Ban Party Lists at Elections

For some types of election votes get to choose between Party LIsts. This is profoundly undemocratic. Voters who are, say, left-leaning, cannot diffrentiate between a hard left idealist and a compromising pragmatist, whatever their preference.

Instead of decisions about which person is elected being made by 30,000 voters (or whatever), the decision is made by a selection committee of perhaps 12. Worst case the reality is that the Selection Committee Organiser effectively puts the list together on his or her own. The top candidate is guaranteed to be elected. The 20th placed is guaranteed not to.

If a prospective candidate upsets the wrong person a jumped up Party Discipline rule is invoked to get them suspended, and Hey Presto, they don't get on the list. Party machines have favourites and will do anything to displace who is at the top of the list and gettheir candidate there. Thatcher and Blair were outsiders would never have been high on a List (OK, bad example). Churchill was seen as a troublemaker past his prime – a List system would have put Chaimberlain clones above him.

It's a scheme that Danton would have loved during The Terror period of the French Revolution. Or Stalin.

Why is this idea important?

For some types of election votes get to choose between Party LIsts. This is profoundly undemocratic. Voters who are, say, left-leaning, cannot diffrentiate between a hard left idealist and a compromising pragmatist, whatever their preference.

Instead of decisions about which person is elected being made by 30,000 voters (or whatever), the decision is made by a selection committee of perhaps 12. Worst case the reality is that the Selection Committee Organiser effectively puts the list together on his or her own. The top candidate is guaranteed to be elected. The 20th placed is guaranteed not to.

If a prospective candidate upsets the wrong person a jumped up Party Discipline rule is invoked to get them suspended, and Hey Presto, they don't get on the list. Party machines have favourites and will do anything to displace who is at the top of the list and gettheir candidate there. Thatcher and Blair were outsiders would never have been high on a List (OK, bad example). Churchill was seen as a troublemaker past his prime – a List system would have put Chaimberlain clones above him.

It's a scheme that Danton would have loved during The Terror period of the French Revolution. Or Stalin.

AV Voting should allot points relating to order of preference

Points should be allotted according to people's preference when voting. If there are 5 candidates in the constituency, the candidate that is a person's first choice would be allotted 5 points, the second choice 4 points, the third choice 3 points etc.  This would obviously have to be adjusted depending on the number of candidates in a constituency, and there may need to be a larger difference between the number of points given for each position in the list. The candidate gaining the most points would win.

Why is this idea important?

Points should be allotted according to people's preference when voting. If there are 5 candidates in the constituency, the candidate that is a person's first choice would be allotted 5 points, the second choice 4 points, the third choice 3 points etc.  This would obviously have to be adjusted depending on the number of candidates in a constituency, and there may need to be a larger difference between the number of points given for each position in the list. The candidate gaining the most points would win.

AV referendum (not to be held on same day as other elections)

Not strictly a law to be repealed but it would be wholly wrong to have the AV referendum on the same day as other elections in Scotland and Wales. 

This would skew the turnout to be higher in some parts of the UK, rather than others, it would also distract voters in those areas from giving this very important decision their full attention.

Why is this idea important?

Not strictly a law to be repealed but it would be wholly wrong to have the AV referendum on the same day as other elections in Scotland and Wales. 

This would skew the turnout to be higher in some parts of the UK, rather than others, it would also distract voters in those areas from giving this very important decision their full attention.