Repeal 1701 Act of Settlement that explicitly discriminates against Roman Catholics

Given the on-going debate in parliament – some of it ushered in via private members bills and the alike – of repealing discriminatory clauses extant in the 1701 Act of Settlement against Roman Catholics, it would be opportune to tackle this issue head-on and secure bi-partisan support for its repeal. In the context of civil liberties and the Human Rights Act, it is counter-progressive to allow such an archaic and discriminatory provision to remain on the statute books. Furthermore, past inertia on the issue needs to be changed and swift action taken to repeal a provision that is of concern for some Catholics in the United Kingdom who are, in this legal context, regarded as second class citizen. Repeal of this unnecessary and potentially internationally embarrassing Act in view of the upcoming Papal visit, would ensure consistency in the Government’s commitment to Human Rights for all its citizens, an essential prerequisite in a modern, pluralist society.  

Why is this idea important?

Given the on-going debate in parliament – some of it ushered in via private members bills and the alike – of repealing discriminatory clauses extant in the 1701 Act of Settlement against Roman Catholics, it would be opportune to tackle this issue head-on and secure bi-partisan support for its repeal. In the context of civil liberties and the Human Rights Act, it is counter-progressive to allow such an archaic and discriminatory provision to remain on the statute books. Furthermore, past inertia on the issue needs to be changed and swift action taken to repeal a provision that is of concern for some Catholics in the United Kingdom who are, in this legal context, regarded as second class citizen. Repeal of this unnecessary and potentially internationally embarrassing Act in view of the upcoming Papal visit, would ensure consistency in the Government’s commitment to Human Rights for all its citizens, an essential prerequisite in a modern, pluralist society.  

Repeal the 1701 Act of Settlement

Repeal the 1701 Act of Settlement, which bars non-Protestants, adopted children and people born to unmarried parents from succeeding to the throne.  It also discriminated against women by favouring male succession.

Why is this idea important?

Repeal the 1701 Act of Settlement, which bars non-Protestants, adopted children and people born to unmarried parents from succeeding to the throne.  It also discriminated against women by favouring male succession.

Repeal Act of Settlement 1701

The Act of Settlement is a major piece of anti-catholic legislation.  In 21st Century a country like ours should not enshrine religious discrimination in law.  I appreciate the difficulties that are involved in repealing this law  but it is a major insult to loyal British people who are also catholic. 

Why is this idea important?

The Act of Settlement is a major piece of anti-catholic legislation.  In 21st Century a country like ours should not enshrine religious discrimination in law.  I appreciate the difficulties that are involved in repealing this law  but it is a major insult to loyal British people who are also catholic. 

Repeal the Act of Settlement

I would repeal the Act of Settlement that prevents the Monarch being a Roman Catholic. It also prevents anyone with a claim to the throne marrying a Roman Catholic. The United Kingdom proclaims that it stands for freedom, fairness and democracy. How can the UK claim these things if it prevents its Head of State from believing in one of the long established brands of Christianity? Why should someone with a claim to the throne be forced to renounce their claim because they wish to marry a Roman Catholic? Why should a Roman Catholic feel forced to convert to remove the 'issue' for someone in line to throne?

 

Why is this idea important?

I would repeal the Act of Settlement that prevents the Monarch being a Roman Catholic. It also prevents anyone with a claim to the throne marrying a Roman Catholic. The United Kingdom proclaims that it stands for freedom, fairness and democracy. How can the UK claim these things if it prevents its Head of State from believing in one of the long established brands of Christianity? Why should someone with a claim to the throne be forced to renounce their claim because they wish to marry a Roman Catholic? Why should a Roman Catholic feel forced to convert to remove the 'issue' for someone in line to throne?