Enterprise Zones for Self Employed

 






Councils are lacking in both money and ideas that encourage enterprise. They are not entrepreneurial by nature and do not understand the needs of small business and the self-employed.

 

In the UK we have plenty of talented and creative individuals capable of growing businesses and plenty of empty commercial premises. I would like to suggest that a nationwide enterprise task force is set up that is most importantly staffed by people from a business background who understand the needs of the self-employed.

 

If the task force had special powers to create enterprise zones within local communties those participating could be protected from interference from red tape and conditions could be created that allowed eneterprise to thrive.

 

The scheme would be about local regeneration, rebuilding pride in the community but at the same time be a strong national movement supporting and demonstrating what the strengths of the UK are and aiming to build businesses that have potential to grow.

 

The enterprise zones would be controlled areas guided by rules set up to allow business to thrive, those participating in the scheme could team up exchange and share skills. The areas could be free of normal legislation and special insurance schemes could devised so that all invoved would be protected. There could be shared exhibition facitilies, retail outlets and other shared facilites. Business angels could be invited to paticipate,  importing agents could be encourage to visit and advise.

Big business could be encouraged to support the scheme financially as there would be prestige associated with potential success and benefits to them in many other ways.

The whole scheme could be celebrated and publicised by the media and become inspirational to those who are unable to find employment.

 

 

Why is this idea important?

 






Councils are lacking in both money and ideas that encourage enterprise. They are not entrepreneurial by nature and do not understand the needs of small business and the self-employed.

 

In the UK we have plenty of talented and creative individuals capable of growing businesses and plenty of empty commercial premises. I would like to suggest that a nationwide enterprise task force is set up that is most importantly staffed by people from a business background who understand the needs of the self-employed.

 

If the task force had special powers to create enterprise zones within local communties those participating could be protected from interference from red tape and conditions could be created that allowed eneterprise to thrive.

 

The scheme would be about local regeneration, rebuilding pride in the community but at the same time be a strong national movement supporting and demonstrating what the strengths of the UK are and aiming to build businesses that have potential to grow.

 

The enterprise zones would be controlled areas guided by rules set up to allow business to thrive, those participating in the scheme could team up exchange and share skills. The areas could be free of normal legislation and special insurance schemes could devised so that all invoved would be protected. There could be shared exhibition facitilies, retail outlets and other shared facilites. Business angels could be invited to paticipate,  importing agents could be encourage to visit and advise.

Big business could be encouraged to support the scheme financially as there would be prestige associated with potential success and benefits to them in many other ways.

The whole scheme could be celebrated and publicised by the media and become inspirational to those who are unable to find employment.

 

 

Repeal retrospective elements of section 58, 2008 Finance Act

Section 58 of the 2008 Finance Act attempted to close a perceived tax avoidance loophole, legitimately used and annually declared to HMRC by thousands of self-employed contractors over the last decade.  However, in a move that is unprecedented in UK Tax history, section 58 then back-dated this legislation under the guise of a 'clarification' to 2002.  The legislation is currently being challenged under the European Human Rights act with a hearing due at the Court of Appeal in November.  I propose that this insidious and pernicious legislation, introduced by the previous Labour government, be repealed immediately for the reasons given below.

Why is this idea important?

Section 58 of the 2008 Finance Act attempted to close a perceived tax avoidance loophole, legitimately used and annually declared to HMRC by thousands of self-employed contractors over the last decade.  However, in a move that is unprecedented in UK Tax history, section 58 then back-dated this legislation under the guise of a 'clarification' to 2002.  The legislation is currently being challenged under the European Human Rights act with a hearing due at the Court of Appeal in November.  I propose that this insidious and pernicious legislation, introduced by the previous Labour government, be repealed immediately for the reasons given below.

Website directories/networks for the Self-Employed

Currently a website directory/network for professional/qualified/skilled self-employed people to advertise their services, to publish references and examples of past services, to join informal overlapping teams for specific tasks, to build and maintain relationships with past current and future customers, is classified as an Employment Agency by the Employment Agency and Employment Business Regulations when it is in fact a directory network publisher. 

The current classification imposes a vast bureaucratic cost on each user and each task.  The result is this revolutionary business model doesn't exist in the UK.

Why is this idea important?

Currently a website directory/network for professional/qualified/skilled self-employed people to advertise their services, to publish references and examples of past services, to join informal overlapping teams for specific tasks, to build and maintain relationships with past current and future customers, is classified as an Employment Agency by the Employment Agency and Employment Business Regulations when it is in fact a directory network publisher. 

The current classification imposes a vast bureaucratic cost on each user and each task.  The result is this revolutionary business model doesn't exist in the UK.

Limit Self Assessment and Record Keeping for Hobbyist and Micro Businesses




Micro Businesses eg crafters and hobbyists for example should not need to keep records of sales and expenses or register for self assessment,unless they are also claiming benefits (whether disability,incapacity,housing benefit,tax credits,pension credits,job seekers allowance etc) or unless they are also working for an employer. If it is their only source of  earnings, they should not need to disclose until their turnover reaches £10,000 per annum.All they should need to do is tell the |Inland revenue  of their start up and sign an online disclosure form each year that there turnover has not reached , or is not expected to reach £10,000 in that tax year.Once this turnover figure is reached in any given tax year they should then begin keeping records ,but discounting the first £10,000 of turnover and related expenses up to the date the limit is reached. Although once the £10,000 turnover is reached capital allowances/gains would still be claimed/disclosed for the whole of the tax year in question. As an over 50 small online crafter/embroiderer,whereby this is my only earnings position,and who's ethic is self reliance , who does not ever rely on the benefit system,and who has set up solely to try to bring in a small supplementary income,( although my actual working day from home is virtually 24/7, so much less than minimum wage) my record keeping is both extensive and much too time consuming .In my opinion all this added paperwork and red tape is uneccessary as my profits are  very low and I would expect to always be well under the Lel for both income tax and national insurance.

Why is this idea important?




Micro Businesses eg crafters and hobbyists for example should not need to keep records of sales and expenses or register for self assessment,unless they are also claiming benefits (whether disability,incapacity,housing benefit,tax credits,pension credits,job seekers allowance etc) or unless they are also working for an employer. If it is their only source of  earnings, they should not need to disclose until their turnover reaches £10,000 per annum.All they should need to do is tell the |Inland revenue  of their start up and sign an online disclosure form each year that there turnover has not reached , or is not expected to reach £10,000 in that tax year.Once this turnover figure is reached in any given tax year they should then begin keeping records ,but discounting the first £10,000 of turnover and related expenses up to the date the limit is reached. Although once the £10,000 turnover is reached capital allowances/gains would still be claimed/disclosed for the whole of the tax year in question. As an over 50 small online crafter/embroiderer,whereby this is my only earnings position,and who's ethic is self reliance , who does not ever rely on the benefit system,and who has set up solely to try to bring in a small supplementary income,( although my actual working day from home is virtually 24/7, so much less than minimum wage) my record keeping is both extensive and much too time consuming .In my opinion all this added paperwork and red tape is uneccessary as my profits are  very low and I would expect to always be well under the Lel for both income tax and national insurance.

Make the Tax System Simpler!

I don't understand why the tax system has to be so complicated, you have income tax, council tax, national insurance contributions as well as tons more "direct" & "indirect" taxes. Whilst HMRC has done a great job with their new self assesment online system it still is far to complicated, especially for those of us with small businesses.

Why is this idea important?

I don't understand why the tax system has to be so complicated, you have income tax, council tax, national insurance contributions as well as tons more "direct" & "indirect" taxes. Whilst HMRC has done a great job with their new self assesment online system it still is far to complicated, especially for those of us with small businesses.