New English language requirement for partners

From 29 November 2010, you will need to show that you can speak and understand English if you want to enter or remain in the UK as the partner of a British citizen or a person settled here.

I wish to change the new requirement so a person does not need to pass any test before any  power so that they may live there life together.

Why is this idea important?

From 29 November 2010, you will need to show that you can speak and understand English if you want to enter or remain in the UK as the partner of a British citizen or a person settled here.

I wish to change the new requirement so a person does not need to pass any test before any  power so that they may live there life together.

Deddf 1536

Mae'n warthus fod y wefan yma ddim ar gael yn y Gymraeg. Mae cael defnyddio ein iaith ein hunain yn hawl sylfaenol dynol wedi'r cyfan ac nid oes gan y Llywodraeth yma unrhyw barch tuag at ein iaith yn ein gwlad ein hunain. Y ddeddf cyntaf sydd angen ei ddiddymu yw deddf uno Cymru a Lloegr 1536 er mwyn i ni yng Nghymru gael hunan lywodraeth lawn a rhyddid cenedlaethol

Why is this idea important?

Mae'n warthus fod y wefan yma ddim ar gael yn y Gymraeg. Mae cael defnyddio ein iaith ein hunain yn hawl sylfaenol dynol wedi'r cyfan ac nid oes gan y Llywodraeth yma unrhyw barch tuag at ein iaith yn ein gwlad ein hunain. Y ddeddf cyntaf sydd angen ei ddiddymu yw deddf uno Cymru a Lloegr 1536 er mwyn i ni yng Nghymru gael hunan lywodraeth lawn a rhyddid cenedlaethol

Freedom of choice for parents and children in Wales

In state schools in Wales it is compulsory for pupils to be taught Welsh(a minority language in Wales) as a subject. This means that parents and children are not able to exercise freedom of choice. Learning the Welsh language should be a matter of choice, not compulsion. so the law should be amended to give parents and children this freedom of choice.

Why is this idea important?

In state schools in Wales it is compulsory for pupils to be taught Welsh(a minority language in Wales) as a subject. This means that parents and children are not able to exercise freedom of choice. Learning the Welsh language should be a matter of choice, not compulsion. so the law should be amended to give parents and children this freedom of choice.

Welsh Publications

Stop printing Gov awareness leaflets in Welsh. 

 

I don't know/have never met any Welsh people who don't speak English.  Having to get the orginal transcripts translated from English into Welsh and then Welsh versions printed is unecessary.  It's a total waste of money, and should be stopped.

Why is this idea important?

Stop printing Gov awareness leaflets in Welsh. 

 

I don't know/have never met any Welsh people who don't speak English.  Having to get the orginal transcripts translated from English into Welsh and then Welsh versions printed is unecessary.  It's a total waste of money, and should be stopped.

Government must used British-English spelling and not American-English

The government must lead the way and stop using American spelling from their web sites. For example, on this web site, if you type colour or labour it indicates a spelling mistake. But if you type color or labor, then it indicates a correct spelling.

Why is this idea important?

The government must lead the way and stop using American spelling from their web sites. For example, on this web site, if you type colour or labour it indicates a spelling mistake. But if you type color or labor, then it indicates a correct spelling.

End discrimination against the English language in Wales

For many public sector appointments in Wales it is a requirement to be able to speak Welsh. However the majority of Welsh citizens do not speak Welsh so the pool from which public appointments are made is severely limited. A mandatory requirement like this should be outlawed so that local bodies can make sensible choices about the level of Welsh speakers that may be required and be able to select the best people from any linguistic background. 

Why is this idea important?

For many public sector appointments in Wales it is a requirement to be able to speak Welsh. However the majority of Welsh citizens do not speak Welsh so the pool from which public appointments are made is severely limited. A mandatory requirement like this should be outlawed so that local bodies can make sensible choices about the level of Welsh speakers that may be required and be able to select the best people from any linguistic background. 

Re-examination of the provisions of the Welsh Language Act

Every year, millions of pounds of taxpayers’ money are wasted in Wales as a direct consequence of the necessity to adhere strictly to the provisions of the Welsh Language Act. In my view, this Act needs to be urgently re-examined in great detail so as to ensure that this state of affairs is not allowed to continue. Let me provide three, fairly typical everyday examples of how public money is wasted unnecessarily within the Principality: (i) When Welsh local authorities wish to alter a road layout, they are obliged, as everywhere else, to announce their plans in the local press. In Wales, however, the cost of this announcement is effectively more than doubled because the advertising must be bilingual. Costs could easily be slashed by the simple expedient of adding one line to an English language advertisement stating that ‘a Welsh version of this announcement is available on request’. However, currently, this appears not to be acceptable under the terms of the Act. (ii) A voluntary organization recently wished to provide patient information leaflets on sickle cell disease in a range of Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Asian languages. Perhaps predictably, they ran out of money before the task was complete. One of the leaflets that was however successfully produced was in Welsh (because this was an obligatory requirement of receipt of public funding), despite the fact that it is vanishingly unlikely that any Welsh-speaking sickle cell disease patient actually exists in Wales. (iii) When scientific positions at my host institution, a leading Welsh University, are advertised in the local press, one is billed for the (more than doubled) cost of obligatory bilingual advertising. This is absolutely not what my hard-earned medical research funds were supposed to be used for! Further, I estimate that my cash-strapped host institution is obliged to fork out ~£250,000 per annum for this purpose. This is at a time when cut-backs are rife and some Welsh higher education institutions may have to merge or even close. Again, a perfectly reasonable compromise would be for the advertisement to state that a Welsh language version of the text was available on request. As the Welsh Language Act stands, however, this is unacceptable. These are just three examples of senseless waste in a virtual sea of wastefulness. Principality-wide, the sums of money involved are enormous and, to my mind, constitute a fertile hunting ground for massive savings that would be almost entirely painless to administer.    

Why is this idea important?

Every year, millions of pounds of taxpayers’ money are wasted in Wales as a direct consequence of the necessity to adhere strictly to the provisions of the Welsh Language Act. In my view, this Act needs to be urgently re-examined in great detail so as to ensure that this state of affairs is not allowed to continue. Let me provide three, fairly typical everyday examples of how public money is wasted unnecessarily within the Principality: (i) When Welsh local authorities wish to alter a road layout, they are obliged, as everywhere else, to announce their plans in the local press. In Wales, however, the cost of this announcement is effectively more than doubled because the advertising must be bilingual. Costs could easily be slashed by the simple expedient of adding one line to an English language advertisement stating that ‘a Welsh version of this announcement is available on request’. However, currently, this appears not to be acceptable under the terms of the Act. (ii) A voluntary organization recently wished to provide patient information leaflets on sickle cell disease in a range of Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Asian languages. Perhaps predictably, they ran out of money before the task was complete. One of the leaflets that was however successfully produced was in Welsh (because this was an obligatory requirement of receipt of public funding), despite the fact that it is vanishingly unlikely that any Welsh-speaking sickle cell disease patient actually exists in Wales. (iii) When scientific positions at my host institution, a leading Welsh University, are advertised in the local press, one is billed for the (more than doubled) cost of obligatory bilingual advertising. This is absolutely not what my hard-earned medical research funds were supposed to be used for! Further, I estimate that my cash-strapped host institution is obliged to fork out ~£250,000 per annum for this purpose. This is at a time when cut-backs are rife and some Welsh higher education institutions may have to merge or even close. Again, a perfectly reasonable compromise would be for the advertisement to state that a Welsh language version of the text was available on request. As the Welsh Language Act stands, however, this is unacceptable. These are just three examples of senseless waste in a virtual sea of wastefulness. Principality-wide, the sums of money involved are enormous and, to my mind, constitute a fertile hunting ground for massive savings that would be almost entirely painless to administer.