Recreational Areas for Youths up to 21

My Idea is to create areas for the group of society who are not catered for because they are considered too old for playgrounds, and yet too young to go to places considered "Adult only" such as snooker halls, pubs etc…

 

There should be a series of discussions on this matter, with input from both the Senior Parliament, and the Youth Parliament, who contrary to popular belief do still exist. This needs to be sorted to stop this cycle of neglect.

Why is this idea important?

My Idea is to create areas for the group of society who are not catered for because they are considered too old for playgrounds, and yet too young to go to places considered "Adult only" such as snooker halls, pubs etc…

 

There should be a series of discussions on this matter, with input from both the Senior Parliament, and the Youth Parliament, who contrary to popular belief do still exist. This needs to be sorted to stop this cycle of neglect.

Repeal Diving at Work Regulations 1997 for Recreational Training

The Diving at Work Regulations 1997 regulations apply to all scuba diving for training in the UK. This includes both commercial and volunteer training. These regulations have been applied despite adequate self regulation by scuba diving training agencies (e.g. PADI, BSAC, etc). These regulations introduce unnecessary paperwork and effort, including:

  • Yearly medical checks for instructors
  • HSE risk assessments (including non-commercial instructors)
  • Redundancy of safety equipment – every group having their own emergency oxygen, when it could be provided at a central point at established diving locations
  • Unnecessary staffing requirements – this should be dictated by local conditions not blanket rules


These rules should be relaxed, eliminated or replaced by rules that are specifically designed for the wide range of conditions encountered in UK scuba diving training.

These regulations might be usefully retained for scuba diving involving police work, engineering work, etc. I am focusing on recreational diving training here.

Why is this idea important?

The Diving at Work Regulations 1997 regulations apply to all scuba diving for training in the UK. This includes both commercial and volunteer training. These regulations have been applied despite adequate self regulation by scuba diving training agencies (e.g. PADI, BSAC, etc). These regulations introduce unnecessary paperwork and effort, including:

  • Yearly medical checks for instructors
  • HSE risk assessments (including non-commercial instructors)
  • Redundancy of safety equipment – every group having their own emergency oxygen, when it could be provided at a central point at established diving locations
  • Unnecessary staffing requirements – this should be dictated by local conditions not blanket rules


These rules should be relaxed, eliminated or replaced by rules that are specifically designed for the wide range of conditions encountered in UK scuba diving training.

These regulations might be usefully retained for scuba diving involving police work, engineering work, etc. I am focusing on recreational diving training here.

Legalise cannabis for 18 year olds and over

Quite simply, the many arguments in favour outweigh those against.  In these austere times in particular  the government could do with the revenue, which could be used to help offset the disadvantages. 

Make available on prescription first, print health warnings on packets when it is sold in the shops.  As it can be eaten, Waitrose could make it available in cakes with no risk of adverse effects from smoking. 

It should be well regulated, though.  Highly concentrated strains should perhaps not be available or allowed to be grown. The very fact that drugs are demonised, when they patently carry benefits, sends a confusing message.  A more civilised, sophisticated approach to them is needed.

Why is this idea important?

Quite simply, the many arguments in favour outweigh those against.  In these austere times in particular  the government could do with the revenue, which could be used to help offset the disadvantages. 

Make available on prescription first, print health warnings on packets when it is sold in the shops.  As it can be eaten, Waitrose could make it available in cakes with no risk of adverse effects from smoking. 

It should be well regulated, though.  Highly concentrated strains should perhaps not be available or allowed to be grown. The very fact that drugs are demonised, when they patently carry benefits, sends a confusing message.  A more civilised, sophisticated approach to them is needed.