The CSA need more powers to obtain information from self-employed parents

The Child Support Agency is a much needed agency and appears to be successful in straight forward cases, where the non-resident parent is not self-employed.  If the non-resident parent refuses to pay maintainance, then the agency can by pass the non-resident parent and contact their employer directly for the relevant information.  In these cases a calculation can be made and maintenance payments are deducted directly from the non-resident parent's wages.

However, as with my own experience, the situation is much more complicated if the non-resident parent is self-employed.  My ex partner was a partner in two limited companies.  The CSA have been involved in the case for 8 months but so far to little avail.  As my ex partner was his own employer, the CSA did not have the option to deduct payments directly from his wages.  Although when I first contacted the CSA last December they informed me that legal proceedings would be initiated if my ex partner failed to supply the necessary information and failed to make payments.  However it would appear that the CSA are limited by red tape and the law seems to be on the side of non paying non-resident parent.

It is a common misconception that the CSA has strong links with the Inland Revenue, when in fact they are not connected at all.  I suggest that a step in this direction would me most helpful to the CSA when dealing with non-compliant self-employed non-resident parents.

 

Why is this idea important?

The Child Support Agency is a much needed agency and appears to be successful in straight forward cases, where the non-resident parent is not self-employed.  If the non-resident parent refuses to pay maintainance, then the agency can by pass the non-resident parent and contact their employer directly for the relevant information.  In these cases a calculation can be made and maintenance payments are deducted directly from the non-resident parent's wages.

However, as with my own experience, the situation is much more complicated if the non-resident parent is self-employed.  My ex partner was a partner in two limited companies.  The CSA have been involved in the case for 8 months but so far to little avail.  As my ex partner was his own employer, the CSA did not have the option to deduct payments directly from his wages.  Although when I first contacted the CSA last December they informed me that legal proceedings would be initiated if my ex partner failed to supply the necessary information and failed to make payments.  However it would appear that the CSA are limited by red tape and the law seems to be on the side of non paying non-resident parent.

It is a common misconception that the CSA has strong links with the Inland Revenue, when in fact they are not connected at all.  I suggest that a step in this direction would me most helpful to the CSA when dealing with non-compliant self-employed non-resident parents.