Repeal Schedule 7 airport interrogations

Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000 gives officers the ability to stop, detain and question passengers leaving and entering ports and airports in the UK without any suspicion of their involvement in terrorism.

It has led to deep unease amongst large numbers of people who have been subject to interview questions regarding their beliefs, acquaintances and everyday activities while travelling on holiday or business. Members of the public who do not cooperate can be subject to three months imprisonment, a £2,500 fine, or both.

Why is this idea important?

Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000 gives officers the ability to stop, detain and question passengers leaving and entering ports and airports in the UK without any suspicion of their involvement in terrorism.

It has led to deep unease amongst large numbers of people who have been subject to interview questions regarding their beliefs, acquaintances and everyday activities while travelling on holiday or business. Members of the public who do not cooperate can be subject to three months imprisonment, a £2,500 fine, or both.

Freedom to take photographs in public places.

Restore the right of ordinary people to take photographs in public places without fear of being criminalised.  It is a gross over exaggeration to regard anyone who takes a photograph of a policeman or a public building as a potential terrorist, or family and friends who want to take photographs of their children at school events as potential paedophiles.  Amateur photography  used to be regarded as a legitimate and acceptable pastime, not as an underhand activity to be regarded with suspicion.  I would like to see it restored to its former status.

Why is this idea important?

Restore the right of ordinary people to take photographs in public places without fear of being criminalised.  It is a gross over exaggeration to regard anyone who takes a photograph of a policeman or a public building as a potential terrorist, or family and friends who want to take photographs of their children at school events as potential paedophiles.  Amateur photography  used to be regarded as a legitimate and acceptable pastime, not as an underhand activity to be regarded with suspicion.  I would like to see it restored to its former status.

Stop police hassling people entering/leaving the UK

At least four people were hassled by the police when leaving the UK to attend planning meetings for Copenhagen. The only one named is Chris Kitchen and he has said what he thinks about it. The police and the rest have no business asking anyone why they are leaving the UK, until Labour took over this was a free country.

This proves that the police are out of control, using something supposedly to be about violent criminals to undertake political policing of peaceful protestors, attempting to intimidate them out of being politically active.

Since discovering this little known corner of the law, I have discovered that the police are also abusing people on internal flights at airports with the same intrusive and pointless questionning. No violent criminal is going to say, "I was going to blow up the centre of Glasgow, but you have got me banged to rights after asking these questions." This is simply an exercise in gathering data to put in to the databases, databases they denied existed, of people active in politics.

They have demonstrated the same enthusiasm to hassle peacful protestors for political reasons many times, at the G20, Kingsnorth, Heathrow and in Nottingham, to name but a few cases. However, my modest proposal is just to get rid of schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000 and the ammendments which also applied it to internal journeys within the British Isles.
 

Why is this idea important?

At least four people were hassled by the police when leaving the UK to attend planning meetings for Copenhagen. The only one named is Chris Kitchen and he has said what he thinks about it. The police and the rest have no business asking anyone why they are leaving the UK, until Labour took over this was a free country.

This proves that the police are out of control, using something supposedly to be about violent criminals to undertake political policing of peaceful protestors, attempting to intimidate them out of being politically active.

Since discovering this little known corner of the law, I have discovered that the police are also abusing people on internal flights at airports with the same intrusive and pointless questionning. No violent criminal is going to say, "I was going to blow up the centre of Glasgow, but you have got me banged to rights after asking these questions." This is simply an exercise in gathering data to put in to the databases, databases they denied existed, of people active in politics.

They have demonstrated the same enthusiasm to hassle peacful protestors for political reasons many times, at the G20, Kingsnorth, Heathrow and in Nottingham, to name but a few cases. However, my modest proposal is just to get rid of schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000 and the ammendments which also applied it to internal journeys within the British Isles.
 

Terrorism Act 2000

I qoute from the act.

 

Terrorism Act 2000 Part 6

54 Weapons training

(1) A person commits an offence if he provides instruction or training in the making or use of—

(a) firearms,

(b) explosives, or

(c) chemical, biological or nuclear weapons.

(2) A person commits an offence if he receives instruction or training in the making or use of—

(a) firearms,

(b) explosives, or

(c) chemical, biological or nuclear weapons.

Why is this idea important?

I qoute from the act.

 

Terrorism Act 2000 Part 6

54 Weapons training

(1) A person commits an offence if he provides instruction or training in the making or use of—

(a) firearms,

(b) explosives, or

(c) chemical, biological or nuclear weapons.

(2) A person commits an offence if he receives instruction or training in the making or use of—

(a) firearms,

(b) explosives, or

(c) chemical, biological or nuclear weapons.

Repeal or Amend the Terrorism Act 2000 – especially section 44

Repeal or amend the Terrorism Act 2000, especially section 44.

Section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000 enables police to stop and search anyone in a designated area without reasonable suspicion.

Why is this idea important?

Repeal or amend the Terrorism Act 2000, especially section 44.

Section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000 enables police to stop and search anyone in a designated area without reasonable suspicion.

Detention without charge

Nick congrats on the coalition, keep up the good work, don't let those reactionaries on the Labour benches destabilise this great coalition, two parties working for the common good!

I thinks that no one should be detained for more than 24 hours without being charged with some offence.

It is an affront to human decency and an insult to civilised society for the police to have the right to arrest and detain without charge, an individual for 28 days, those fanatics in Labour wanted to make it 42 days! 

Why is this idea important?

Nick congrats on the coalition, keep up the good work, don't let those reactionaries on the Labour benches destabilise this great coalition, two parties working for the common good!

I thinks that no one should be detained for more than 24 hours without being charged with some offence.

It is an affront to human decency and an insult to civilised society for the police to have the right to arrest and detain without charge, an individual for 28 days, those fanatics in Labour wanted to make it 42 days! 

Freedom of Speech.

This is a fundamental right, and one that has been stripped from us with anit-terror legislation (and some other laws too).

'Inciting racial hatred' and 'inciting religious hatred' should not be crimes. The Terrorism Act 2000 should be repealed in it's entirety for such insanity as 'Illegal literature', every law that limits freedom of speech in any way, including other laws such as the digital economy act limiting freeodm of speech online, should be repealed.

Why is this idea important?

This is a fundamental right, and one that has been stripped from us with anit-terror legislation (and some other laws too).

'Inciting racial hatred' and 'inciting religious hatred' should not be crimes. The Terrorism Act 2000 should be repealed in it's entirety for such insanity as 'Illegal literature', every law that limits freedom of speech in any way, including other laws such as the digital economy act limiting freeodm of speech online, should be repealed.

Stopping the use of designated zones for police stop and search and other sections of the terrorism act

This part of the Terrorism Act section 44 states that zones can be designated security zones and anyone at all regardless of whether the police have a legitimate reason to suspect them or not can be stopped and searched.

This has been ruled illegal by the European Court of Human Rights but as I know not everyone is a fan of Brussels I would like to advance my own reasons why unlimited stop and search powers within a particular area should be repealed.

First there are numerous occasions where this law has been abused – for instance to stop photographers.  The argument that this is a misapplication of the law and thus the law is okay should not hold water because simply put most police officers cannot be expected to learn the nuances of every law they are expected to uphold and thus the inevitable outcome is that this law has been abused on a widespread basis.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/personal-view/3620110/The-police-must-end-their-abuse-of-anti-terror-legislation.html

And who can forget the infamous abuse where an old age pensioner was ejected from a Labour party conference for speaking up.  The Terrorism act was quoted (in error) as justification for detaining the old man but that does not stop the fact that the police there thought they had the right to detain him under the act.  This must have been a a separate section of the act that was quoted but the principle is still the same.

It is simply wrong and not something any civilisation which truly respects its population should have as a law.

Why is this idea important?

This part of the Terrorism Act section 44 states that zones can be designated security zones and anyone at all regardless of whether the police have a legitimate reason to suspect them or not can be stopped and searched.

This has been ruled illegal by the European Court of Human Rights but as I know not everyone is a fan of Brussels I would like to advance my own reasons why unlimited stop and search powers within a particular area should be repealed.

First there are numerous occasions where this law has been abused – for instance to stop photographers.  The argument that this is a misapplication of the law and thus the law is okay should not hold water because simply put most police officers cannot be expected to learn the nuances of every law they are expected to uphold and thus the inevitable outcome is that this law has been abused on a widespread basis.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/personal-view/3620110/The-police-must-end-their-abuse-of-anti-terror-legislation.html

And who can forget the infamous abuse where an old age pensioner was ejected from a Labour party conference for speaking up.  The Terrorism act was quoted (in error) as justification for detaining the old man but that does not stop the fact that the police there thought they had the right to detain him under the act.  This must have been a a separate section of the act that was quoted but the principle is still the same.

It is simply wrong and not something any civilisation which truly respects its population should have as a law.

The Terrorism Act 2000 and The Terrorism Act 2006 amendments, Section 41 (detention without charge), Section 44 powers (stop and search), Section 58 Collection of information.

 

To abolish these Police State elements.

Section 41 (detention without charge)

Section 41 of the Act provided the police with the power to arrest and detain a person without charge for up to 48 hours if they were suspected of being a terrorist.[9] This period of detention could be extended to up to seven days if the police can persuade a judge that it is necessary for further questioning.

This was a break from ordinary criminal law where suspects had to be charged within 24 hours of detention or be released. This period was later extended to 14 days by the Criminal Justice Act 2003, and to 28 days by the Terrorism Act 2006.

Section 44 powers (stop and search)

The most commonly encountered use of the Act was outlined in Section 44 which enables the police and the Home Secretary to define any area in the country as well as a time period wherein they could stop and search any vehicle or person, and seize "articles of a kind which could be used in connection with terrorism". Unlike other stop and search powers that the police can use, Section 44 does not require the police to have "reasonable suspicion" that an offence has been committed, to search an individual.

In January 2010 the stop-and-search powers granted under Section 44 were ruled illegal by the European Court of Human Rights. It held that Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights had been violated in the case of two people stopped in 2003 outside the ExCeL convention centre in London, which at the time was hosting a military equipment exhibition. The Court found the powers were "not sufficiently circumscribed" and lacked "adequate legal safeguards against abuse," over-ruling a 2003 High Court judgement upheld at the Court of Appeal and the House of Lords.

Section 58 – Collection of information

This section creates the offence, liable to a prison term of up to ten years, to collect or possesses "information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism".

Sections 57-58: Possession offences: Section 57 is dealing with possessing articles for the purpose of terrorist acts. Section 58 is dealing with collecting or holding information that is of a kind likely to be useful to those involved in acts of terrorism. Section 57 includes a specific intention, section 58 does not.

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2000/ukpga_20000011_en_1

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2006/ukpga_20060011_en_1

Why is this idea important?

 

To abolish these Police State elements.

Section 41 (detention without charge)

Section 41 of the Act provided the police with the power to arrest and detain a person without charge for up to 48 hours if they were suspected of being a terrorist.[9] This period of detention could be extended to up to seven days if the police can persuade a judge that it is necessary for further questioning.

This was a break from ordinary criminal law where suspects had to be charged within 24 hours of detention or be released. This period was later extended to 14 days by the Criminal Justice Act 2003, and to 28 days by the Terrorism Act 2006.

Section 44 powers (stop and search)

The most commonly encountered use of the Act was outlined in Section 44 which enables the police and the Home Secretary to define any area in the country as well as a time period wherein they could stop and search any vehicle or person, and seize "articles of a kind which could be used in connection with terrorism". Unlike other stop and search powers that the police can use, Section 44 does not require the police to have "reasonable suspicion" that an offence has been committed, to search an individual.

In January 2010 the stop-and-search powers granted under Section 44 were ruled illegal by the European Court of Human Rights. It held that Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights had been violated in the case of two people stopped in 2003 outside the ExCeL convention centre in London, which at the time was hosting a military equipment exhibition. The Court found the powers were "not sufficiently circumscribed" and lacked "adequate legal safeguards against abuse," over-ruling a 2003 High Court judgement upheld at the Court of Appeal and the House of Lords.

Section 58 – Collection of information

This section creates the offence, liable to a prison term of up to ten years, to collect or possesses "information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism".

Sections 57-58: Possession offences: Section 57 is dealing with possessing articles for the purpose of terrorist acts. Section 58 is dealing with collecting or holding information that is of a kind likely to be useful to those involved in acts of terrorism. Section 57 includes a specific intention, section 58 does not.

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2000/ukpga_20000011_en_1

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2006/ukpga_20060011_en_1

Repeal the egregious parts of the Terrorism Act

The Terrorism Act 2000, later extended by the 2006 and 2008 acts, have introduced many egregious pieces of legislation onto the books.  The unnecessary and illiberal parts should be repealed.  Two suggestions from me are:
 

28 days detention without trial.  This is a ludicrously long period, the longest by far in the Western world, and I suggest that it should be shortend to 7 days, MAX.  If the police can't charge you after a week, they must release you.  Even that's pushing it.

Random stop and search.  The police have the power to stop and search anybody with NO justification whatsoever, on the vague notion of being a 'suspected terrorist'.  This is outrageous and has no place in a civilized, liberal society.  It should be scrapped and the police should need a reasonable suspicion of criminal intent before stopping and searching.

Why is this idea important?

The Terrorism Act 2000, later extended by the 2006 and 2008 acts, have introduced many egregious pieces of legislation onto the books.  The unnecessary and illiberal parts should be repealed.  Two suggestions from me are:
 

28 days detention without trial.  This is a ludicrously long period, the longest by far in the Western world, and I suggest that it should be shortend to 7 days, MAX.  If the police can't charge you after a week, they must release you.  Even that's pushing it.

Random stop and search.  The police have the power to stop and search anybody with NO justification whatsoever, on the vague notion of being a 'suspected terrorist'.  This is outrageous and has no place in a civilized, liberal society.  It should be scrapped and the police should need a reasonable suspicion of criminal intent before stopping and searching.

Scrap the terrorism act

It has become a catch-all excuse for the police to cite when they act in a heavy handed way and goes against the ethos of a democracy.  For one recent example, google 'the romford incident'

Why is this idea important?

It has become a catch-all excuse for the police to cite when they act in a heavy handed way and goes against the ethos of a democracy.  For one recent example, google 'the romford incident'

Silly laws parading as Prevention of Terrorism

Somebody taking photos of policemen, or of Guards on parade, or of the Palaces of Westminster are NOT terrorists, nor are they in the vast majority of cases even remotely involved in terrorist activities. Being arrested for such activity is stupid.

Repeal these unnecessary and probably unintended by products of the Prevention of Terrorism Act

Why is this idea important?

Somebody taking photos of policemen, or of Guards on parade, or of the Palaces of Westminster are NOT terrorists, nor are they in the vast majority of cases even remotely involved in terrorist activities. Being arrested for such activity is stupid.

Repeal these unnecessary and probably unintended by products of the Prevention of Terrorism Act

Repeal Section 44 (Terrorism Act 2000)

Section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000 gives wide-ranging stop-and-search powers to the Police without requiring prior reason, these are used frequently to stop photographers, campers, members of parliament, cricketers and BBC staff from undertaking their normal day-to-day activities:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrorism_Act_2000#Section_44_powers_.28stop_and_search.29
 

Why is this idea important?

Section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000 gives wide-ranging stop-and-search powers to the Police without requiring prior reason, these are used frequently to stop photographers, campers, members of parliament, cricketers and BBC staff from undertaking their normal day-to-day activities:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrorism_Act_2000#Section_44_powers_.28stop_and_search.29