Remove requirement for top level football grounds to be all-seated

Section 11.1 of the Football Spectators Act provides the Secretary of State with the power to stipulate that certain football grounds are all-seated, a power that is currently applied to the top two divisions. This section should be repealed.

Practical experience shows that the all-seater rules are unenforceable. Every week, thousands of people stand in front of their seats for the duration of the game. Many who would like to sit down are unable to use their seats, as they find their view blocked. Varied and repeated attempts to tackle this practice have failed.

The evidence demonstrates that when those who wish to stand are provided with designated Safe Standing areas, the issue of standing in seated areas largely goes away. This benefits everyone.

In England and Wales, Safe Standing areas are permitted at rugby union and rugby league venues, as well as at speedway and horse racing events. Safe Standing is also allowed at football grounds outside the top two divisions, subject to the stringent standards laid down in the Government's Green Guide. The idea that the safety of an stadium depends on the type and quality of event happening on the pitch is absurd. This anomoly can best be tackled by removing section 11.1.

Why is this idea important?

Section 11.1 of the Football Spectators Act provides the Secretary of State with the power to stipulate that certain football grounds are all-seated, a power that is currently applied to the top two divisions. This section should be repealed.

Practical experience shows that the all-seater rules are unenforceable. Every week, thousands of people stand in front of their seats for the duration of the game. Many who would like to sit down are unable to use their seats, as they find their view blocked. Varied and repeated attempts to tackle this practice have failed.

The evidence demonstrates that when those who wish to stand are provided with designated Safe Standing areas, the issue of standing in seated areas largely goes away. This benefits everyone.

In England and Wales, Safe Standing areas are permitted at rugby union and rugby league venues, as well as at speedway and horse racing events. Safe Standing is also allowed at football grounds outside the top two divisions, subject to the stringent standards laid down in the Government's Green Guide. The idea that the safety of an stadium depends on the type and quality of event happening on the pitch is absurd. This anomoly can best be tackled by removing section 11.1.

Mixed Sports for Children – in particular Football

 

I write to you knowing that the country has a passion for football and what we think is a real injustice to a number of young female players.

I am the (proud) sponsor of an U13 team for the Guildford City Football Club – I love the game, I love the team and am ALWAYs amazed at the commitment of the kids, the parents and the managers and coaches at this level of football, and the benefits of football and other sports in dealing with issues such as diversity, sexual equality and inclusion at childrens critical development stages.

 

The FA has told us (between seasons) that we can no longer have mixed teams Under 13. For us, and for one 11 year old girl this is devastating – for 4 players in a team close to us (Worplesdon), it is devastating – for over 50 girls across the south of England – this is devastating – as well as to their parents, their teams and potentially their interest in football.

 

We believe in the FA Policy on Safeguarding Children, and in encouraging children of both sexes and all backgrounds to take part in sport.

 

We work hard to support this policy, as individuals, as members of the FA and coaches of our team. We work hard to build the team spirit and approach required to be a successful football team, but more than this, the experiences the whole team take away are life enhancing and socially beneficial.

 

Within a team like ours, where we deal with cultural and sexual diversity, this has created a team of well balanced individuals, who support each other, work hard for each other and together are greater than the sum of their parts.

 

Regardless of our children’s race, background or sex, we ensure that the full policy is adhered to. “Building relationships with parents and carers and including all families in club activities” is something we pride ourselves upon – and to take an 11 year old out of an established structure and team seems cruel on the part of the FA, and we cannot understand the reasoning behind it. It seems to go against the principles of equality in children and inclusion and diversity in activities.

 

We agree and concede, absolutely that in the current environment, mixed football teams are not achievable beyond a certain level. We believe that 13 is a good age for the segregation to begin – and having previously sought and been granted permission for our female player to continue with our team for another two seasons, until she is 13, (at her and her parents request, and the full support of the club, the other parents and kids), we are now faced with the possibility of brutally disappointing not only the individual concerned, but her parents and the entire team – it may even be enough to break her relationship with football at a time when she is really discovering her role on the field and demonstrating skills which outmatch her opponents on an alarmingly regular basis.

 

We are not the only team in this position – we are aware of a number of teams at a number of clubs now faced with a similar problem.

 

Surely a phased approach would be more sensible – for those already in the system, to remove them from established teams could be potentially damaging to the individuals, teams and sport. Closing the door for new players in mixed teams, but allowing those already in place to see out their time whilst reviewing their options.

 

Our kids, as do most of those we play against, take their football, their team-mates and their training seriously, but are also prone to being easily upset and disappointed – after all they are vulnerable – but surely we need to consider all aspects of this policy revision which prevents these children from continuing, and certainly we believe there should have been an increase level of consultation with the staff and coaches who put the effort in to train, organise and manage these teams before sweeping changes were brought into effect.

 

We have started an online petition (over 229 signatures today and growing), and a written petition (with over 1800 signatures so far) – we would love to get this issue into the open and under discussion. We are planning to deliver our petition to the FA at a suitable date in the near future, and would welcome any support you might feel you could give this cause!!  We love football – you love football – help us help kids who also love football.

 

Our petition is located at : http://www.petitiononline.com/fauk001/

 

I can be contacted on 07590351202

 

 

With Best Regards

 

Mark Holland

Guildford City Football Club "Wizards" Sponsor

 

 

 

 

Why is this idea important?

 

I write to you knowing that the country has a passion for football and what we think is a real injustice to a number of young female players.

I am the (proud) sponsor of an U13 team for the Guildford City Football Club – I love the game, I love the team and am ALWAYs amazed at the commitment of the kids, the parents and the managers and coaches at this level of football, and the benefits of football and other sports in dealing with issues such as diversity, sexual equality and inclusion at childrens critical development stages.

 

The FA has told us (between seasons) that we can no longer have mixed teams Under 13. For us, and for one 11 year old girl this is devastating – for 4 players in a team close to us (Worplesdon), it is devastating – for over 50 girls across the south of England – this is devastating – as well as to their parents, their teams and potentially their interest in football.

 

We believe in the FA Policy on Safeguarding Children, and in encouraging children of both sexes and all backgrounds to take part in sport.

 

We work hard to support this policy, as individuals, as members of the FA and coaches of our team. We work hard to build the team spirit and approach required to be a successful football team, but more than this, the experiences the whole team take away are life enhancing and socially beneficial.

 

Within a team like ours, where we deal with cultural and sexual diversity, this has created a team of well balanced individuals, who support each other, work hard for each other and together are greater than the sum of their parts.

 

Regardless of our children’s race, background or sex, we ensure that the full policy is adhered to. “Building relationships with parents and carers and including all families in club activities” is something we pride ourselves upon – and to take an 11 year old out of an established structure and team seems cruel on the part of the FA, and we cannot understand the reasoning behind it. It seems to go against the principles of equality in children and inclusion and diversity in activities.

 

We agree and concede, absolutely that in the current environment, mixed football teams are not achievable beyond a certain level. We believe that 13 is a good age for the segregation to begin – and having previously sought and been granted permission for our female player to continue with our team for another two seasons, until she is 13, (at her and her parents request, and the full support of the club, the other parents and kids), we are now faced with the possibility of brutally disappointing not only the individual concerned, but her parents and the entire team – it may even be enough to break her relationship with football at a time when she is really discovering her role on the field and demonstrating skills which outmatch her opponents on an alarmingly regular basis.

 

We are not the only team in this position – we are aware of a number of teams at a number of clubs now faced with a similar problem.

 

Surely a phased approach would be more sensible – for those already in the system, to remove them from established teams could be potentially damaging to the individuals, teams and sport. Closing the door for new players in mixed teams, but allowing those already in place to see out their time whilst reviewing their options.

 

Our kids, as do most of those we play against, take their football, their team-mates and their training seriously, but are also prone to being easily upset and disappointed – after all they are vulnerable – but surely we need to consider all aspects of this policy revision which prevents these children from continuing, and certainly we believe there should have been an increase level of consultation with the staff and coaches who put the effort in to train, organise and manage these teams before sweeping changes were brought into effect.

 

We have started an online petition (over 229 signatures today and growing), and a written petition (with over 1800 signatures so far) – we would love to get this issue into the open and under discussion. We are planning to deliver our petition to the FA at a suitable date in the near future, and would welcome any support you might feel you could give this cause!!  We love football – you love football – help us help kids who also love football.

 

Our petition is located at : http://www.petitiononline.com/fauk001/

 

I can be contacted on 07590351202

 

 

With Best Regards

 

Mark Holland

Guildford City Football Club "Wizards" Sponsor

 

 

 

 

Allow drinking on the football terraces

Drinking alcohol is sight of the playing area at professional football matches has been banned by law since 1985. The same activity is perfectly lawful at all other sporting events. If you're a fan of rugby league or rugby union – no problem. Likewise cricket, American Football, speedway, horse racing. Even tiddlywinks as far as we know.

Why should the law abiding majority of football fans be singled out?

Why is this idea important?

Drinking alcohol is sight of the playing area at professional football matches has been banned by law since 1985. The same activity is perfectly lawful at all other sporting events. If you're a fan of rugby league or rugby union – no problem. Likewise cricket, American Football, speedway, horse racing. Even tiddlywinks as far as we know.

Why should the law abiding majority of football fans be singled out?

National Sporting and Cultural Events

It should no longer be possible for a private company, which may be owned and operated by foreign nationals, to restrict the inalienable right of British people to view National Sporting and Cultural Events and Free to Air Television.

 

Why is this idea important?

It should no longer be possible for a private company, which may be owned and operated by foreign nationals, to restrict the inalienable right of British people to view National Sporting and Cultural Events and Free to Air Television.

 

Remove requirement for all-seater football stadiums

Most fans at matches want to stand on  terraces, but most are aware of the Health & Safety issues caused by unregulated terracing. There must be a way to accommodate fan's wishes safely.

Why is this idea important?

Most fans at matches want to stand on  terraces, but most are aware of the Health & Safety issues caused by unregulated terracing. There must be a way to accommodate fan's wishes safely.

Allow safe standing at Football matches

Follow the German model and allow safe standing at ALL domestic football matches in the UK. This would include all fixtures in the Premier League, Championship, League One and League Two as well as domestic cup competitions. The move to all seater stadia, which was only ever a recommendation of the Taylor Report and did not have to become law, has resulted in tens if not hundreds of thousands of fans being priced out of supporting their team. These loyal fans have been replaced with more and more corporate supporters and tourists which had led to a marked reduction in atmosphere. When the Taylor report suggested all seater stadia it also commented that this should not, necessarily, mean an increase in prices, sadly this has not been the case. The average price to attend a Premier League match in this country is now around the £40 mark. A limited return to standing along the lines of the Bundesliga would help to restore the atmosphere and allow friends to attend matches together again. The German experiment has proved that safe standing is possible and the number of clubs that now offer standing in the Budesliga has been further increased this summer. Please repeal this 'law' that requires stadia to be all seater and allow people to choose how they watch their sport as they do at Rugby andHorse racing for example.

Why is this idea important?

Follow the German model and allow safe standing at ALL domestic football matches in the UK. This would include all fixtures in the Premier League, Championship, League One and League Two as well as domestic cup competitions. The move to all seater stadia, which was only ever a recommendation of the Taylor Report and did not have to become law, has resulted in tens if not hundreds of thousands of fans being priced out of supporting their team. These loyal fans have been replaced with more and more corporate supporters and tourists which had led to a marked reduction in atmosphere. When the Taylor report suggested all seater stadia it also commented that this should not, necessarily, mean an increase in prices, sadly this has not been the case. The average price to attend a Premier League match in this country is now around the £40 mark. A limited return to standing along the lines of the Bundesliga would help to restore the atmosphere and allow friends to attend matches together again. The German experiment has proved that safe standing is possible and the number of clubs that now offer standing in the Budesliga has been further increased this summer. Please repeal this 'law' that requires stadia to be all seater and allow people to choose how they watch their sport as they do at Rugby andHorse racing for example.

World Cup failure due to health and safety / bad coaching.

Another World Cup failure precedes another inquisition. Amidst the predictable calls for the manager’s head, comes the equally predictable re-emergence of the ‘T’ word (Technique). The ‘T’ word is often prefixed by reference to an English footballer and his lack of it.

 The ‘T’ word is always followed by an investigation into our coaching methods and a rewriting of the coaching manuals.

 Coaching manuals should be stocked on the top shelf, where children can’t reach them.

 The Premier League is often hailed as the most exciting league in the world. It is exciting because it is error strewn and mishap laden. Spectating at a lower level is often as painful as it is hilarious. Under the present coaching regime, the future is ‘more of the same’.

 At present we have a two tier coaching system, whereby children come in to the game as young as 5 and are encouraged to leave their imagination at home. They enter a world of day-glow bibs and cones, under the supervision of someone’s dad with illusions of coaching the most successful under 9 team in history and the ensuing glory that would be reflected upon him. If  the lad comes through this stage of his development and show signs of  ability, he will be snapped up by his local club. Thus commences the second level of coaching, where we subdue any natural ability in a quest for all round team play and spatial awareness!

 I cite the case of James a local lad who first came to my attention aged 6. He came along to one of my indoor football sessions every week for approx 2 years. This was a mixed age group some of the lads were as much as 3 years older than James. Every Saturday morning, whilst I was encouraging this group to just enjoy playing football, James was having most fun of all doing what he loved best, scoring goals! Moving forward a couple of years, James was in the same under 10team as my son. I would go along to support Robbie, every Sunday morning, and would come home with tales of the most natural goal scorer I had seen, at any level (Jimmy Greaves included). I would take along the best goal scorers I had ever played with, to see James score goals, and they would come away agreeing with my assessment of his gift.

 Naturally, aged 12, James was snapped up by Luton Town, who then proceeded to coach him in the intricacies of playing ‘full back’ he moved forward into midfield and by 14 they tried him ‘upfront’, the gift was gone.

 James is in his twenties now, and sometimes gets a game for the local side.

 Unless we change the way our children learn their football we will remain a nation of technically inept under achievers.

 A 5 year old comes to football with no concept of  boundaries, touch lines mean nothing to him. If you put him on a football pitch he will see a goal at either end, but will see the complete recreation field as his pitch. A ball is for following wherever it may lead. Like sheep they need a shepherd. If we provide a shepherd / sheepdog to cajole and guide the flock, they will follow and return to the pen in which you wish them to operate.

 Children relate to an idol and will mimic the gifts they admire. We must involve teenagers and young adults in the footballing education of these kids. My 23year old son is forever doing tricks with a ball and is technically superior to anyone of my generation. I was a far better footballer than him and consequently played at a level (however limited) he will never achieve, but, that is all about attitude and application, rather than ability. My son’s technical ability far outweighs my own and he has more fun with a football than I ever had. Put this enthusiasm and sense of fun, coupled with his technical ability, amongst young footballers and you create a new idol, someone to be admired and mimicked.

                     *** Technique is nurtured, not coached** 

When it comes to nurturing this young talent, we need to apply an almost ‘nice cop, nearly as nice cop’ approach. Where, my son would be the ‘nice cop’ doing his tricks and interacting with the kids, while the ‘nearly as nice cop’, (me) passes on words of wisdom, encouraging and consoling. I say consoling, as young children having fun often results in tumbles and tears. ‘Nearly as nice cop’ would pick them up, put an arm around them to comfort them and then encourage them to rejoin the fun.

 ‘Pervert’ I hear you say. Get a life! You hear me say.

 When I attained my coaching badge in 1990, it became my passport to coach kids my way. In amongst them, playing with them. Not barking orders from a sideline, or rearranging cones in pretty formation. Boy did we have some fun!

 When recently, I approached a former club about the possibility of returning to coaching, they welcomed me with open arms.  I was the sort of coach they were crying out for. Someone with a wealth of experience, known and respected within their club. When could I start?

 They explained that I would have to have a C.R.B. check and retake my coaching badges. In the meantime, they would be happy for me to ‘put on sessions’ chaperoned by one of their coaches! I explained my philosophy on coaching and that I would want to ‘play’ with the kids. They said unfortunately, in accordance with health and safety guidelines, this would not be possible as I might bump in to one of the kids or, even, fall on them. I explained that should this happen I would pick them up, put an arm around them and encourage them to rejoin the fun! Pervert! I heard them cry!

 Throughout the 20 minute duration of this interview, on an adjacent training pitch, a group of 8 year olds were lined up whilst their ‘coach’ tossed a ball for

each to head back to him. I wondered if any of them might not come back, next week.

 At some point, in any coaching session, under the present regime you will hear the cry ‘can we have a game, now?’ Up to secondary school age (12) this should never be heard again. All coaching / training should consist of 99% playing the game.

 In life, we learn more from ‘on the job’ experience than any training course could ever teach us. If we enjoy doing something, we will learn from it.

             Kids just want to have fun. Playing football is fun.

 

 

 

Why is this idea important?

Another World Cup failure precedes another inquisition. Amidst the predictable calls for the manager’s head, comes the equally predictable re-emergence of the ‘T’ word (Technique). The ‘T’ word is often prefixed by reference to an English footballer and his lack of it.

 The ‘T’ word is always followed by an investigation into our coaching methods and a rewriting of the coaching manuals.

 Coaching manuals should be stocked on the top shelf, where children can’t reach them.

 The Premier League is often hailed as the most exciting league in the world. It is exciting because it is error strewn and mishap laden. Spectating at a lower level is often as painful as it is hilarious. Under the present coaching regime, the future is ‘more of the same’.

 At present we have a two tier coaching system, whereby children come in to the game as young as 5 and are encouraged to leave their imagination at home. They enter a world of day-glow bibs and cones, under the supervision of someone’s dad with illusions of coaching the most successful under 9 team in history and the ensuing glory that would be reflected upon him. If  the lad comes through this stage of his development and show signs of  ability, he will be snapped up by his local club. Thus commences the second level of coaching, where we subdue any natural ability in a quest for all round team play and spatial awareness!

 I cite the case of James a local lad who first came to my attention aged 6. He came along to one of my indoor football sessions every week for approx 2 years. This was a mixed age group some of the lads were as much as 3 years older than James. Every Saturday morning, whilst I was encouraging this group to just enjoy playing football, James was having most fun of all doing what he loved best, scoring goals! Moving forward a couple of years, James was in the same under 10team as my son. I would go along to support Robbie, every Sunday morning, and would come home with tales of the most natural goal scorer I had seen, at any level (Jimmy Greaves included). I would take along the best goal scorers I had ever played with, to see James score goals, and they would come away agreeing with my assessment of his gift.

 Naturally, aged 12, James was snapped up by Luton Town, who then proceeded to coach him in the intricacies of playing ‘full back’ he moved forward into midfield and by 14 they tried him ‘upfront’, the gift was gone.

 James is in his twenties now, and sometimes gets a game for the local side.

 Unless we change the way our children learn their football we will remain a nation of technically inept under achievers.

 A 5 year old comes to football with no concept of  boundaries, touch lines mean nothing to him. If you put him on a football pitch he will see a goal at either end, but will see the complete recreation field as his pitch. A ball is for following wherever it may lead. Like sheep they need a shepherd. If we provide a shepherd / sheepdog to cajole and guide the flock, they will follow and return to the pen in which you wish them to operate.

 Children relate to an idol and will mimic the gifts they admire. We must involve teenagers and young adults in the footballing education of these kids. My 23year old son is forever doing tricks with a ball and is technically superior to anyone of my generation. I was a far better footballer than him and consequently played at a level (however limited) he will never achieve, but, that is all about attitude and application, rather than ability. My son’s technical ability far outweighs my own and he has more fun with a football than I ever had. Put this enthusiasm and sense of fun, coupled with his technical ability, amongst young footballers and you create a new idol, someone to be admired and mimicked.

                     *** Technique is nurtured, not coached** 

When it comes to nurturing this young talent, we need to apply an almost ‘nice cop, nearly as nice cop’ approach. Where, my son would be the ‘nice cop’ doing his tricks and interacting with the kids, while the ‘nearly as nice cop’, (me) passes on words of wisdom, encouraging and consoling. I say consoling, as young children having fun often results in tumbles and tears. ‘Nearly as nice cop’ would pick them up, put an arm around them to comfort them and then encourage them to rejoin the fun.

 ‘Pervert’ I hear you say. Get a life! You hear me say.

 When I attained my coaching badge in 1990, it became my passport to coach kids my way. In amongst them, playing with them. Not barking orders from a sideline, or rearranging cones in pretty formation. Boy did we have some fun!

 When recently, I approached a former club about the possibility of returning to coaching, they welcomed me with open arms.  I was the sort of coach they were crying out for. Someone with a wealth of experience, known and respected within their club. When could I start?

 They explained that I would have to have a C.R.B. check and retake my coaching badges. In the meantime, they would be happy for me to ‘put on sessions’ chaperoned by one of their coaches! I explained my philosophy on coaching and that I would want to ‘play’ with the kids. They said unfortunately, in accordance with health and safety guidelines, this would not be possible as I might bump in to one of the kids or, even, fall on them. I explained that should this happen I would pick them up, put an arm around them and encourage them to rejoin the fun! Pervert! I heard them cry!

 Throughout the 20 minute duration of this interview, on an adjacent training pitch, a group of 8 year olds were lined up whilst their ‘coach’ tossed a ball for

each to head back to him. I wondered if any of them might not come back, next week.

 At some point, in any coaching session, under the present regime you will hear the cry ‘can we have a game, now?’ Up to secondary school age (12) this should never be heard again. All coaching / training should consist of 99% playing the game.

 In life, we learn more from ‘on the job’ experience than any training course could ever teach us. If we enjoy doing something, we will learn from it.

             Kids just want to have fun. Playing football is fun.

 

 

 

repeal the control of alcohol at sports ground act

Football stadia are now the only "designated" sports grounds where this act applies.

The law is outdated and while relevant when it was introduced, now seems restrictive and unfair to the vast majority of Football fans.

Why is this idea important?

Football stadia are now the only "designated" sports grounds where this act applies.

The law is outdated and while relevant when it was introduced, now seems restrictive and unfair to the vast majority of Football fans.

Trial a suspension of the law that prohibits alcohol consumption within view of the pitch at football grounds

For years the average football fan has been restricted by the draconion law that prevents the consumption of alcohol inside the bowl of the stadium.  Unlike all other events that take place at the same stadiums be it rugby, cricket, musical events etc the consumtion of alcohol within view of the pitch is illegal.

 

This law, which results from the behaviour of football fans in the 70's and 80's is completely outdated in todays modern stadia which are well stewarded and have full cctv.  Most grounds have a family area so it is reasonable that alcohol consumption should be restricted in those areas.

 

The current law simply encourages supporters to quickly drink as much alcohol as they can prior to the game as they know that once the game is on, they will not be allowed to drink.  The anolomy is that a it is perfectly legal for someone to continue to drink on the concourse inside the stadium while the game is in progress as long at it is not within sight of the pitch.  It also means that people often miss the last few minutes and first few minutes either side of half time as they are queueing at the concessionary stands.  Take the empty seating just after half time at Wembley Stadium as an example.  It is surely a nonsense for instance that in hospitality boxes, the curtains have to be drawn at football so the pitch is not in view.

 

Almost every other country allows the consumption of alcohol in the stand and is prepared to treat football supports as a normal part of society rather than excluding them simply on the actions of those from a bygone era.

 

It is time that football supporters were afforded the same rights as attendees of all other sporting and entertainment events and treated as equals.

 

This could be done initially on a temporary, trial basis in order to ascertain any positive or negative affect it has on the crowd, the atmosphere and the event as a whole.
 

Why is this idea important?

For years the average football fan has been restricted by the draconion law that prevents the consumption of alcohol inside the bowl of the stadium.  Unlike all other events that take place at the same stadiums be it rugby, cricket, musical events etc the consumtion of alcohol within view of the pitch is illegal.

 

This law, which results from the behaviour of football fans in the 70's and 80's is completely outdated in todays modern stadia which are well stewarded and have full cctv.  Most grounds have a family area so it is reasonable that alcohol consumption should be restricted in those areas.

 

The current law simply encourages supporters to quickly drink as much alcohol as they can prior to the game as they know that once the game is on, they will not be allowed to drink.  The anolomy is that a it is perfectly legal for someone to continue to drink on the concourse inside the stadium while the game is in progress as long at it is not within sight of the pitch.  It also means that people often miss the last few minutes and first few minutes either side of half time as they are queueing at the concessionary stands.  Take the empty seating just after half time at Wembley Stadium as an example.  It is surely a nonsense for instance that in hospitality boxes, the curtains have to be drawn at football so the pitch is not in view.

 

Almost every other country allows the consumption of alcohol in the stand and is prepared to treat football supports as a normal part of society rather than excluding them simply on the actions of those from a bygone era.

 

It is time that football supporters were afforded the same rights as attendees of all other sporting and entertainment events and treated as equals.

 

This could be done initially on a temporary, trial basis in order to ascertain any positive or negative affect it has on the crowd, the atmosphere and the event as a whole.
 

Safe Standing at football grounds

It is time that British football came out of the dungeons with regards to how match-going football supporters are treated.

Safe Standing areas should be introduced to stadia, as it is supported by 9 out 10 fans. It does not mean that fans will be forced to stand, but give all supporters the choice to either sit (in designated seating areas) or stand (in designated standing areas).

It is not a return to terracing – with the appropriate ticket controls and safety bars along each row of supporters there is no chance of anything close to another Hillsborough disaster.

This technology and acknowledgment of the important for supporters to have a choice of sitting or standing has been implements successfully in Germany and has been running very well for a number of years in many grounds.

 

http://www.fsf.org.uk/news/Safe-standing-on-the-up-in-Germany.php

Why is this idea important?

It is time that British football came out of the dungeons with regards to how match-going football supporters are treated.

Safe Standing areas should be introduced to stadia, as it is supported by 9 out 10 fans. It does not mean that fans will be forced to stand, but give all supporters the choice to either sit (in designated seating areas) or stand (in designated standing areas).

It is not a return to terracing – with the appropriate ticket controls and safety bars along each row of supporters there is no chance of anything close to another Hillsborough disaster.

This technology and acknowledgment of the important for supporters to have a choice of sitting or standing has been implements successfully in Germany and has been running very well for a number of years in many grounds.

 

http://www.fsf.org.uk/news/Safe-standing-on-the-up-in-Germany.php

Change CRB Regulations Slightly

Allow a single CRB check to apply to several organisations.

At the moment if you are involved with a club or activity involving children you have to apply for a CRB check for each organisation. If you help at (say) Scouts or Guides and are also helping at a kids football, rugby or swimming club you need a separate CRB check for each organisation – even though the information checked is the same and the activities (in the context of contact with children) are similar.

If you had a named list of common organisation types (say – Scouting, Registered Sports Clubs, Schools, Theatres etc) you could have a single CRB check which would be valid for similar activities in all of them. This would save a huge amount of time and money – for the taxpayer, the individual, and the organisations involved.

 

Those organisations or activities that don't fit into these categories could continue with CRB as it is now.

Why is this idea important?

Allow a single CRB check to apply to several organisations.

At the moment if you are involved with a club or activity involving children you have to apply for a CRB check for each organisation. If you help at (say) Scouts or Guides and are also helping at a kids football, rugby or swimming club you need a separate CRB check for each organisation – even though the information checked is the same and the activities (in the context of contact with children) are similar.

If you had a named list of common organisation types (say – Scouting, Registered Sports Clubs, Schools, Theatres etc) you could have a single CRB check which would be valid for similar activities in all of them. This would save a huge amount of time and money – for the taxpayer, the individual, and the organisations involved.

 

Those organisations or activities that don't fit into these categories could continue with CRB as it is now.

Safe Standing at football matches

I believe that power should be put in the hands of clubs so that they can decide whether small safe standing like that modelled on the German model. If clubs don't want to have the option, they can remain all seater but I believe modern engineering should allow for small safe standing areas. This was in the lib dem manifesto and the tories looked at the issue. I hope you will consider this issue, which would be welcomed by a great many people.

Why is this idea important?

I believe that power should be put in the hands of clubs so that they can decide whether small safe standing like that modelled on the German model. If clubs don't want to have the option, they can remain all seater but I believe modern engineering should allow for small safe standing areas. This was in the lib dem manifesto and the tories looked at the issue. I hope you will consider this issue, which would be welcomed by a great many people.

scrap ban on all seater football stadia

I feel the law on banning standing in football stadia should be scrapped, and the alternative safe standing terraces which are used widley in europe can then be introcuced.

Why is this idea important?

I feel the law on banning standing in football stadia should be scrapped, and the alternative safe standing terraces which are used widley in europe can then be introcuced.