Scrap the Minimum Wage

I should not be banned from working just because I can't find anyone who will pay me £6/hour.

If I can find an employer willing to pay me £5 and I am willing to do the job then it is absolutely no business of the government's.

Why is this idea important?

I should not be banned from working just because I can't find anyone who will pay me £6/hour.

If I can find an employer willing to pay me £5 and I am willing to do the job then it is absolutely no business of the government's.

Waiting staff salary loop hole

When working as a waitress two years ago I was on a salary of £4.25 and hour, this was possible due to a supposed ‘loop hole’ in the law saying that because I was earning tips on the side it was legal for the company to pay me at such low salary. This should be removed and all waiting staff should be paid at the regular minimum wage.

Why is this idea important?

When working as a waitress two years ago I was on a salary of £4.25 and hour, this was possible due to a supposed ‘loop hole’ in the law saying that because I was earning tips on the side it was legal for the company to pay me at such low salary. This should be removed and all waiting staff should be paid at the regular minimum wage.

minimum wage must be increased dramatically.

The minimum wage??? how can people be expected to work for the minimum wage with inflation and taxes running out of control. I can understand if a couple, both on minimum wage work 40 hrs a week, may just be able to run a family without any help or benefits. However for a lot, One partner may have to bring the children up, or simply be too ill to work. What happens then? There is a lot of slating people who are on benefits, who really would prefer to be self sufficient, But whats happened to the lower end of pay in the past 20 -25 years. It has stayed exactly the same year after year in a round about way. Nobody comments on this situation. When I was 16 my dad was a crane driver at the local wharf. On a quite week he used to bring home £350 after deductions. I seriously can't imagine a crane driver bringing home more than £250- £300 a week after deductions nowaday's.

Large companies and greedy managers have totally stuffed the UK workforce. This in my opinion is why so many disheartened people find it hard to face working, when they would still simply struggle. Not to mention the shift in workplace employee rights and the "self employed" status which is now creeping in, to undermine any existing rights. The whole system is a rip off. And this is purely why our once Great Britain is wallowing in its own mire of unemployment and dependancy of benefits.

Small companies may struggle to afford to employ more staff on say £8 per hour, but if thats the case then the business is obviously not doing that well. If you cant afford something then  you dont buy it… We as a nation should'nt expect people to suffer and not have holidays or pension simply because some brake pedals that are manufactured would loose their competitive margin. The higher rates of pay would afford people to spend more, leading to increased sales on something else. So that argument does'nt wash with me.

Finally, surely it would be cheaper for the government to directly subsidise pay. Instead of vast amounts of citizens relying purely on benefits to live, would'nt it be better to have them work for £5.80 an hour payed for my the company that employs them, and £2.20 from the government. Rather than it all come from the government coffers. I know this is pretty much what happens anyway, However that person can say I earn £8 an hour and I don't receive any benefits. This would boost moral and surely end up being cheaper for the goverment.

Why is this idea important?

The minimum wage??? how can people be expected to work for the minimum wage with inflation and taxes running out of control. I can understand if a couple, both on minimum wage work 40 hrs a week, may just be able to run a family without any help or benefits. However for a lot, One partner may have to bring the children up, or simply be too ill to work. What happens then? There is a lot of slating people who are on benefits, who really would prefer to be self sufficient, But whats happened to the lower end of pay in the past 20 -25 years. It has stayed exactly the same year after year in a round about way. Nobody comments on this situation. When I was 16 my dad was a crane driver at the local wharf. On a quite week he used to bring home £350 after deductions. I seriously can't imagine a crane driver bringing home more than £250- £300 a week after deductions nowaday's.

Large companies and greedy managers have totally stuffed the UK workforce. This in my opinion is why so many disheartened people find it hard to face working, when they would still simply struggle. Not to mention the shift in workplace employee rights and the "self employed" status which is now creeping in, to undermine any existing rights. The whole system is a rip off. And this is purely why our once Great Britain is wallowing in its own mire of unemployment and dependancy of benefits.

Small companies may struggle to afford to employ more staff on say £8 per hour, but if thats the case then the business is obviously not doing that well. If you cant afford something then  you dont buy it… We as a nation should'nt expect people to suffer and not have holidays or pension simply because some brake pedals that are manufactured would loose their competitive margin. The higher rates of pay would afford people to spend more, leading to increased sales on something else. So that argument does'nt wash with me.

Finally, surely it would be cheaper for the government to directly subsidise pay. Instead of vast amounts of citizens relying purely on benefits to live, would'nt it be better to have them work for £5.80 an hour payed for my the company that employs them, and £2.20 from the government. Rather than it all come from the government coffers. I know this is pretty much what happens anyway, However that person can say I earn £8 an hour and I don't receive any benefits. This would boost moral and surely end up being cheaper for the goverment.

Stop the constant increases in the minimum wage

Since its introduction the minimum wage has increased at a disproportionately high rate compared with average wages. This needs to be frozen for a period to give time for businesses to adapt, otherwise there will be a reduction in employment.

Why is this idea important?

Since its introduction the minimum wage has increased at a disproportionately high rate compared with average wages. This needs to be frozen for a period to give time for businesses to adapt, otherwise there will be a reduction in employment.

Guarantee the Minimum Wage for interns

Young people are now expected to work unpaid at the start of their careers as the very few opportunities that exist are "for "interns". These are, in the main, just unpaid work.

We have a minimum wage in this country, a guaranteed sum which must be paid to every worker, however this is being abused by employers who think that, by calling their jobs "internships", they can avoid paying the legal minimum. The Minimum Wage regulations should be amended to cover "internships" (they are not mentioned at all) and for employers to be required to pay all young people what they should be paying them.

Why is this idea important?

Young people are now expected to work unpaid at the start of their careers as the very few opportunities that exist are "for "interns". These are, in the main, just unpaid work.

We have a minimum wage in this country, a guaranteed sum which must be paid to every worker, however this is being abused by employers who think that, by calling their jobs "internships", they can avoid paying the legal minimum. The Minimum Wage regulations should be amended to cover "internships" (they are not mentioned at all) and for employers to be required to pay all young people what they should be paying them.

Calculate benefits and tax credits per individual, not per couple

Calculate jobseekers allowance and working tax credits on adults' individual NI contributions and work history – not on what their partner earns.

Why is this idea important?

Calculate jobseekers allowance and working tax credits on adults' individual NI contributions and work history – not on what their partner earns.

Stop theTraining Wage Bill Deplorable attack ?

Training Wage Bill 2010-11
Most of this article will be speculation because the Bill is a Private Members Bill so we cannot get the contents of the Bill.

The National Minimum Wage doesn’t appear to be disappearing any time soon. The official term would be to be repealed, however, I am stating it will become “dissolved” as such Bill is aiming for legislation to bypass (not remove or replace) the National Minimum Wage what appears to be beyond any Government scheme.

A Bill to make provision that persons receiving a training wage are exempt from legislation relating to the minimum wage; and for connected purposes.

The above is a description for the Bill. We can only assume this means apprentices etc. and those deemed to be “training” (outside of Government unemployment/training/employment courses) to be able to receive below the National Minimum Wage.

Why is this idea important?

Training Wage Bill 2010-11
Most of this article will be speculation because the Bill is a Private Members Bill so we cannot get the contents of the Bill.

The National Minimum Wage doesn’t appear to be disappearing any time soon. The official term would be to be repealed, however, I am stating it will become “dissolved” as such Bill is aiming for legislation to bypass (not remove or replace) the National Minimum Wage what appears to be beyond any Government scheme.

A Bill to make provision that persons receiving a training wage are exempt from legislation relating to the minimum wage; and for connected purposes.

The above is a description for the Bill. We can only assume this means apprentices etc. and those deemed to be “training” (outside of Government unemployment/training/employment courses) to be able to receive below the National Minimum Wage.

Cap the minimum wage

Minimum wage goes up each year, yet semi skilled work does not go up in line.

Also small businesses cannot afford to keep on paying the rise. Currently £5.80 is a good wage to be on for unskilled work.

Why is this idea important?

Minimum wage goes up each year, yet semi skilled work does not go up in line.

Also small businesses cannot afford to keep on paying the rise. Currently £5.80 is a good wage to be on for unskilled work.

Reform the National Minimum Wage to allow profit-share enterprises

Simply that the burden of paying the National Minimum Wage should be lifted from enterprises where the Employee or Worker has a share in any profits or gross earnings of that enterprise.

Why is this idea important?

Simply that the burden of paying the National Minimum Wage should be lifted from enterprises where the Employee or Worker has a share in any profits or gross earnings of that enterprise.

Promote employment by abolishing minimum wage/unfair dismissal

Abolish the National Minimum Wage.

Abolish employment protection legislation relating to unfair dismissal.

Each was introduced for the best possible motives but, as so often, has unintended consequences. 

Here the unintended consequences of  legislation designed to help individual workers results in discouraging:-

(i) employment in absolute terms ["I cannot employ Tom, as I do not want to pay as much as the NMW"] and

(ii) the free movement of labour ["I cannot dismiss incompetent Richard and employ the excellent Harriet , as Richard may sue me for unfair dismissal"]

I write as the owner of a small business. 

The business happens to be the practice of law, including employment law.

I act for plenty of other owners of small businesses, many of whom suffer from unfair dismissal employment law claims and all of whom would take on more staff if they knew they could pay staff what they wanted and hire and fire staff as needs dictated.

 

Why is this idea important?

Abolish the National Minimum Wage.

Abolish employment protection legislation relating to unfair dismissal.

Each was introduced for the best possible motives but, as so often, has unintended consequences. 

Here the unintended consequences of  legislation designed to help individual workers results in discouraging:-

(i) employment in absolute terms ["I cannot employ Tom, as I do not want to pay as much as the NMW"] and

(ii) the free movement of labour ["I cannot dismiss incompetent Richard and employ the excellent Harriet , as Richard may sue me for unfair dismissal"]

I write as the owner of a small business. 

The business happens to be the practice of law, including employment law.

I act for plenty of other owners of small businesses, many of whom suffer from unfair dismissal employment law claims and all of whom would take on more staff if they knew they could pay staff what they wanted and hire and fire staff as needs dictated.

 

Long term unemployed to earn benefits through community work

The Welfare State, fantastic as it was as an ideal designed  to protect those in society who genuinely needed it, has (through it's own failure to predict the nature of our species), with time, created a subculture in our society who believe they have a right to be supported by the state (and therefore the taxpayer). This idea needs to be reversed. In the words of J.F  Kennedy ask "not what your country can do for you but what can you do for your country". There are many initiatives possible to educate or change the attitude of that part of society and I do believe we are at a watershed in our culture where we have the opportunity to do so before indeed it is too late. A fundamental measure to me is motivating and educating those who are currently unemployed but who are able to work, to contribute to society and the community as a first step to that realisation of their own worth and idea of self responsibility for the good of all.

Why is this idea important?

The Welfare State, fantastic as it was as an ideal designed  to protect those in society who genuinely needed it, has (through it's own failure to predict the nature of our species), with time, created a subculture in our society who believe they have a right to be supported by the state (and therefore the taxpayer). This idea needs to be reversed. In the words of J.F  Kennedy ask "not what your country can do for you but what can you do for your country". There are many initiatives possible to educate or change the attitude of that part of society and I do believe we are at a watershed in our culture where we have the opportunity to do so before indeed it is too late. A fundamental measure to me is motivating and educating those who are currently unemployed but who are able to work, to contribute to society and the community as a first step to that realisation of their own worth and idea of self responsibility for the good of all.

The only idea you need: make all laws apply to MPs

Dear Mr Clegg

I think it's great that you've set up this website. It shows that you are committed to real engagement in the democratic process, which is an excellent thing.

However, you must be wondering now how you are going to sort through all the ideas here. There are thousands of ideas, and although doubtless many of the dafter ones can be ruled out pretty quickly, many of the other suggestions are actually pretty good, so it must be very hard to know where to start.

Let me help you. I would like to suggest just one law that you could introduce to help businesses emerge from the shackles of red tape. This is not to say that the other ideas aren't good: many of them are excellent, but all the good ideas will emerge naturally over the course of this parliament if you implement my idea first.

My idea is simple: make sure that every single business regulation applies to MPs and ministers in their own offices and departments, only more so. MPs are probably exempt from a lot of laws at the moment, and even if they're not technically exempt, someone at a high level has clearly taken a decision not to enforce them. For example, I can't take on an unpaid intern in my business, as I would be breaking minimum wage legislation, yet if you look on the w4mp.org website, you'll see many MPs advertising for unpaid interns. That kind of double standard has to stop.

But it needs to go further than that. The laws that apply to the rest of us need to apply much more vigorously to MPs. You need to set up an independent enforcement body (perhaps headed by a senior police officer), with the job of proactively looking for any breaches of any business regulation whatsoever among MPs and ministers. For example, I am required to update my health and safety policy annually. I actually do that, because I'm a good boy, but if I didn't, I'd probably get away with it unless there were some accident at my company that got investigated. However, with my idea, inspectors would regularly inspect the health and safety policy in every MPs office. If it's 366 days since it was last updated, then the MP is prosecuted. No ifs, no buts. You could imagine something pretty similar for every other bit of business regulation.

And if MPs are prosecuted, penalties would have to be more serious. Any fines levied could be at 5 times the level that would be applied to a business caught for the same offence (and no claiming the fines on expenses!), and if they do anything serious enough to merit a custodial sentence, then you'd lock them up for longer than you would a member of the public. Needless to say, ministers would be personally liable for any breaches of the law in their own departments.

And it goes without saying that MPs would have to fill in a P11D for all their expenses, which would be gone over in minute detail by some of the meanest inspectors that HMRC has to offer (and trust me, they are not lacking in such people).

Once that regime is in place, I think you'd find that parliament would pretty quickly vote for most of the other good ideas suggested on this site, without your having to do anything specific to encourage it.

Why is this idea important?

Dear Mr Clegg

I think it's great that you've set up this website. It shows that you are committed to real engagement in the democratic process, which is an excellent thing.

However, you must be wondering now how you are going to sort through all the ideas here. There are thousands of ideas, and although doubtless many of the dafter ones can be ruled out pretty quickly, many of the other suggestions are actually pretty good, so it must be very hard to know where to start.

Let me help you. I would like to suggest just one law that you could introduce to help businesses emerge from the shackles of red tape. This is not to say that the other ideas aren't good: many of them are excellent, but all the good ideas will emerge naturally over the course of this parliament if you implement my idea first.

My idea is simple: make sure that every single business regulation applies to MPs and ministers in their own offices and departments, only more so. MPs are probably exempt from a lot of laws at the moment, and even if they're not technically exempt, someone at a high level has clearly taken a decision not to enforce them. For example, I can't take on an unpaid intern in my business, as I would be breaking minimum wage legislation, yet if you look on the w4mp.org website, you'll see many MPs advertising for unpaid interns. That kind of double standard has to stop.

But it needs to go further than that. The laws that apply to the rest of us need to apply much more vigorously to MPs. You need to set up an independent enforcement body (perhaps headed by a senior police officer), with the job of proactively looking for any breaches of any business regulation whatsoever among MPs and ministers. For example, I am required to update my health and safety policy annually. I actually do that, because I'm a good boy, but if I didn't, I'd probably get away with it unless there were some accident at my company that got investigated. However, with my idea, inspectors would regularly inspect the health and safety policy in every MPs office. If it's 366 days since it was last updated, then the MP is prosecuted. No ifs, no buts. You could imagine something pretty similar for every other bit of business regulation.

And if MPs are prosecuted, penalties would have to be more serious. Any fines levied could be at 5 times the level that would be applied to a business caught for the same offence (and no claiming the fines on expenses!), and if they do anything serious enough to merit a custodial sentence, then you'd lock them up for longer than you would a member of the public. Needless to say, ministers would be personally liable for any breaches of the law in their own departments.

And it goes without saying that MPs would have to fill in a P11D for all their expenses, which would be gone over in minute detail by some of the meanest inspectors that HMRC has to offer (and trust me, they are not lacking in such people).

Once that regime is in place, I think you'd find that parliament would pretty quickly vote for most of the other good ideas suggested on this site, without your having to do anything specific to encourage it.

Amend minimum wage legislation to allow internships

I must confess I'm not sure whether the minimum wage legislation as a basic principle is a good thing or a  bad thing. I can see the arguments against, that it distorts the market, and the arguments for, that it protects exploitation of those at the lower end of the income scale. I'll let those who understand more about economics than I do decide whether the minimum wage legislation as a whole should stay or go.

However, if we are going to keep this law, then we need to make an exception for internships. Currently, it is illegal for employers to offer unpaid internships. This is a great shame. Internships can be a great stepping-stone for recent graduates, who can find it very hard to find work if they have no experience. They often lead to permanent jobs in the same organisation, and even if they don't, then the experience that the interns can put on their CVs can be a great help in finding jobs elsewhere. And of course the employer benefits from having an extra pair of hands at no cost. It's a classic win-win situation.

Maybe in an ideal world all internships would be paid at the minimum wage, but in real life many employers simply can't afford to pay, and so internships that would otherwise be available just don't exist.

Oh, and by the way, how come MPs can still advertise for unpaid interns for their offices? Is this another law from which MPs have a special exemption?

Why is this idea important?

I must confess I'm not sure whether the minimum wage legislation as a basic principle is a good thing or a  bad thing. I can see the arguments against, that it distorts the market, and the arguments for, that it protects exploitation of those at the lower end of the income scale. I'll let those who understand more about economics than I do decide whether the minimum wage legislation as a whole should stay or go.

However, if we are going to keep this law, then we need to make an exception for internships. Currently, it is illegal for employers to offer unpaid internships. This is a great shame. Internships can be a great stepping-stone for recent graduates, who can find it very hard to find work if they have no experience. They often lead to permanent jobs in the same organisation, and even if they don't, then the experience that the interns can put on their CVs can be a great help in finding jobs elsewhere. And of course the employer benefits from having an extra pair of hands at no cost. It's a classic win-win situation.

Maybe in an ideal world all internships would be paid at the minimum wage, but in real life many employers simply can't afford to pay, and so internships that would otherwise be available just don't exist.

Oh, and by the way, how come MPs can still advertise for unpaid interns for their offices? Is this another law from which MPs have a special exemption?

Abolish the Minimum Wage

There are lots of people that would like to have a part-time, even if low paid, job to give them something interesting and useful to do and some pin money. Bring back the car park attendants and public toilet supervisors! Someone to sweep the platform at a country rail station – the unions have stolen these people's lives and made car parks, stations and public loos a nightmare, sometimes even leading to closure.

Why is this idea important?

There are lots of people that would like to have a part-time, even if low paid, job to give them something interesting and useful to do and some pin money. Bring back the car park attendants and public toilet supervisors! Someone to sweep the platform at a country rail station – the unions have stolen these people's lives and made car parks, stations and public loos a nightmare, sometimes even leading to closure.

Allow apprentices over 22 to opt out of the higher rate of the minimum wage

Allow mature apprentices to opt out of the higher rate of the minimum wage. please read all below before leaving a comment.

Why is this idea important?

Allow mature apprentices to opt out of the higher rate of the minimum wage. please read all below before leaving a comment.

Apprenticeships should be available for all, not just the young

I propose that the law is changed when it comes to apprenticeships and pay.

Currently, if you'd like (or need) to change vocations in the UK, it is almost impossible to do so if you are aged over 19.

The reason for this obstacle is that the law currently states employers must begin paying the full adult rate minimum wage after 12 months if the apprentice is aged over 19 (despite the fact they are nowhere near qualifying in their new trade), whilst 16-19 year olds are able to work on the apprentice minimum wage rate for the entire 2-3 years it takes to complete the NVQ and become qualified.

I propose that the "12 month limit" for those apprentices choosing to retrain over the age of 19 is removed entirely, so that regardless of age, employers are able to take on any apprentice for the full 2-3 years it takes to complete their studies; not just the young.

Why is this idea important?

I propose that the law is changed when it comes to apprenticeships and pay.

Currently, if you'd like (or need) to change vocations in the UK, it is almost impossible to do so if you are aged over 19.

The reason for this obstacle is that the law currently states employers must begin paying the full adult rate minimum wage after 12 months if the apprentice is aged over 19 (despite the fact they are nowhere near qualifying in their new trade), whilst 16-19 year olds are able to work on the apprentice minimum wage rate for the entire 2-3 years it takes to complete the NVQ and become qualified.

I propose that the "12 month limit" for those apprentices choosing to retrain over the age of 19 is removed entirely, so that regardless of age, employers are able to take on any apprentice for the full 2-3 years it takes to complete their studies; not just the young.

Replace National minimum wage with a Regional minimum wage

There have been suggestions on this site to scrap national minimum wage altogether.

I can't agree with that. I think it would be a backwards step, hence me starting a new thread.

My idea is that we should alter the National Minimum Wage law and introduce a Regional Minimum Wage linked to the cost of living.

It's blindingly obvious that the current minimum wage stretches a lot further in the North than it does in the South. This needs to be adressed.

My belief is that the banks and call centers do actually want UK staff talking to UK people, and the UK car companies also would prefer to have UK people too, but everyone in the UK costs the same price…and that price is too expensive when compared to other regions in Europe and the rest of the world.

A call center staff member living in London might indeed need £6 an hour to simply survive, but £6 an hour in Newcastle or Liverpool buys a whole lot more where the rents, council tax, travel costs and house prices are so much lower.

Why is this idea important?

There have been suggestions on this site to scrap national minimum wage altogether.

I can't agree with that. I think it would be a backwards step, hence me starting a new thread.

My idea is that we should alter the National Minimum Wage law and introduce a Regional Minimum Wage linked to the cost of living.

It's blindingly obvious that the current minimum wage stretches a lot further in the North than it does in the South. This needs to be adressed.

My belief is that the banks and call centers do actually want UK staff talking to UK people, and the UK car companies also would prefer to have UK people too, but everyone in the UK costs the same price…and that price is too expensive when compared to other regions in Europe and the rest of the world.

A call center staff member living in London might indeed need £6 an hour to simply survive, but £6 an hour in Newcastle or Liverpool buys a whole lot more where the rents, council tax, travel costs and house prices are so much lower.

Minimum Wage Increase

Everything is going up in price nearly twice in a year, housing is out of control, cars constantly go up, food, fuel, bills, everything just keeps going up and up, yet you still expect people to carry on with the same wages they were earning over 10 years ago……..ridiculous, minimum pay should be at least £10 per hour for everyone over the age of 21.

Why is this idea important?

Everything is going up in price nearly twice in a year, housing is out of control, cars constantly go up, food, fuel, bills, everything just keeps going up and up, yet you still expect people to carry on with the same wages they were earning over 10 years ago……..ridiculous, minimum pay should be at least £10 per hour for everyone over the age of 21.

Minimum wage

Either stop increasing it or abolish it or set a basic amount. At the moment it is far too high why would i want to pay so much for a 17 year old to do the washing up/dishes and clear tables or a waitress. Absolutely ridiculous.

Due to the minimum wage it is easier for employes to employ 1x full time member of staff over the age of 21 , reduce the other staffs  hours and let them all do the washing up.

When people accept jobs they accept it because they wish to , no one is forced therefore the minimum wage has cost a lot of jobs for employers as we simply cant afford to employ at those rates. Additionally, a lot of people have left their stressful day jobs to work at check out counters in the evenings as thanks to the minimum wage , you can earn the same amount of money woking in Tesco, as opposed to working during the day in a bank and have a less of a stressful life.

Why is this idea important?

Either stop increasing it or abolish it or set a basic amount. At the moment it is far too high why would i want to pay so much for a 17 year old to do the washing up/dishes and clear tables or a waitress. Absolutely ridiculous.

Due to the minimum wage it is easier for employes to employ 1x full time member of staff over the age of 21 , reduce the other staffs  hours and let them all do the washing up.

When people accept jobs they accept it because they wish to , no one is forced therefore the minimum wage has cost a lot of jobs for employers as we simply cant afford to employ at those rates. Additionally, a lot of people have left their stressful day jobs to work at check out counters in the evenings as thanks to the minimum wage , you can earn the same amount of money woking in Tesco, as opposed to working during the day in a bank and have a less of a stressful life.

The minimum wage should be proportional to business size

I believe that the minimum wage should rise proportionally.

The problem with the minimum wage is that small business can't afford to pay the minimum wage, but some workers are happy to work for under this. On the flip side, there are big companies rolling around in profit who pay the minimum wage. Supermarkets are a great example of this.

Why is this idea important?

I believe that the minimum wage should rise proportionally.

The problem with the minimum wage is that small business can't afford to pay the minimum wage, but some workers are happy to work for under this. On the flip side, there are big companies rolling around in profit who pay the minimum wage. Supermarkets are a great example of this.

Review the Minimum Wage

Thanks to the poor rate of accommodation offset, and the lack of a food offset altogether, most employers no longer allow for live-in staff.  Before the Minimum Wage was introduced the very lowest earners used to get casual jobs with accommodation and food, and (consequently) a VERY low hourly rate, but they became worse off when they had to find their own accommodation at the market rate, and had to buy their own food.  To put it another way, although the lowest earners now earn more hard cash, they had more disposable income before when the value of the whole package was higher.  In effect for some of the lowest earners the way the Minimum Wage operates has lowered living conditions for those worst off, and the raise in the hourly rate has cut job creation (as employers cannot afford to just take someone on any more).

The only group to benefit in every case was the revenue, as the raise in the wage pushed the lowest earners into the income tax and National Insurance brackets.

I don't think we should get rid of the Minimum Wage, as it does offer protection to many many earners, but we need to make sure that it really is helping the lowest earners, is helping job creation, and is not just a back door way of increasing tax receipts.

Why is this idea important?

Thanks to the poor rate of accommodation offset, and the lack of a food offset altogether, most employers no longer allow for live-in staff.  Before the Minimum Wage was introduced the very lowest earners used to get casual jobs with accommodation and food, and (consequently) a VERY low hourly rate, but they became worse off when they had to find their own accommodation at the market rate, and had to buy their own food.  To put it another way, although the lowest earners now earn more hard cash, they had more disposable income before when the value of the whole package was higher.  In effect for some of the lowest earners the way the Minimum Wage operates has lowered living conditions for those worst off, and the raise in the hourly rate has cut job creation (as employers cannot afford to just take someone on any more).

The only group to benefit in every case was the revenue, as the raise in the wage pushed the lowest earners into the income tax and National Insurance brackets.

I don't think we should get rid of the Minimum Wage, as it does offer protection to many many earners, but we need to make sure that it really is helping the lowest earners, is helping job creation, and is not just a back door way of increasing tax receipts.