Regulate Scrap Metal Collectors

Bring the growing 'community' of scrap metial collectors/dealers into a lawfully-managed framework.

Limit the frequency of collections. Give people the right to know where their scrap metal is going.

Allow genuine operators to prosper, but stop cowboys or rogue traders operating.

Why is this idea important?

Bring the growing 'community' of scrap metial collectors/dealers into a lawfully-managed framework.

Limit the frequency of collections. Give people the right to know where their scrap metal is going.

Allow genuine operators to prosper, but stop cowboys or rogue traders operating.

Tighten up consumer law to defend our rights

That the practice of stores selling say a bottle of wine at X in one store and Y in another, should be banned. It is reasonable to charge more in London where rents are higher, or in the Highlands because of distance involved, but where there is really no difference ie between two stores in Surrey, it should be stopped.

Furthermore, when looking to buy decorative stuff for my sitting room, I found that although they come from the same warehouse, one website within a group may charge thirteen pounds more for the same item, than another website owned by the same company. This is especially common at the biggest household name mail order companies.

I complained to Trading Standards and was told it's legal. It shouldn't be.

Why is this idea important?

That the practice of stores selling say a bottle of wine at X in one store and Y in another, should be banned. It is reasonable to charge more in London where rents are higher, or in the Highlands because of distance involved, but where there is really no difference ie between two stores in Surrey, it should be stopped.

Furthermore, when looking to buy decorative stuff for my sitting room, I found that although they come from the same warehouse, one website within a group may charge thirteen pounds more for the same item, than another website owned by the same company. This is especially common at the biggest household name mail order companies.

I complained to Trading Standards and was told it's legal. It shouldn't be.

Simplify the Infant Formula and Follow-on Formula Regulations

The Infant Formula and Follow-on Formula Regulations were revised in 2006, but the last government ignored the advice of Trading Standards officers, LACORS, its own Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition and other health experts by failing to bring the measures into line with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes and subsequent, relevant Resolutions of the World Health Assembly.

Doing so, would save the taxpayer many millions of pounds by reducing expenditure on treating illness associated with poor and misleading information from baby milk companies and by making the operations of Trading Standards more efficient.

The last government commissioned a review on the operation of the law which commented on shortcomings in the law and concluded there need to be 'steps taken to address these'.

Why is this idea important?

The Infant Formula and Follow-on Formula Regulations were revised in 2006, but the last government ignored the advice of Trading Standards officers, LACORS, its own Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition and other health experts by failing to bring the measures into line with the International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes and subsequent, relevant Resolutions of the World Health Assembly.

Doing so, would save the taxpayer many millions of pounds by reducing expenditure on treating illness associated with poor and misleading information from baby milk companies and by making the operations of Trading Standards more efficient.

The last government commissioned a review on the operation of the law which commented on shortcomings in the law and concluded there need to be 'steps taken to address these'.

Eliminate limits on Sunday trading hours

As a capitalist country there should not be limits on retail trading hours, trading hours should be governed by demand not government!  Restricting retail hours on Sundays is against capitalism.  As Christians we complain how other governments have laws based on their religious beliefs when it comes to business yet we do the same. 

Why is this idea important?

As a capitalist country there should not be limits on retail trading hours, trading hours should be governed by demand not government!  Restricting retail hours on Sundays is against capitalism.  As Christians we complain how other governments have laws based on their religious beliefs when it comes to business yet we do the same. 

Simplify Pricing Regulations

The regulations surrounding the pricing of retail goods should be simplified to the extent that only a single selling price can be shown. i.e. no "was", no "RRP" or "MRP", no "Buy one get one free", or any other similar gimmicks. Just one selling price per unit sold.

This would mean no price establishing by retailers is required. It means the general public would always get the best price without the confusion of trying to figure out what something actually costs. It means honest retailers don't lose out to dishonest retailers.

Why is this idea important?

The regulations surrounding the pricing of retail goods should be simplified to the extent that only a single selling price can be shown. i.e. no "was", no "RRP" or "MRP", no "Buy one get one free", or any other similar gimmicks. Just one selling price per unit sold.

This would mean no price establishing by retailers is required. It means the general public would always get the best price without the confusion of trying to figure out what something actually costs. It means honest retailers don't lose out to dishonest retailers.

Ticket restrictions

Stop organisations (particularly rail, airlines, concerts & sports) having rules re transferrability of tickets (other than for security) that can cause great expense for the unwary ticket holder.  Examples are where the organisations :-

a) prevent names being changed –  as with airlines where an error has occurred in nameing the pasenger. 

b) ban the transfer of tickets – as do rail companies and organisers of concerts, sports events, etc.

c) prevent a passenger joining part way through the journey – e.g. a ticket from Newcastle to London, but joining the train at Darlington. 

Why is this idea important?

Stop organisations (particularly rail, airlines, concerts & sports) having rules re transferrability of tickets (other than for security) that can cause great expense for the unwary ticket holder.  Examples are where the organisations :-

a) prevent names being changed –  as with airlines where an error has occurred in nameing the pasenger. 

b) ban the transfer of tickets – as do rail companies and organisers of concerts, sports events, etc.

c) prevent a passenger joining part way through the journey – e.g. a ticket from Newcastle to London, but joining the train at Darlington. 

Underage Drinking Responsibility

I think that it is unfair that as a shop employee I can be held personally accountable for selling alcohol to anyone under the age of 18. Also that trading standards have been known to send people into the shop where I work that look well over the age of 18.

Currently we can pay an on-the-spot fine or take the matter to court. If we take the matter to court you may be issued with a £1,000 fine and a Criminal Record.

I believe that it should always be the business that it held responsible, or that the appeals process should be made fairer on shop-workers. I am law abiding I have 3 jobs and I don't have the choice of what department to work on in my Supermarket. I am a checkout worker and think that this is one of the more un-fair laws that exist.

I challenge when I think an individual looks under the age of 25, however even that is sometimes hard to determine and when you ask someone there age and it turns out their 30 then the situation can turn intimidating.

So please think about the people that sell you your weekly shopping and are put under this additional appeals process pressure and change it.

Why is this idea important?

I think that it is unfair that as a shop employee I can be held personally accountable for selling alcohol to anyone under the age of 18. Also that trading standards have been known to send people into the shop where I work that look well over the age of 18.

Currently we can pay an on-the-spot fine or take the matter to court. If we take the matter to court you may be issued with a £1,000 fine and a Criminal Record.

I believe that it should always be the business that it held responsible, or that the appeals process should be made fairer on shop-workers. I am law abiding I have 3 jobs and I don't have the choice of what department to work on in my Supermarket. I am a checkout worker and think that this is one of the more un-fair laws that exist.

I challenge when I think an individual looks under the age of 25, however even that is sometimes hard to determine and when you ask someone there age and it turns out their 30 then the situation can turn intimidating.

So please think about the people that sell you your weekly shopping and are put under this additional appeals process pressure and change it.