Remove zig-zag lines from pedestrian crossings and create more parking spaces

Remove the 'no parking' zones around pedestrian crossings that are indicated by zig zag markings on the road and allow vehicles to park right up to (but not on) the crossing unless the whole road has other parking restrictions.

Why is this idea important?

Remove the 'no parking' zones around pedestrian crossings that are indicated by zig zag markings on the road and allow vehicles to park right up to (but not on) the crossing unless the whole road has other parking restrictions.

Remove Kerbside Railings in Cities

Kerbside railings are an impediment to the free movement of pedestrians in Cities.

You want to cross to the shop or bus stop directly on the other side. But you are blocked by railings. So you must walk a hundred metres to the traffic lights where the state allows you to cross. By this time, you are in a thick crowd also wanting to cross, that you might have avoided if not for the railings. There is another thick crowd on the other side. The island in the middle of the road is a long narrow cage with narrow doorways and either end. One crowd meets the other on the island, people squeezing though each other, to get to through to opposite end of the island from where they stepped onto it, to exit back into the road.

Once on the other side of the road you begin your walk of a hundred metres back in the opposite direction to the one in which you set out, to get to the shop or bus stop that was directly opposite you when you started.

This is madness. In continental/European cities these things are scarce. They are seldom used, but where they are, they are short.

British cities, such as London, should be practically devoid of them.

Why is this idea important?

Kerbside railings are an impediment to the free movement of pedestrians in Cities.

You want to cross to the shop or bus stop directly on the other side. But you are blocked by railings. So you must walk a hundred metres to the traffic lights where the state allows you to cross. By this time, you are in a thick crowd also wanting to cross, that you might have avoided if not for the railings. There is another thick crowd on the other side. The island in the middle of the road is a long narrow cage with narrow doorways and either end. One crowd meets the other on the island, people squeezing though each other, to get to through to opposite end of the island from where they stepped onto it, to exit back into the road.

Once on the other side of the road you begin your walk of a hundred metres back in the opposite direction to the one in which you set out, to get to the shop or bus stop that was directly opposite you when you started.

This is madness. In continental/European cities these things are scarce. They are seldom used, but where they are, they are short.

British cities, such as London, should be practically devoid of them.

Build footpaths in rural areas

Obesity in the UK is at an all time high, and we are constantly reminded by the government to walk more.

That's all very well unless you live in a rural area, where, more often and not, there are NO footpaths to walk on, forcing people to use a car for almost every journey.

Rural roads are highly dangerous for adults to walk along, and deathtraps for children. Simply slowing the speed of rural traffic down is not an answer to this problem, dedicated footpaths are needed.

The government could put some of the unemployed and unemployable to work building footpaths in rural areas to allow local people the choice of walking to work or to the shops.

Why is this idea important?

Obesity in the UK is at an all time high, and we are constantly reminded by the government to walk more.

That's all very well unless you live in a rural area, where, more often and not, there are NO footpaths to walk on, forcing people to use a car for almost every journey.

Rural roads are highly dangerous for adults to walk along, and deathtraps for children. Simply slowing the speed of rural traffic down is not an answer to this problem, dedicated footpaths are needed.

The government could put some of the unemployed and unemployable to work building footpaths in rural areas to allow local people the choice of walking to work or to the shops.

Give pedestrians rights to the pavement

In recent times parking on the pavement has become "OK" – often blocking pedestrian access completely.  The law should be specific and make blocking the pavement illegal – without the need to prove obstruction.

Why is this idea important?

In recent times parking on the pavement has become "OK" – often blocking pedestrian access completely.  The law should be specific and make blocking the pavement illegal – without the need to prove obstruction.

Repeal cycling Order

I would very much like to see the Cycling (Permission to Ride on Pavements in Greater London) Order repealed, along with the Cycling (Permission to Ignore Red Lights on Pedestrian Crossing in Greater London) Order.

These Orders in Council appear to have been made sometime during the 1990s while I was on a tour of duty abroad. Since I returned I have had, as a pedestrian, several close brushes with cyclists making the most of their newfound freedom. What is freedom for one group constitutes a restriction and a risk for another.

Here's hoping fairness and balance reigns.

Yours

J Reubin

Why is this idea important?

I would very much like to see the Cycling (Permission to Ride on Pavements in Greater London) Order repealed, along with the Cycling (Permission to Ignore Red Lights on Pedestrian Crossing in Greater London) Order.

These Orders in Council appear to have been made sometime during the 1990s while I was on a tour of duty abroad. Since I returned I have had, as a pedestrian, several close brushes with cyclists making the most of their newfound freedom. What is freedom for one group constitutes a restriction and a risk for another.

Here's hoping fairness and balance reigns.

Yours

J Reubin