We need an industrial policy

It is no good hoping that the private sector will create jobs without help or at least the government creating a benign environment for business.

We have had decades of indifference to manufacturing and engineering from politicians, many of whom seem to have little affinity or sense of importance of manufacturing. 

If anything the manufacturing is still shrinking.  It simply does not pay to employ lots of people in the UK.  The government need to reduce the cost of doing business in the UK so that when American, Japanese or Chinese move to the EU, they choose to come to Britain.

Goodwill alone is not good enough.

Why is this idea important?

It is no good hoping that the private sector will create jobs without help or at least the government creating a benign environment for business.

We have had decades of indifference to manufacturing and engineering from politicians, many of whom seem to have little affinity or sense of importance of manufacturing. 

If anything the manufacturing is still shrinking.  It simply does not pay to employ lots of people in the UK.  The government need to reduce the cost of doing business in the UK so that when American, Japanese or Chinese move to the EU, they choose to come to Britain.

Goodwill alone is not good enough.

EU Common Fishery Policy quotas

Bring an end to the lunacy of the current EU Common Fishery Policy quotas that do the very opposite of what they originally set out to achieve.

This will not happen until such time as the Commission, its advisers and those policing its policies get it into their tiny minds that there can be no conservation whilst we continue to return large quantities of perfectly healthy but unwanted or immature fish to the sea – dead.

A quota regime that totally ignores in its calculations that portion of the catch that is discarded has no place in a conservation policy. It is high time that any controls were based on the entire catch and not just on the landed portion.

Other than EU politicians, who will defend their beloved quota until the seas dry up, this failing is universally recognised especially by fishermen themselves.

What is surely needed is a quota based on catches not landings, a requirement to land the entire catch, a system that will allow governments to make local decisions to ban fishing in areas from which large volumes of immature fish are being taken and an increase in net mesh size if appropriate.

(I don't know how this diktat is integrated into British law – presumably it's there somewhere!)

Why is this idea important?

Bring an end to the lunacy of the current EU Common Fishery Policy quotas that do the very opposite of what they originally set out to achieve.

This will not happen until such time as the Commission, its advisers and those policing its policies get it into their tiny minds that there can be no conservation whilst we continue to return large quantities of perfectly healthy but unwanted or immature fish to the sea – dead.

A quota regime that totally ignores in its calculations that portion of the catch that is discarded has no place in a conservation policy. It is high time that any controls were based on the entire catch and not just on the landed portion.

Other than EU politicians, who will defend their beloved quota until the seas dry up, this failing is universally recognised especially by fishermen themselves.

What is surely needed is a quota based on catches not landings, a requirement to land the entire catch, a system that will allow governments to make local decisions to ban fishing in areas from which large volumes of immature fish are being taken and an increase in net mesh size if appropriate.

(I don't know how this diktat is integrated into British law – presumably it's there somewhere!)

empty shops….. coffee shops?

Now call me crazy, but surely everyone must have noticed the increasing amounts of empty shops in towns caused by the recession in this country. If some of these were turned in to Amsterdam style coffeeshops, I am fairly sure that they would stay open. The demand for cannabis is so great it is truly staggering, all I have heard for the past decade is disappointed cannabis users complaining how much effort it takes to get cannabis, I have heard stories of 400 mile round trips to obtain a few grams of grass. But no matter how hard it is to get, people always do.

There is nothing that this government can do to stop people obtaining and smoking cannabis, it will never end. 

Why not use this obvious mass market and make it a part of our (clearly failing) economy. We could easily regulate this plant and people will want to buy it. Don't get me wrong, a license to sell cannabis should be extremely difficult (but not impossible) to get, and very easy to lose.

Why is this idea important?

Now call me crazy, but surely everyone must have noticed the increasing amounts of empty shops in towns caused by the recession in this country. If some of these were turned in to Amsterdam style coffeeshops, I am fairly sure that they would stay open. The demand for cannabis is so great it is truly staggering, all I have heard for the past decade is disappointed cannabis users complaining how much effort it takes to get cannabis, I have heard stories of 400 mile round trips to obtain a few grams of grass. But no matter how hard it is to get, people always do.

There is nothing that this government can do to stop people obtaining and smoking cannabis, it will never end. 

Why not use this obvious mass market and make it a part of our (clearly failing) economy. We could easily regulate this plant and people will want to buy it. Don't get me wrong, a license to sell cannabis should be extremely difficult (but not impossible) to get, and very easy to lose.

let milk be milk – repealing pasteurisation laws

To allow organic farmers to sell their milk unpasteurised once again – as far as I can tell, this is due to economic pressure by the FSA (food standards authority)

Why is this idea important?

To allow organic farmers to sell their milk unpasteurised once again – as far as I can tell, this is due to economic pressure by the FSA (food standards authority)

Promotion of British Science

We should enact special tax provision to ensure science is brought to the forefront of life in Britain where currently it is sidelined into an also-ran role for geeks.

The way we can do this is by providing science (and engineering) with special tax privelages for those individuals and companies actively 'doing' it. All the way from the schools and colleges up to Nobel science prize-winners we need to support it.

E.G how about no college fees and free loans to physics and chemistry students to stimulate interest. When they take up employment in 'real' industry here in the UK (but not if they get spirited away to America), give them a lower tax rate for the duration to live and work for a British-owned company. Likewise preferential loan and tax rates for enginering companies. Its all very well making interesting TV programs about it, but you have to back it up with real financial incentives. By the same token we need to discourage the blue-sky, and 'humanities' -type subjects. We can't afford luxuries which don't create industrial strength or generate real wealth.

Why is this idea important?

We should enact special tax provision to ensure science is brought to the forefront of life in Britain where currently it is sidelined into an also-ran role for geeks.

The way we can do this is by providing science (and engineering) with special tax privelages for those individuals and companies actively 'doing' it. All the way from the schools and colleges up to Nobel science prize-winners we need to support it.

E.G how about no college fees and free loans to physics and chemistry students to stimulate interest. When they take up employment in 'real' industry here in the UK (but not if they get spirited away to America), give them a lower tax rate for the duration to live and work for a British-owned company. Likewise preferential loan and tax rates for enginering companies. Its all very well making interesting TV programs about it, but you have to back it up with real financial incentives. By the same token we need to discourage the blue-sky, and 'humanities' -type subjects. We can't afford luxuries which don't create industrial strength or generate real wealth.

Legalise Filesharing

Filesharers have long been accused of stealing, with ad campaigns telling is that downloading a film is the equivalent of stealing a DVD.

That is simply not the case:

For a start, when filesharing one is not taking anything of material or intrinsic value. One is taking copying and taking a file, that is, a collection of 1s and 0s.

Digital media can be copied instantly and sent to anyone on the globe with an internet connection at incredible speed, free of charge. To allow large corporations to charge money for this sort of media is absurd; it's like making people pay for air.

The media conglomerates say that they are losing revenue. They are only losing a nominal sum of money. Truth be told it cannot be quantified, but let me just say this: someone who downloads a film or album free of charge, illegally, in 90% of cases would not have purchased it anyway. Therefore they are not depriving anyone of any income.

Films and music will always be profitable; there is such thing as a cinema and a concert. To say that a downloaded copy of a film or album is the same as a cinema showing or concert (which one must pay for to enter) is complete nonsense. To say that people will prefer the former to the latter is also nonsense; fans will always want the true, immersive experience you get in a cinema or concert.

Why is this idea important?

Filesharers have long been accused of stealing, with ad campaigns telling is that downloading a film is the equivalent of stealing a DVD.

That is simply not the case:

For a start, when filesharing one is not taking anything of material or intrinsic value. One is taking copying and taking a file, that is, a collection of 1s and 0s.

Digital media can be copied instantly and sent to anyone on the globe with an internet connection at incredible speed, free of charge. To allow large corporations to charge money for this sort of media is absurd; it's like making people pay for air.

The media conglomerates say that they are losing revenue. They are only losing a nominal sum of money. Truth be told it cannot be quantified, but let me just say this: someone who downloads a film or album free of charge, illegally, in 90% of cases would not have purchased it anyway. Therefore they are not depriving anyone of any income.

Films and music will always be profitable; there is such thing as a cinema and a concert. To say that a downloaded copy of a film or album is the same as a cinema showing or concert (which one must pay for to enter) is complete nonsense. To say that people will prefer the former to the latter is also nonsense; fans will always want the true, immersive experience you get in a cinema or concert.

The new industry list for Britain

Create a list of new industries which Britain will develop as its long term economic base for the next 500 years which is sustainable and provides full employment for all able workers.

Why is this idea important?

Create a list of new industries which Britain will develop as its long term economic base for the next 500 years which is sustainable and provides full employment for all able workers.

Repeal excessive construction warning signs legislation

This proposal is to repeal the slew of laws and regulations relating to warning signs on and around construction sites.

Repealing the legislation that introduced these pointless warning signs will have no real impact on accidents at construction sites and will lower the cost of construction works – which affects both taxpayers and private investors.

Why is this idea important?

This proposal is to repeal the slew of laws and regulations relating to warning signs on and around construction sites.

Repealing the legislation that introduced these pointless warning signs will have no real impact on accidents at construction sites and will lower the cost of construction works – which affects both taxpayers and private investors.