Make the 1st hour free in all public UK car parks

Here is an idea to kick start the economy, especially in towns and cities dominated by supermarkets where smaller businesses are often loosing out becuase its free to park at the supermarket wheres its not to go and visit all the independant shops, retailers, markets and banks.  

Simply make the 1st hour parking in all public car parks free – This will open up our town centres again and boost trade. The cost of doing this could be recouped from the additional commerce this would bring.

Why is this idea important?

Here is an idea to kick start the economy, especially in towns and cities dominated by supermarkets where smaller businesses are often loosing out becuase its free to park at the supermarket wheres its not to go and visit all the independant shops, retailers, markets and banks.  

Simply make the 1st hour parking in all public car parks free – This will open up our town centres again and boost trade. The cost of doing this could be recouped from the additional commerce this would bring.

Remove Kerbside Railings in Cities

Kerbside railings are an impediment to the free movement of pedestrians in Cities.

You want to cross to the shop or bus stop directly on the other side. But you are blocked by railings. So you must walk a hundred metres to the traffic lights where the state allows you to cross. By this time, you are in a thick crowd also wanting to cross, that you might have avoided if not for the railings. There is another thick crowd on the other side. The island in the middle of the road is a long narrow cage with narrow doorways and either end. One crowd meets the other on the island, people squeezing though each other, to get to through to opposite end of the island from where they stepped onto it, to exit back into the road.

Once on the other side of the road you begin your walk of a hundred metres back in the opposite direction to the one in which you set out, to get to the shop or bus stop that was directly opposite you when you started.

This is madness. In continental/European cities these things are scarce. They are seldom used, but where they are, they are short.

British cities, such as London, should be practically devoid of them.

Why is this idea important?

Kerbside railings are an impediment to the free movement of pedestrians in Cities.

You want to cross to the shop or bus stop directly on the other side. But you are blocked by railings. So you must walk a hundred metres to the traffic lights where the state allows you to cross. By this time, you are in a thick crowd also wanting to cross, that you might have avoided if not for the railings. There is another thick crowd on the other side. The island in the middle of the road is a long narrow cage with narrow doorways and either end. One crowd meets the other on the island, people squeezing though each other, to get to through to opposite end of the island from where they stepped onto it, to exit back into the road.

Once on the other side of the road you begin your walk of a hundred metres back in the opposite direction to the one in which you set out, to get to the shop or bus stop that was directly opposite you when you started.

This is madness. In continental/European cities these things are scarce. They are seldom used, but where they are, they are short.

British cities, such as London, should be practically devoid of them.

Permitted Development Rights – Planning

Town planners often remove permitted development rights when approving planning permission for certain developments.  This is often heavy handed and restricts the developer and future owners to making improvements including to improve the environmental performance of a property.  It restricts addition of renewable energy generation schemes including solar panels, wind turbines and solid fuel burners (where additional flues/chimneys are required).

My suggestion is to ensure that planning officers, committees and authorities cannot remove all permitted development rights from property developments out of a matter of course and have to follow strict guidance when applying any restrictions, and that restrictions can only be applied after approval by the Planning Inspectorate

Furthermore, limited permitted development rights should be granted to listed buildings, following strict guidance.

Planningguidanceshould come from central government and local interpretation should be reduced.  More powershouldbe given to parish councils to have their say in planning approvals.

Why is this idea important?

Town planners often remove permitted development rights when approving planning permission for certain developments.  This is often heavy handed and restricts the developer and future owners to making improvements including to improve the environmental performance of a property.  It restricts addition of renewable energy generation schemes including solar panels, wind turbines and solid fuel burners (where additional flues/chimneys are required).

My suggestion is to ensure that planning officers, committees and authorities cannot remove all permitted development rights from property developments out of a matter of course and have to follow strict guidance when applying any restrictions, and that restrictions can only be applied after approval by the Planning Inspectorate

Furthermore, limited permitted development rights should be granted to listed buildings, following strict guidance.

Planningguidanceshould come from central government and local interpretation should be reduced.  More powershouldbe given to parish councils to have their say in planning approvals.

Litter in Towns

Every shopkeeper/trader in the country should be responsible for cleaning and clearing mess/litter from the immediate area outside of their shop/store. 

This would be from the side boundary of the shop to the centre line of the road in front of the shop, or 20m from the shop front.

Why is this idea important?

Every shopkeeper/trader in the country should be responsible for cleaning and clearing mess/litter from the immediate area outside of their shop/store. 

This would be from the side boundary of the shop to the centre line of the road in front of the shop, or 20m from the shop front.