Abolish the Charities Commission

This quango is a pointless exercise.  It does not have the resources to police charities properly and it employs people with inappropriate levels of expertise.  The consequence is that large (often corrupt) organisations are never scrutinised while small organisation may find themselves deluged with demands which undermine their viability.

As misused the Charity Commission uses the legislation to permit it to police itself and to ignore the purpose of the legislation that applies to it and its functions.

Companies House should be quite capable of fulfilling the role necessary.

Why is this idea important?

This quango is a pointless exercise.  It does not have the resources to police charities properly and it employs people with inappropriate levels of expertise.  The consequence is that large (often corrupt) organisations are never scrutinised while small organisation may find themselves deluged with demands which undermine their viability.

As misused the Charity Commission uses the legislation to permit it to police itself and to ignore the purpose of the legislation that applies to it and its functions.

Companies House should be quite capable of fulfilling the role necessary.

Amend waste control regulations to reduce stupid restrictions

Waste control regulations shouls be amended so that it is easier to recycle a businesses own general waste e.g. paper, cardboard and general office electrical items (computers, flourescent tubes etc.)

Why is this idea important?

Waste control regulations shouls be amended so that it is easier to recycle a businesses own general waste e.g. paper, cardboard and general office electrical items (computers, flourescent tubes etc.)

Refuse Collections should be green

At present there is a system where Councils will refuse to empty a refuse bin because it is too full and the lid is not closed properly. Householders are advised to take the excess to the Council Tip…………… or will they just fly tip it?

Well how green is that?  For the sake of a bin man (refuse disposal operative) wheeling a bin with the lid not tightly closed to a lorry, families have to get their car out and drive to the council tip ~ fuel emissions etc

Great, joined up "green thinking" this is not?

It is far greener, far more environmentally friendly for refuse to be collected in the simplest possible way. So if the wagon is passing by why leave the rubbish for the householder to dispose of because they have put out too much?   This invites fly tipping.

I propose a radical rethink of refuse collections and this should be Nationwide rather than by council or local authority.

Two Bins. Wet and Dry.

Wet for compostable material containing food, vegetable and garden waste.

Dry for everything else which is then sorted for recyclables and waste at regional centres.

All that is put out should be collected and sorted at the regional sorting centres.

It strikes me as inefficient, wasteful and illogical to have such local variations in the policy for dealing with household waste.

 

Why is this idea important?

At present there is a system where Councils will refuse to empty a refuse bin because it is too full and the lid is not closed properly. Householders are advised to take the excess to the Council Tip…………… or will they just fly tip it?

Well how green is that?  For the sake of a bin man (refuse disposal operative) wheeling a bin with the lid not tightly closed to a lorry, families have to get their car out and drive to the council tip ~ fuel emissions etc

Great, joined up "green thinking" this is not?

It is far greener, far more environmentally friendly for refuse to be collected in the simplest possible way. So if the wagon is passing by why leave the rubbish for the householder to dispose of because they have put out too much?   This invites fly tipping.

I propose a radical rethink of refuse collections and this should be Nationwide rather than by council or local authority.

Two Bins. Wet and Dry.

Wet for compostable material containing food, vegetable and garden waste.

Dry for everything else which is then sorted for recyclables and waste at regional centres.

All that is put out should be collected and sorted at the regional sorting centres.

It strikes me as inefficient, wasteful and illogical to have such local variations in the policy for dealing with household waste.

 

Remove WEEE Regulations for Small Businesses

Remove the requirement to join a producer scheme for small and medium sized enterprises.

The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations 2006 (WEEE Regulations) embody in UK law the requirements of the EU Directive 2002/96/EU. Typically, the regulations in other EU countries have been applied differently and allow exemptions for small businesses, but in the UK this is not so.

The WEEE Regulations place a requirement on companies to join a producer scheme, typically this costs £1000 per year, with additional costs depending on the amount of WEEE by weight placed on sale in the UK

The basic idea of these regulations is make manufacturers pay for the disposal costs of electrical equipment at the end of it's life, and there is some logic in this for mass produced items such as televisions. However for small companies the costs are disproportionate and the red tape is a nightmare.

There are many ridiculous aspects to this legislation.

– Producers that exclusively export (whether to the EU or rest of the world) are not covered

– Producers that make equipment in other countries for sale here are not covered

– The emphasis on the weight of the product is unfair on, for example, lathe manufacturers whose products contain lots of cast iron and concrete to make them heavy, and only a small proportion of electronics.

This is an excellent example of the UK "Gold Plating" an EU Directive

Why is this idea important?

Remove the requirement to join a producer scheme for small and medium sized enterprises.

The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulations 2006 (WEEE Regulations) embody in UK law the requirements of the EU Directive 2002/96/EU. Typically, the regulations in other EU countries have been applied differently and allow exemptions for small businesses, but in the UK this is not so.

The WEEE Regulations place a requirement on companies to join a producer scheme, typically this costs £1000 per year, with additional costs depending on the amount of WEEE by weight placed on sale in the UK

The basic idea of these regulations is make manufacturers pay for the disposal costs of electrical equipment at the end of it's life, and there is some logic in this for mass produced items such as televisions. However for small companies the costs are disproportionate and the red tape is a nightmare.

There are many ridiculous aspects to this legislation.

– Producers that exclusively export (whether to the EU or rest of the world) are not covered

– Producers that make equipment in other countries for sale here are not covered

– The emphasis on the weight of the product is unfair on, for example, lathe manufacturers whose products contain lots of cast iron and concrete to make them heavy, and only a small proportion of electronics.

This is an excellent example of the UK "Gold Plating" an EU Directive

Cut red tape on Bin Collection

The duty of care – environmental protction act 1990 and the enviromental protection duty of care regulations 1991 state that I must complete a waste transfer notice every year for each waste container I use. This basically states what type of waste I put in the bin and costs me £80 + VAT for each container per year (£160+VAT in my case) for the waste disposal company to administer this document.

 

In simple terms I put cardboard in the cardboard bin and general waste in the general waste bin. Others put glass in their glass bins, plastic in their plastic bin etc etc. To me this seems like a massive waste of time, resources and ultimately money for small businesses with no improved result.

Why is this idea important?

The duty of care – environmental protction act 1990 and the enviromental protection duty of care regulations 1991 state that I must complete a waste transfer notice every year for each waste container I use. This basically states what type of waste I put in the bin and costs me £80 + VAT for each container per year (£160+VAT in my case) for the waste disposal company to administer this document.

 

In simple terms I put cardboard in the cardboard bin and general waste in the general waste bin. Others put glass in their glass bins, plastic in their plastic bin etc etc. To me this seems like a massive waste of time, resources and ultimately money for small businesses with no improved result.

Focus On The Victims Of Crime

In our current fiscal situation, the UK is to lose a potential 65-000 police officers.  

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-10694895

Today, Louise Casey the Victims and Witness Commissioner has spoken freely of how the current judicial system is failing the victims of crime:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-10691151

With Kenneth Clarke looking for ways to cut the judicial system budget, it is prudent and respectful to those who have been a victim of crime to to receive the support they deserve and appropriate penalties should be focused on crime with a victim.  This is where law and order should be focused.

It is insulting to those who have suffered real crime to still place onus on catching people with cannabis, there is no victim involved with this plant, and resources simply cannot be spared on this unjust and futile war.  Alcohol is taking up an immeasurable amount of time, money and resources on the police, cannabis has never and can never create this drain on the force as an ingested substance; and as many senior members of the force have spoken out in ending the war on cannabis, please can they be listened to.  It is an infringement of everyone's civil liberties as it stands that cannabis is still given attention by law when violent crime is so prevalent.  Crime needs a victim, so please let's focus on that ethos.

Why is this idea important?

In our current fiscal situation, the UK is to lose a potential 65-000 police officers.  

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-10694895

Today, Louise Casey the Victims and Witness Commissioner has spoken freely of how the current judicial system is failing the victims of crime:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-10691151

With Kenneth Clarke looking for ways to cut the judicial system budget, it is prudent and respectful to those who have been a victim of crime to to receive the support they deserve and appropriate penalties should be focused on crime with a victim.  This is where law and order should be focused.

It is insulting to those who have suffered real crime to still place onus on catching people with cannabis, there is no victim involved with this plant, and resources simply cannot be spared on this unjust and futile war.  Alcohol is taking up an immeasurable amount of time, money and resources on the police, cannabis has never and can never create this drain on the force as an ingested substance; and as many senior members of the force have spoken out in ending the war on cannabis, please can they be listened to.  It is an infringement of everyone's civil liberties as it stands that cannabis is still given attention by law when violent crime is so prevalent.  Crime needs a victim, so please let's focus on that ethos.

stop councils criminalizing people over wheelie bins

Lets put a stop to the ridiculous amount of red tape which criminalises ordinary people for putting the wrong type of container into a wheelie bin or for the lid being open an inch.

Why is this idea important?

Lets put a stop to the ridiculous amount of red tape which criminalises ordinary people for putting the wrong type of container into a wheelie bin or for the lid being open an inch.

Give Communities the Power to Deal with their Own Food Waste

Allow communities to deal with their own food waste by removing the unnecessarily strict interpretation of the Animal By Products Regulations (ABPR) and increasing the limits of food waste which can be composted under a T23 anaerobic composting exemption.

Any community group which wishes to compost their own food waste must comply with the very strict time, temperature and particle size requirements set out in the Animal By Product Regulations. These regulations came into force in aftermath of Foot and Mouth and other crises to regulate collection, transport, storage, handling, processing and use of animal by products in EU Member States but their application in the UK has been far too restrictive.

Under the ABPR all catering waste must be composted in line with the ABPR. Catering Waste is defined  as ‘all waste food including used cooking oil originating in restaurants, catering facilities and kitchens, including central kitchens and household kitchens’ this includes waste from vegetarian kitchens, and no distinction is made for purely vegetable waste (DEFRA website). In practice this means that even a tea bag which may have theoretically touched some milk cannot be composted by community groups unless they can meet the strict guidelines set out in the ABPR.  This means that community groups wishing to compost their carrot peelings must be able to afford expensive in-vessel composting systems and the associated testing and recording.

 Those community groups which do manage to meet the requirements of the ABPR are then only allowed 10 tonnes of food waste on site at anyone time under a free exemption. As the quantities most community groups are processing are less than is financially sustainable for PAS100 accreditation the whole of the material – finished compost of excellent quality included is classed legally as food waste and thus limited to 10 tonnes on site at anyone time. Thus the free exemption treats normal kitchen waste in the same way as animal tissue waste (including blood and carcasses!). 

If groups cannot meet  these limits they must apply for a Standard Permit or Bespoke Permit. These permits were developed with large scale commercial composters in mind and cost thousands of pounds. As most community groups operate on tiny budgets, relying on the good will of volunteers these costs simply cannot be meet. 

Why is this idea important?

Allow communities to deal with their own food waste by removing the unnecessarily strict interpretation of the Animal By Products Regulations (ABPR) and increasing the limits of food waste which can be composted under a T23 anaerobic composting exemption.

Any community group which wishes to compost their own food waste must comply with the very strict time, temperature and particle size requirements set out in the Animal By Product Regulations. These regulations came into force in aftermath of Foot and Mouth and other crises to regulate collection, transport, storage, handling, processing and use of animal by products in EU Member States but their application in the UK has been far too restrictive.

Under the ABPR all catering waste must be composted in line with the ABPR. Catering Waste is defined  as ‘all waste food including used cooking oil originating in restaurants, catering facilities and kitchens, including central kitchens and household kitchens’ this includes waste from vegetarian kitchens, and no distinction is made for purely vegetable waste (DEFRA website). In practice this means that even a tea bag which may have theoretically touched some milk cannot be composted by community groups unless they can meet the strict guidelines set out in the ABPR.  This means that community groups wishing to compost their carrot peelings must be able to afford expensive in-vessel composting systems and the associated testing and recording.

 Those community groups which do manage to meet the requirements of the ABPR are then only allowed 10 tonnes of food waste on site at anyone time under a free exemption. As the quantities most community groups are processing are less than is financially sustainable for PAS100 accreditation the whole of the material – finished compost of excellent quality included is classed legally as food waste and thus limited to 10 tonnes on site at anyone time. Thus the free exemption treats normal kitchen waste in the same way as animal tissue waste (including blood and carcasses!). 

If groups cannot meet  these limits they must apply for a Standard Permit or Bespoke Permit. These permits were developed with large scale commercial composters in mind and cost thousands of pounds. As most community groups operate on tiny budgets, relying on the good will of volunteers these costs simply cannot be meet. 

Recycling for small businesses

End the law which states that small businesses cannot take their recycling to the public amenity tip. The recycling companies need more plastic to recycle to make a profit, so why not let small businesses take their plastic bottles to the tip, without needing a waste carriers licence.

Why is this idea important?

End the law which states that small businesses cannot take their recycling to the public amenity tip. The recycling companies need more plastic to recycle to make a profit, so why not let small businesses take their plastic bottles to the tip, without needing a waste carriers licence.

EU Common Fishery Policy quotas

Bring an end to the lunacy of the current EU Common Fishery Policy quotas that do the very opposite of what they originally set out to achieve.

This will not happen until such time as the Commission, its advisers and those policing its policies get it into their tiny minds that there can be no conservation whilst we continue to return large quantities of perfectly healthy but unwanted or immature fish to the sea – dead.

A quota regime that totally ignores in its calculations that portion of the catch that is discarded has no place in a conservation policy. It is high time that any controls were based on the entire catch and not just on the landed portion.

Other than EU politicians, who will defend their beloved quota until the seas dry up, this failing is universally recognised especially by fishermen themselves.

What is surely needed is a quota based on catches not landings, a requirement to land the entire catch, a system that will allow governments to make local decisions to ban fishing in areas from which large volumes of immature fish are being taken and an increase in net mesh size if appropriate.

(I don't know how this diktat is integrated into British law – presumably it's there somewhere!)

Why is this idea important?

Bring an end to the lunacy of the current EU Common Fishery Policy quotas that do the very opposite of what they originally set out to achieve.

This will not happen until such time as the Commission, its advisers and those policing its policies get it into their tiny minds that there can be no conservation whilst we continue to return large quantities of perfectly healthy but unwanted or immature fish to the sea – dead.

A quota regime that totally ignores in its calculations that portion of the catch that is discarded has no place in a conservation policy. It is high time that any controls were based on the entire catch and not just on the landed portion.

Other than EU politicians, who will defend their beloved quota until the seas dry up, this failing is universally recognised especially by fishermen themselves.

What is surely needed is a quota based on catches not landings, a requirement to land the entire catch, a system that will allow governments to make local decisions to ban fishing in areas from which large volumes of immature fish are being taken and an increase in net mesh size if appropriate.

(I don't know how this diktat is integrated into British law – presumably it's there somewhere!)

Supermarkets to contribute

Instead of householders paying more in council tax to enable the councils to recycle more why not ask the Supermarkets to contribute?

We, as the consumer, buy most of our food in packaging which we end up having to recycle. This is not a bad thing in asking us to put out the right bits in the right boxes thus reducing more that goes into landfill BUT why aren't the Supermarkets being asked to contribute to the recycling schemes. For example, they could pay for all the new recycling and wheelie bins that have recently been distrubted in our area as well as part funding the contractors costs for collecting.

 

Why is this idea important?

Instead of householders paying more in council tax to enable the councils to recycle more why not ask the Supermarkets to contribute?

We, as the consumer, buy most of our food in packaging which we end up having to recycle. This is not a bad thing in asking us to put out the right bits in the right boxes thus reducing more that goes into landfill BUT why aren't the Supermarkets being asked to contribute to the recycling schemes. For example, they could pay for all the new recycling and wheelie bins that have recently been distrubted in our area as well as part funding the contractors costs for collecting.

 

Repeal Environmental Permits for Reuse of Inert Waste in Construction

Remove the requirement under the Environmental Permitting Regulations 2010 to obtain an Environmental Permit for the re-use of inert wastes in construction.

Why is this idea important?

Remove the requirement under the Environmental Permitting Regulations 2010 to obtain an Environmental Permit for the re-use of inert wastes in construction.

Why waste even more money?!

Why waste more money to stop a law that has cost money and time in the first place? So in the end we have paid millions to go round in a circle and be back 2 square 1, and this is happening x100s. I suggested that Religious Education should be replaced with education on sexual abuse so that a child knows what to do. Mostchildren being abused still go to school and that way most children will be told rather than the people at home that are telling them that it is normal. Anyway I understand why it doesnt make sense for the site but it got a 2.2 rating when the highest scores are for tax havens and easier this and that-yeah you would want that idiots. You know that tax is the countrys income and we wouldnt have the NHS or education if we didnt put a little of our income and share it into billions. I know Im right because Im realistic so I dont know how many ideas are going to be used, and if any, then I regtret the way I voted and wanted it to turn out.

Why is this idea important?

Why waste more money to stop a law that has cost money and time in the first place? So in the end we have paid millions to go round in a circle and be back 2 square 1, and this is happening x100s. I suggested that Religious Education should be replaced with education on sexual abuse so that a child knows what to do. Mostchildren being abused still go to school and that way most children will be told rather than the people at home that are telling them that it is normal. Anyway I understand why it doesnt make sense for the site but it got a 2.2 rating when the highest scores are for tax havens and easier this and that-yeah you would want that idiots. You know that tax is the countrys income and we wouldnt have the NHS or education if we didnt put a little of our income and share it into billions. I know Im right because Im realistic so I dont know how many ideas are going to be used, and if any, then I regtret the way I voted and wanted it to turn out.

Amend the Hazardous Waste Regulations 2005/9

The Hazardous Waste Regulations 2005 (as amended 2009) require all producers of substances deemed hazardous waste (which covers a huge number of substances from used engine oil to fluorescent lights) to register with the Environment Agency and pay an annual fee, in return for which they receive a registration number and nothing else.  Companies which collect and dispose of hazardous waste are not permitted to collect waste from a producer who does not have a valid registration number.

So if you aren't registered, you cannot dispose of your waste through legal channels.  If you are a fly-tipper you aren't going to register anyway, and it is pretty unlikely that the government will come looking for you.  What we have is a scheme where law-abiding businesses pay millions of pounds a year so that the Government can employ staff to sit in an office and process hazardous waste producer registrations which are of no use to anyone.  Not to the businesses, not to the waste disposal companies, not to the Environment Agency.  It's a makework scheme funded by yet another tax on business, and a prime example of 'gold-plating' EU regulations to impose a burden on businesses that the EU itself never intended. Scrap it.

Why is this idea important?

The Hazardous Waste Regulations 2005 (as amended 2009) require all producers of substances deemed hazardous waste (which covers a huge number of substances from used engine oil to fluorescent lights) to register with the Environment Agency and pay an annual fee, in return for which they receive a registration number and nothing else.  Companies which collect and dispose of hazardous waste are not permitted to collect waste from a producer who does not have a valid registration number.

So if you aren't registered, you cannot dispose of your waste through legal channels.  If you are a fly-tipper you aren't going to register anyway, and it is pretty unlikely that the government will come looking for you.  What we have is a scheme where law-abiding businesses pay millions of pounds a year so that the Government can employ staff to sit in an office and process hazardous waste producer registrations which are of no use to anyone.  Not to the businesses, not to the waste disposal companies, not to the Environment Agency.  It's a makework scheme funded by yet another tax on business, and a prime example of 'gold-plating' EU regulations to impose a burden on businesses that the EU itself never intended. Scrap it.

introduce tax on more food

There is so much wastage on food and drink in the UK.

We should tax higher for foods with very high fat and/or very high sugar and or high salt content.

We should eat less and  use our money more wisely.

Fast food outlets hsoul serve smaller portions

We need a national food amnesty and obesity campaign starting in primary schools

We need to give more to charities.

Why is this idea important?

There is so much wastage on food and drink in the UK.

We should tax higher for foods with very high fat and/or very high sugar and or high salt content.

We should eat less and  use our money more wisely.

Fast food outlets hsoul serve smaller portions

We need a national food amnesty and obesity campaign starting in primary schools

We need to give more to charities.

Why save money in the NHS if your punished for it?

There are two issues here. The NHS wastes so much of the money it invests because managers and consultants (buisness one's) don't have the relevant backgrounds to understand the 'ethos' of the NHS, they look purely at management styles and techniques inherited from the buisness sector.. Often contracts are agreed that tie the NHS to over inflated contractors who know the NHS 'must' have it, so they inflate the price. I have seen so much wasted investment over the 27yrs I have worked in the NHS in varying fields.

A suggestion I would make is to free up the ability of the ward managers to shop around for goods and services like we can all do. The current system which punishes an underspend at the end of the year is mindless and gives no incentivefor saving or being cost aware i.e Spend anything not spent or it will be deducted from next years money (because it will be seen that you mustn't have needed it to have saved it) is punishing good budgeting.. Allow any savings made to be added to the next years budget, so there's an incentive for the staff to be cost effective. If ward managers where allowed to shop around instead of being tied to NHS logistics etc who inflate costs because the NHS need it is wasteful. An example being.. I ordered a vaccination fridge from our suppliers (cost £600).. the same fridge I could have bought for £200.. 3 x the cost because I wasn't allowed to buy myself.. this is just a tiny example of the waste.. Printing/paper costs are wasteful due to having to scrap all the stock paper because we have to include someone elses logo on the paper, which isn't on the originals.. tons and tons of paper that is of no use.. surely, this corporate driven waste can be managed in another way?

I'm not going to go on because I doubt anything will happen as a result of this.. If you need or want to here more of my ideas then you have my details and I would be delighted to assist if I could.

 

Regards,

 

Joe Muller

Why is this idea important?

There are two issues here. The NHS wastes so much of the money it invests because managers and consultants (buisness one's) don't have the relevant backgrounds to understand the 'ethos' of the NHS, they look purely at management styles and techniques inherited from the buisness sector.. Often contracts are agreed that tie the NHS to over inflated contractors who know the NHS 'must' have it, so they inflate the price. I have seen so much wasted investment over the 27yrs I have worked in the NHS in varying fields.

A suggestion I would make is to free up the ability of the ward managers to shop around for goods and services like we can all do. The current system which punishes an underspend at the end of the year is mindless and gives no incentivefor saving or being cost aware i.e Spend anything not spent or it will be deducted from next years money (because it will be seen that you mustn't have needed it to have saved it) is punishing good budgeting.. Allow any savings made to be added to the next years budget, so there's an incentive for the staff to be cost effective. If ward managers where allowed to shop around instead of being tied to NHS logistics etc who inflate costs because the NHS need it is wasteful. An example being.. I ordered a vaccination fridge from our suppliers (cost £600).. the same fridge I could have bought for £200.. 3 x the cost because I wasn't allowed to buy myself.. this is just a tiny example of the waste.. Printing/paper costs are wasteful due to having to scrap all the stock paper because we have to include someone elses logo on the paper, which isn't on the originals.. tons and tons of paper that is of no use.. surely, this corporate driven waste can be managed in another way?

I'm not going to go on because I doubt anything will happen as a result of this.. If you need or want to here more of my ideas then you have my details and I would be delighted to assist if I could.

 

Regards,

 

Joe Muller

Removal of RoHS and WEEE legislation

Both RoHS and WEEE legislation should be removed: they are a huge impediment to small businesses introducing any sort of electronic product. They are the product of a combination of mis-guided 'green' thnking and large business who are keen to supress innovation by smaller, more nimble operations.

The green product is the quality one that lasts for a long time!

Why is this idea important?

Both RoHS and WEEE legislation should be removed: they are a huge impediment to small businesses introducing any sort of electronic product. They are the product of a combination of mis-guided 'green' thnking and large business who are keen to supress innovation by smaller, more nimble operations.

The green product is the quality one that lasts for a long time!

Place a lower limit on WEEE regulations

Currently, even if you build a single custom PC for a customer, you are classed as a "producer" and have to sign up to a "weee producer compliance scheme". Given that the cost of this is around £600/year, this is outrageous!

Why is this idea important?

Currently, even if you build a single custom PC for a customer, you are classed as a "producer" and have to sign up to a "weee producer compliance scheme". Given that the cost of this is around £600/year, this is outrageous!

social service waste

I know that the socila service waste money I good example of this is   they had own staff to control direct payments scheme Then they put it out of house but did not get rid o the staff who had done the job So it costs twice as much

Also they get more and more staff and see the clients less and less They are totally top heavy with admin staff

Why is this idea important?

I know that the socila service waste money I good example of this is   they had own staff to control direct payments scheme Then they put it out of house but did not get rid o the staff who had done the job So it costs twice as much

Also they get more and more staff and see the clients less and less They are totally top heavy with admin staff

A Single UK Environment Agency

My idea is to combine the Environment Agency (EA) and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) in addition to removing variations in application and interpretation of environmental regulations by the regional assemblies.

Why is this idea important?

My idea is to combine the Environment Agency (EA) and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) in addition to removing variations in application and interpretation of environmental regulations by the regional assemblies.