Freedom to choose male doctor

Currently, where there are group practices, a woman patient can choose to see a woman doctor where the problem is female-only (and sometimes even when it isn't).

But there are also problems that are male-only. Sometimes a male patient would feel more comfortable discussing his issue with a man because a woman — purely because of her female sex and for no other reason — would be out of touch.

This choice should be available to men.

Why is this idea important?

Currently, where there are group practices, a woman patient can choose to see a woman doctor where the problem is female-only (and sometimes even when it isn't).

But there are also problems that are male-only. Sometimes a male patient would feel more comfortable discussing his issue with a man because a woman — purely because of her female sex and for no other reason — would be out of touch.

This choice should be available to men.

Patients should have control over their data – there should not be any surprises

Patients should have the right to choose whether or not their personal and/or clinical data is processed (including but not restricted to, uploading to databases, shared, accessed and so on).  Explicit informed consent should be required BEFORE any personal or clinical data can be added to databases or other means of storing or sharing data.  Automatic opt-in should not be allowed to avoid patients being surprised to find out that their data is being processed for any purpose other than the specific purpose they were provided for.

IT should not drive patients' rights – patients need to be in control of their data.  Going to your GP should not be a worry as to whether your data is going to end up on some database that you are not aware of, or that some researcher is going to be able to trawl through your records without your consent.  This is not acceptable.

This applies to all data processing possibilities concerning patient data (personal and clinical).  To help to avoid surprises and to ensure that patients are kept fully informed of any processing of their data (and to ensure that only processing that has been consented to is taking place), patients should be provided with a regular list of all potential forms of data processing possible regarding their data together with a list of any processing that they have currently consented to.

Why is this idea important?

Patients should have the right to choose whether or not their personal and/or clinical data is processed (including but not restricted to, uploading to databases, shared, accessed and so on).  Explicit informed consent should be required BEFORE any personal or clinical data can be added to databases or other means of storing or sharing data.  Automatic opt-in should not be allowed to avoid patients being surprised to find out that their data is being processed for any purpose other than the specific purpose they were provided for.

IT should not drive patients' rights – patients need to be in control of their data.  Going to your GP should not be a worry as to whether your data is going to end up on some database that you are not aware of, or that some researcher is going to be able to trawl through your records without your consent.  This is not acceptable.

This applies to all data processing possibilities concerning patient data (personal and clinical).  To help to avoid surprises and to ensure that patients are kept fully informed of any processing of their data (and to ensure that only processing that has been consented to is taking place), patients should be provided with a regular list of all potential forms of data processing possible regarding their data together with a list of any processing that they have currently consented to.

Patients data and databases – there should be no surprises

Patients should be autonomous – have the freedom to control – the processing of their personal and clinical data/records.  They should also be kept fully informed as to the processing of their personal and medical data on a regular basis.

So BEFORE any personal or clinical data can be added to a database/register or other data storage system the patient should be asked to give informed consent.  If the patient refuses consent then the data should not be processed (that includes sharing, uploading, accessing and so on).  

There should not be any surprises for the patient regarding processing of their personal and clinical data.

Why is this idea important?

Patients should be autonomous – have the freedom to control – the processing of their personal and clinical data/records.  They should also be kept fully informed as to the processing of their personal and medical data on a regular basis.

So BEFORE any personal or clinical data can be added to a database/register or other data storage system the patient should be asked to give informed consent.  If the patient refuses consent then the data should not be processed (that includes sharing, uploading, accessing and so on).  

There should not be any surprises for the patient regarding processing of their personal and clinical data.