Will have an reduce human trafficking because the financial rewards will be impacted ie drug trafficking to finances human trafficking – human trafficking finances drug trafficking

3. A potential source of tax

4. It will also ease the pressure on the nhs to treat patients with drug problems

5. One also control the quality and quantity of drugs

6. Control of price of drugs which cause also help to reduce certain elements of crime ie drug users who steal to finance  drug habits

But what also needs to go hand in hand with the change of law on drugs is a full and franks education on drugs for all .The public must know what are the effects of taking certains and it must explained in a factual manner and unbiased .

Why is this idea important?

I believe that by legalising drugs would result as follows

1. Taking the control away from drug traffickers

2. Will have an reduce human trafficking because the financial rewards will be impacted ie drug trafficking to finances human trafficking – human trafficking finances drug trafficking

3. A potential source of tax

4. It will also ease the pressure on the nhs to treat patients with drug problems

5. One also control the quality and quantity of drugs

6. Control of price of drugs which cause also help to reduce certain elements of crime ie drug users who steal to finance  drug habits

But what also needs to go hand in hand with the change of law on drugs is a full and franks education on drugs for all .The public must know what are the effects of taking certains and it must explained in a factual manner and unbiased .

Legalise and tax hard drugs

The good guys have lost the 'war on drugs'. The winners are international criminal syndicates which are making billions out of smuggled heroin, crack etc and their local sub-contractors.

The losers are:-

–  the poor types who take up these substances and so ruin their lives;

– the ordinary citizens who are robbed and assaulted in the addicts' quest to service their habit;

– the prisons whose resources are overwhelmed by huge numbers of addicts;

– the taxpayers, who fund this entire, futile exercise.

My proposal is that these drugs ought to be sold via pharmacies and bear a tax similar to those on tobacco and alcohol, thus raising millions for the exchequer whilst driving the drugs barons out of business in the UK. Just like tobacco and alcohol they should be available on demand to anyone over 18. I choose pharmacies because, unlike other retailers, they already have secure storage for dangerous drugs.

Those who applaud the nanny state will protest, insisting that unformed young minds would want to try these things out and would be hooked. Certainly that would happen in some cases – but it happens now, so that is no argument.

Einstein defined lunacy as continuing to do the same thing and expecting a different outcome. In those terms we've been lunatics for a generation. Let's try sanity for once.

Why is this idea important?

The good guys have lost the 'war on drugs'. The winners are international criminal syndicates which are making billions out of smuggled heroin, crack etc and their local sub-contractors.

The losers are:-

–  the poor types who take up these substances and so ruin their lives;

– the ordinary citizens who are robbed and assaulted in the addicts' quest to service their habit;

– the prisons whose resources are overwhelmed by huge numbers of addicts;

– the taxpayers, who fund this entire, futile exercise.

My proposal is that these drugs ought to be sold via pharmacies and bear a tax similar to those on tobacco and alcohol, thus raising millions for the exchequer whilst driving the drugs barons out of business in the UK. Just like tobacco and alcohol they should be available on demand to anyone over 18. I choose pharmacies because, unlike other retailers, they already have secure storage for dangerous drugs.

Those who applaud the nanny state will protest, insisting that unformed young minds would want to try these things out and would be hooked. Certainly that would happen in some cases – but it happens now, so that is no argument.

Einstein defined lunacy as continuing to do the same thing and expecting a different outcome. In those terms we've been lunatics for a generation. Let's try sanity for once.

Repeal the 1971 Misuse of Drugs Act

I, like most people, want to minimise the harm caused by drugs to individuals, communities, society and the world.

I am not suggesting legalisation as commercial corporations have shown they are irresponsible making money at the expense of public health. Rather I suggest drugs be decriminalised to allow the people who choose to use it to be able to get it at a fair price with tax to cover the potential problems built into it. Drugs should not be marketed or advertised but adults should be free to make informed choices.

Is it paranoid to suggest that a vulnerable stigmatised group provides a convenient enemy for people in power?

It is up to us, the people to see through this process where the media misreport and antagonise and politicians feel they have to be seen to respond with ill thought out kneejerk responses. Those in any real power consider it political suicide to allow an evidence-based debate and therefore be seen as being soft on drugs. Our current PM was a member of the committee which said "We recommend that the Government initiates a discussion within the Commission on Narcotic Drugs of alternative ways—including the possibility of legalisation and regulation—to tackle the global drugs dilemma".

All I ask is to carry this through rather than focussing only on retaining power.

Why is this idea important?

I, like most people, want to minimise the harm caused by drugs to individuals, communities, society and the world.

I am not suggesting legalisation as commercial corporations have shown they are irresponsible making money at the expense of public health. Rather I suggest drugs be decriminalised to allow the people who choose to use it to be able to get it at a fair price with tax to cover the potential problems built into it. Drugs should not be marketed or advertised but adults should be free to make informed choices.

Is it paranoid to suggest that a vulnerable stigmatised group provides a convenient enemy for people in power?

It is up to us, the people to see through this process where the media misreport and antagonise and politicians feel they have to be seen to respond with ill thought out kneejerk responses. Those in any real power consider it political suicide to allow an evidence-based debate and therefore be seen as being soft on drugs. Our current PM was a member of the committee which said "We recommend that the Government initiates a discussion within the Commission on Narcotic Drugs of alternative ways—including the possibility of legalisation and regulation—to tackle the global drugs dilemma".

All I ask is to carry this through rather than focussing only on retaining power.

parent of drug user

 I agree that there should be drugs such as heroin legalised and distributed in a safe way. Methadone as a substitute causes more deaths than heroin and is a worse addiction. I have seen this first hand.When a drug addict needs help , its needed right away, putting on a waiting list when deperate is no answer. I honestly think that Rehabs should be built in every major city or town so that help is available soonest rather than later. I hope that this will happen as it will take lots of cr ime off the table and run out the dealers who make money out of peoples misery, threatening and killing daughters and sons    who are addicted and effects all families all over. Big time dealers should be charged with murder when discovered that they suplied and addict who has od`d with dirty heroin etc. The law is to  soft on dealers. I have read  sugestions     about age limits on drug users getting heroin instead of methadone. Addiction has no age limits. Treat when needed, not Make a 15 year old wait till 25 for treatment or clean heroin. Many are dead by that time.Treat it as an illness like alcoholism is and treat the person.some addicts have had terrible lives that made them take drugs to shut it out. help not criticism is needed

Why is this idea important?

 I agree that there should be drugs such as heroin legalised and distributed in a safe way. Methadone as a substitute causes more deaths than heroin and is a worse addiction. I have seen this first hand.When a drug addict needs help , its needed right away, putting on a waiting list when deperate is no answer. I honestly think that Rehabs should be built in every major city or town so that help is available soonest rather than later. I hope that this will happen as it will take lots of cr ime off the table and run out the dealers who make money out of peoples misery, threatening and killing daughters and sons    who are addicted and effects all families all over. Big time dealers should be charged with murder when discovered that they suplied and addict who has od`d with dirty heroin etc. The law is to  soft on dealers. I have read  sugestions     about age limits on drug users getting heroin instead of methadone. Addiction has no age limits. Treat when needed, not Make a 15 year old wait till 25 for treatment or clean heroin. Many are dead by that time.Treat it as an illness like alcoholism is and treat the person.some addicts have had terrible lives that made them take drugs to shut it out. help not criticism is needed

Drugs legislation.

My idea is decriminalising drug use.

It seems that making drugs illegal does not deter users or suppliers.  Millions of people around rhe world are suffering from the effects of the drugs trade. One cannot imagine the same level of violence occurring in the UK as is happening in Mexico but it may just be a matter of time.

Perhaps a radically different approach is necessary. If heroin, for example, was supplied from a government agency this would cut out the criminal element who have a vested interest in promoting drug dependency. The drugs would be supplied at cost, including overheads, so the scheme would not be a burden on the taxpayer. The users could be monitored for health problems and hopefully be disuaded from using drugs at all.

Why is this idea important?

My idea is decriminalising drug use.

It seems that making drugs illegal does not deter users or suppliers.  Millions of people around rhe world are suffering from the effects of the drugs trade. One cannot imagine the same level of violence occurring in the UK as is happening in Mexico but it may just be a matter of time.

Perhaps a radically different approach is necessary. If heroin, for example, was supplied from a government agency this would cut out the criminal element who have a vested interest in promoting drug dependency. The drugs would be supplied at cost, including overheads, so the scheme would not be a burden on the taxpayer. The users could be monitored for health problems and hopefully be disuaded from using drugs at all.

Decriminalise Heroin.

Decriminalisation of Heroin.Do not prosecute those caught with  an amount specified for personal consumption.Have opium grown and converted into heroin under licence in the west.Create a government monopoly on heroin production.which is administered to registered addicts through local drugs services.Continue to prosecute drug dealers and smugglers.

Why is this idea important?

Decriminalisation of Heroin.Do not prosecute those caught with  an amount specified for personal consumption.Have opium grown and converted into heroin under licence in the west.Create a government monopoly on heroin production.which is administered to registered addicts through local drugs services.Continue to prosecute drug dealers and smugglers.

Repeal Drugs Prohibition

The UK has long participated in the "Global War On Drugs". In spite of this, all research and anecdotal evidence suggests that the use of currently illegal drugs is increasing.

Arguements are made pertaining to the health and societal aspects of drug use being detrimental to the country. This is almost always overstated and often detracts from rational discussion on the subject.

What is proposed?

  • The prohibition of all drugs currently illegal to posses or use should end.
  • Those who wish to purchase previously illegal drugs should be able to obtain them from licenced and reputable vendors such as chemists.
  • Registration could be implemented in order to allow analysis of purchasing patterns to identify those who are potentially at risk from any proven health concerns.
  • VAT to be applied to these sales earning the government much needed revenue.
  • Quality control to be ensured by those licenced to manufacture and supply.

Why is this idea important?

The UK has long participated in the "Global War On Drugs". In spite of this, all research and anecdotal evidence suggests that the use of currently illegal drugs is increasing.

Arguements are made pertaining to the health and societal aspects of drug use being detrimental to the country. This is almost always overstated and often detracts from rational discussion on the subject.

What is proposed?

  • The prohibition of all drugs currently illegal to posses or use should end.
  • Those who wish to purchase previously illegal drugs should be able to obtain them from licenced and reputable vendors such as chemists.
  • Registration could be implemented in order to allow analysis of purchasing patterns to identify those who are potentially at risk from any proven health concerns.
  • VAT to be applied to these sales earning the government much needed revenue.
  • Quality control to be ensured by those licenced to manufacture and supply.