Legalize Segways, Go-Peds and other personal electric transporters

Please update outdated and archaic statutes to permit new electric vehicles to be ridden on the road like electric bicycles.

Personal transporters and electric scooters, e.g. the Segway Personal Transporter or the Go-Ped, are considered motorized vehicles by the Department for Transport and subject to road traffic laws. Oddly enough, electric bicycles, which are also powered, are waived from these requirements and are legal to ride in the United Kingdom without any encumbrances.

There are four laws that need to be updated to permit these vehicles to be used.

Highway Act of 1835
Road Vehicles (Construction & Use) Regulations 1986
Vehicle Excise and Registration Act 1994 (VERA) and
Road Traffic Act 1988.

The Highway Act of 1835 bans these vehicles from being operated on pavement or road in England Wales (Section 72 of the Highway Act 1835). Certain vehicles used by disabled drivers are exempted from these requirements but only where they use Class 2 or Class 3 invalid carriages. Scooters are not classed as invalid carriages and so cannot be used on pavements.

Under the Road Vehicles (Construction & Use) Regulations 1986, the Department of Transpor considers these electric scooters to be motor vehicles even though they travel at less than 18mph. These vehicles need to obtain registration and comply with basic safety standards. Most two-wheeled vehicles that travel faster than 4mph have to comply with the European Community Whole Vehicle Type Approval (ECWVTA), which came into operation on 17 June 1999. The European Union does not understand how to classify these new personal electric vehicles. Member countries can pass their own specific legislation to handle them but the United Kingdom has refused to do so. The European Commission have indicated to the DfT that:

“No EC whole vehicle type- approval has been sought as the Segways is not primarily intended to travel on the road. If this manufacturer (or manufacturer of a similarly propelled vehicle), should eventually decide to seek EC type approval for such a vehicle intended for road travel, [the Commission] consider that it would need to be on the basis of Directive 2002/24/EC on the type approval of two or three wheel vehicles.”

“Member States have the right to lay down the requirements which they consider are necessary to ensure the protection of road users (i.e. may fix the conditions for allowing non EC type-approved vehicles on its roads).”

The Vehicle Excise and Registration Act 1994 (VERA) also needs to be updated. This states that every mechanically propelled vehicle used or kept on a public road should be registered and licensed. Electric scooters are mechanically propelled so they require registration and a vehicle registration licence (tax disc). Additionally, the user would need a driving licence and motor insurance. This legislation also enforces certain construction and lighting requirements that should not be relevant to electric bicycle substitutes.

Because electric scooters do not meet the relevant requirements for use on UK roads, and because there is no separate legislation here for public road use by non-EC type-approved vehicles, they cannot be registered and licensed for use on a public road in the United Kingdom. As a consequence, any user of such a vehicle on a public road is likely at the very least to be committing the offences of using the vehicle without insurance and using the vehicle without an excise licence.

Finally, drivers of electric scooters are in breach of section 87 and section 143 of the Road Traffic Act 1988. As such drivers require a driving licence and third party insurance. Because these vehicles cannot be licensed for use on a road, they do not come within the categories of vehicle covered by a driving licence. Therefore, any person using an electric scooter on a road, even with the best of intentions, will be violating their driving licence.

Why is this idea important?

Please update outdated and archaic statutes to permit new electric vehicles to be ridden on the road like electric bicycles.

Personal transporters and electric scooters, e.g. the Segway Personal Transporter or the Go-Ped, are considered motorized vehicles by the Department for Transport and subject to road traffic laws. Oddly enough, electric bicycles, which are also powered, are waived from these requirements and are legal to ride in the United Kingdom without any encumbrances.

There are four laws that need to be updated to permit these vehicles to be used.

Highway Act of 1835
Road Vehicles (Construction & Use) Regulations 1986
Vehicle Excise and Registration Act 1994 (VERA) and
Road Traffic Act 1988.

The Highway Act of 1835 bans these vehicles from being operated on pavement or road in England Wales (Section 72 of the Highway Act 1835). Certain vehicles used by disabled drivers are exempted from these requirements but only where they use Class 2 or Class 3 invalid carriages. Scooters are not classed as invalid carriages and so cannot be used on pavements.

Under the Road Vehicles (Construction & Use) Regulations 1986, the Department of Transpor considers these electric scooters to be motor vehicles even though they travel at less than 18mph. These vehicles need to obtain registration and comply with basic safety standards. Most two-wheeled vehicles that travel faster than 4mph have to comply with the European Community Whole Vehicle Type Approval (ECWVTA), which came into operation on 17 June 1999. The European Union does not understand how to classify these new personal electric vehicles. Member countries can pass their own specific legislation to handle them but the United Kingdom has refused to do so. The European Commission have indicated to the DfT that:

“No EC whole vehicle type- approval has been sought as the Segways is not primarily intended to travel on the road. If this manufacturer (or manufacturer of a similarly propelled vehicle), should eventually decide to seek EC type approval for such a vehicle intended for road travel, [the Commission] consider that it would need to be on the basis of Directive 2002/24/EC on the type approval of two or three wheel vehicles.”

“Member States have the right to lay down the requirements which they consider are necessary to ensure the protection of road users (i.e. may fix the conditions for allowing non EC type-approved vehicles on its roads).”

The Vehicle Excise and Registration Act 1994 (VERA) also needs to be updated. This states that every mechanically propelled vehicle used or kept on a public road should be registered and licensed. Electric scooters are mechanically propelled so they require registration and a vehicle registration licence (tax disc). Additionally, the user would need a driving licence and motor insurance. This legislation also enforces certain construction and lighting requirements that should not be relevant to electric bicycle substitutes.

Because electric scooters do not meet the relevant requirements for use on UK roads, and because there is no separate legislation here for public road use by non-EC type-approved vehicles, they cannot be registered and licensed for use on a public road in the United Kingdom. As a consequence, any user of such a vehicle on a public road is likely at the very least to be committing the offences of using the vehicle without insurance and using the vehicle without an excise licence.

Finally, drivers of electric scooters are in breach of section 87 and section 143 of the Road Traffic Act 1988. As such drivers require a driving licence and third party insurance. Because these vehicles cannot be licensed for use on a road, they do not come within the categories of vehicle covered by a driving licence. Therefore, any person using an electric scooter on a road, even with the best of intentions, will be violating their driving licence.

Make it easier for cafes and pubs to have seats, tables & drinks outside.

Pubs and cafes have to apply for licences to put seats and tables outside, and then they are restricted on numbers, allowed hours, and positioning.  My idea is to loosen up the regulations on licencing of pavement usage outside of cafes and pubs.

Presumably there are already laws to prevent businesses from being a nuisance or an obstruction, so why do we need local authority departments presiding over yet more regulation, inspections & paperwork?

Why is this idea important?

Pubs and cafes have to apply for licences to put seats and tables outside, and then they are restricted on numbers, allowed hours, and positioning.  My idea is to loosen up the regulations on licencing of pavement usage outside of cafes and pubs.

Presumably there are already laws to prevent businesses from being a nuisance or an obstruction, so why do we need local authority departments presiding over yet more regulation, inspections & paperwork?

Cycling on Pavements

The rules that stop people cycling on pavements should go.  On some roads the pavement is the safest place to cycle.  For children or people with disabilities the pavement is the safest place to cycle. 

Having seen police enforcing this ridiculous law/rule with youngsters, when the pavement has always been used for cycling and then having to complete paperwork afterwards was idiotic.

A waste of police time and energy and bureaucracy gone totally insane.

(It seems OK for pwered mobility vehicles to go on pavements though – no logic from last government).

Good luck

Why is this idea important?

The rules that stop people cycling on pavements should go.  On some roads the pavement is the safest place to cycle.  For children or people with disabilities the pavement is the safest place to cycle. 

Having seen police enforcing this ridiculous law/rule with youngsters, when the pavement has always been used for cycling and then having to complete paperwork afterwards was idiotic.

A waste of police time and energy and bureaucracy gone totally insane.

(It seems OK for pwered mobility vehicles to go on pavements though – no logic from last government).

Good luck

Cycling

Revoke or change whatever law says that prohibits cycling on the pavement. It puts parents off taking their children cycling and most of the time pavements are empty.

Why is this idea important?

Revoke or change whatever law says that prohibits cycling on the pavement. It puts parents off taking their children cycling and most of the time pavements are empty.

Allow cycling on pavements

In some areas cyclist and pedestrians already share the use of pavements and walkways.  The law could be replaced by one effectively compelling cyclists to respect other pavement users, i.e. cycling dangerously or without due care and attention would be illegal.

Why is this idea important?

In some areas cyclist and pedestrians already share the use of pavements and walkways.  The law could be replaced by one effectively compelling cyclists to respect other pavement users, i.e. cycling dangerously or without due care and attention would be illegal.

Give pedestrians rights to the pavement

In recent times parking on the pavement has become "OK" – often blocking pedestrian access completely.  The law should be specific and make blocking the pavement illegal – without the need to prove obstruction.

Why is this idea important?

In recent times parking on the pavement has become "OK" – often blocking pedestrian access completely.  The law should be specific and make blocking the pavement illegal – without the need to prove obstruction.

Parking on pavements

Parking of vehicles on pavements should only be permitted if a gap is left wide enough to allow a wheelchair, disabled buggy or pushchair to pass on the pavement – perhaps a gap of 4ft/1.2metres; leaving a gap of less than this would constitute an offence.  At the moment, I believe obstruction has to be proved, which seems to be sufficiently difficult to rule out any prosecutions from ever being made.  Motorists therefore park on pavements with impunity, forcing people to move out into the traffic.  Specifying the size of gap to be left would make proof of an offence being committed quite straightforward.

Why is this idea important?

Parking of vehicles on pavements should only be permitted if a gap is left wide enough to allow a wheelchair, disabled buggy or pushchair to pass on the pavement – perhaps a gap of 4ft/1.2metres; leaving a gap of less than this would constitute an offence.  At the moment, I believe obstruction has to be proved, which seems to be sufficiently difficult to rule out any prosecutions from ever being made.  Motorists therefore park on pavements with impunity, forcing people to move out into the traffic.  Specifying the size of gap to be left would make proof of an offence being committed quite straightforward.

To re-balance fair road and pavement use for Pedestrians, Bicycles and Vehicles in accident the BIGGER vehicle should always be blamed

In Holland, there is a Simple law that  – in case of an accident the bigger vehicle user is always at fault ie Trucks have to look out for cars, bikes and pedestrians, Cars for Bikes and pedestrians, and bicycles for pedestrians.

This is common sense and makes road and pavements fair for all users. 

It means cars have to drive more carefully around bicycles, and bicycles have to ride carefully around pedestrians. This law would be used in conjunction with repealing the law banning cycling on pavements – and ensures that cyclists respect pedestrians.

Why is this idea important?

In Holland, there is a Simple law that  – in case of an accident the bigger vehicle user is always at fault ie Trucks have to look out for cars, bikes and pedestrians, Cars for Bikes and pedestrians, and bicycles for pedestrians.

This is common sense and makes road and pavements fair for all users. 

It means cars have to drive more carefully around bicycles, and bicycles have to ride carefully around pedestrians. This law would be used in conjunction with repealing the law banning cycling on pavements – and ensures that cyclists respect pedestrians.

Cycling

Allow cycling on pavements unless prohibited. Many pavements (especially on main routes) are not used much by pedestrians BUT the road traffic is dangerous. Currently the law is no riding unless allowed (cycle paths). 

Why is this idea important?

Allow cycling on pavements unless prohibited. Many pavements (especially on main routes) are not used much by pedestrians BUT the road traffic is dangerous. Currently the law is no riding unless allowed (cycle paths).