prisoners paying back the country

Send life time prisoners out to serve their country, put them in the army.Make them serve their sentance by fighting for the country they live in.Make short term prisoners clean the streets, help the community, clean graffittit ect.

Why is this idea important?

Send life time prisoners out to serve their country, put them in the army.Make them serve their sentance by fighting for the country they live in.Make short term prisoners clean the streets, help the community, clean graffittit ect.

Use offenders on Community Service to increase recylcing levels and ensure that real work is done.

At my local recycling centre the majority of stuff brought in seems still to go to landfill because it is mixed (e.g. plastic and metal). In the third world recycling rates often approach 90% because of rubbish pickers who break just about everything into usable constituent parts. Clearly, with staff on at least minimum wage, it is not in the interest of most of the waste handling companies to, for example, separate the metal from the wood on an old trouser press I found in my loft – which went to landfill. But someone on  community service could have separateed the wood and the metal. Further, there has been a great deal of complaint about people on CS (community payback etc.) not actually doing anything. Rather than measuring hours of elapsed time which may or may not represent any real work, offenders could be sentenced to recover a certain weight, volume or value of material from items that would otherwise go to landfill. This would result in a fairer punishment (if you do no work, your "sentence" doesn't go down) , no loss of jobs at recycling sentence and a considerable reduction in materials going to landfill. With a nationwide scheme all kinds of materials could be collected that are currently not always used e.g. rag, type 5 plastic etc.

Why is this idea important?

At my local recycling centre the majority of stuff brought in seems still to go to landfill because it is mixed (e.g. plastic and metal). In the third world recycling rates often approach 90% because of rubbish pickers who break just about everything into usable constituent parts. Clearly, with staff on at least minimum wage, it is not in the interest of most of the waste handling companies to, for example, separate the metal from the wood on an old trouser press I found in my loft – which went to landfill. But someone on  community service could have separateed the wood and the metal. Further, there has been a great deal of complaint about people on CS (community payback etc.) not actually doing anything. Rather than measuring hours of elapsed time which may or may not represent any real work, offenders could be sentenced to recover a certain weight, volume or value of material from items that would otherwise go to landfill. This would result in a fairer punishment (if you do no work, your "sentence" doesn't go down) , no loss of jobs at recycling sentence and a considerable reduction in materials going to landfill. With a nationwide scheme all kinds of materials could be collected that are currently not always used e.g. rag, type 5 plastic etc.

BAN SMOKING IN PRISONS

Smoking should be totally banned in all prisons – if you are convicted of an offence you shouldn't have the privelege of being able to smoke inside. A similar policy has led to a substantial cut in crime on the Isle of Man as word got around of teh new restrictions.

Why is this idea important?

Smoking should be totally banned in all prisons – if you are convicted of an offence you shouldn't have the privelege of being able to smoke inside. A similar policy has led to a substantial cut in crime on the Isle of Man as word got around of teh new restrictions.

End Double Punishment and Allow Rehabilitation of ex- offenders

Research clearly shows that after 5 years, criminal history has little or no value in determining a persons likelihood of re-offending. Criminal records should be sealed completely after 5 years and it should be illegal to use or disclose any other persons' criminal record older than 5 years.

Why is this idea important?

Research clearly shows that after 5 years, criminal history has little or no value in determining a persons likelihood of re-offending. Criminal records should be sealed completely after 5 years and it should be illegal to use or disclose any other persons' criminal record older than 5 years.

Increase gaol (jail) sentences to reflect increased life expectency.

Minimum and maximum sentences for most crimes were set based upon a much shorter life expectency. As a result the percentage of life a criminal spent behind bars for a crime commited now compared to the time spent behind bars when the legislation was created is much shorter.

The impact of this is that gaol sentences are less of a deterent than they were. 

Fo example a person given a 20 year sentence in the past at age 30 may not have expected to get out of gaol. However, a person of equal age given a 20 year sentence now would come out as a fit and kicking 50 year old ( assuming the sentence was actually enforced in full).

I would expect to see all gaol sentences reviewed and the maximum penalty potentially doubled.

Why is this idea important?

Minimum and maximum sentences for most crimes were set based upon a much shorter life expectency. As a result the percentage of life a criminal spent behind bars for a crime commited now compared to the time spent behind bars when the legislation was created is much shorter.

The impact of this is that gaol sentences are less of a deterent than they were. 

Fo example a person given a 20 year sentence in the past at age 30 may not have expected to get out of gaol. However, a person of equal age given a 20 year sentence now would come out as a fit and kicking 50 year old ( assuming the sentence was actually enforced in full).

I would expect to see all gaol sentences reviewed and the maximum penalty potentially doubled.

removing trivial, old offences from enhanced disclosure

remove trivial, old offences-say more than 5 years old from criminal records. Use technology to keep the fingerprints and DNA- but 'hide' the identity details so that lives are not blighted by trivial offences that are more than 5 years old- so long as they were not for serious offences such as sexual, murder etc. There should be a clean sheet- even countries like the USA should not be able to get the information after 5 years for trivial offences. The UK should learn to stick up for itself and its Citizens- if the Government are cowardly and timid, what hope is there for the country? 

 I have seen many people who are unable to get work because so many jobs even where there is no danger to anyone because of someone's old, spent and minor offences -have to be disclosed.  for example a young 23 year old man used his boss' garage to do private work for customers on their cars -he was taken to court for theft and could not find any other work in a garage because he had to disclose the offence- he could not travel abroad. He ended up committing more offences because he could not get work- a waste of tax payers money and his life

Why is this idea important?

remove trivial, old offences-say more than 5 years old from criminal records. Use technology to keep the fingerprints and DNA- but 'hide' the identity details so that lives are not blighted by trivial offences that are more than 5 years old- so long as they were not for serious offences such as sexual, murder etc. There should be a clean sheet- even countries like the USA should not be able to get the information after 5 years for trivial offences. The UK should learn to stick up for itself and its Citizens- if the Government are cowardly and timid, what hope is there for the country? 

 I have seen many people who are unable to get work because so many jobs even where there is no danger to anyone because of someone's old, spent and minor offences -have to be disclosed.  for example a young 23 year old man used his boss' garage to do private work for customers on their cars -he was taken to court for theft and could not find any other work in a garage because he had to disclose the offence- he could not travel abroad. He ended up committing more offences because he could not get work- a waste of tax payers money and his life

Reform of the Mental Health Laws

To provide better protection for those who have been diagnosed with a Mental Health Illness and have committed an offence. By protection I mean treatment, care and civil liberties.

Service Users (Patients) who have committed offences and are detained under the Mental Health Act need to be dealt with fairer. The existing system is the Asylum system in disguise. There is no clear understanding as to whether people are detained by a penal system or a medical treatment system. Very often both are applied. Many patients are held in secure units for long periods of time when they are well. Care in the community hasnt been fully achieved and Doctors and medical teams have enormous powers over patients whilst they are under section.

Other aspects of Mental Health Law need to be addressed such as the power of recall for non-compliant patients. On top of the huge costs for running secure hospitals there are further administrative costs incurred for Tribunals, managers meetings and legal aid.

The public need to be educated further about mental illness.  

Why is this idea important?

To provide better protection for those who have been diagnosed with a Mental Health Illness and have committed an offence. By protection I mean treatment, care and civil liberties.

Service Users (Patients) who have committed offences and are detained under the Mental Health Act need to be dealt with fairer. The existing system is the Asylum system in disguise. There is no clear understanding as to whether people are detained by a penal system or a medical treatment system. Very often both are applied. Many patients are held in secure units for long periods of time when they are well. Care in the community hasnt been fully achieved and Doctors and medical teams have enormous powers over patients whilst they are under section.

Other aspects of Mental Health Law need to be addressed such as the power of recall for non-compliant patients. On top of the huge costs for running secure hospitals there are further administrative costs incurred for Tribunals, managers meetings and legal aid.

The public need to be educated further about mental illness.  

Fiscal penalties (cash fines) for minor crimes.

We are always hearing that there are too many people in prison and young offenders’ places.  We also hear that whilst one person might receive a fine for a crime, someone else gets a custodial sentence for the same offence, whilst another person is also found guilty somewhere else in the country for the same or very similar crime but gets away with a telling off.  I believe, the general public are frustrated by the inconsistency of the courts and the length of time the whole process takes to bring someone to court.

Many crimes such as speeding, going through a red light, and other traffic / road related offences can be dealt with by a fine being imposed but often this isn’t a deterrent as it’s always the same amount.

I was once caught speeding in a 30 mph zone.  Instead of having points added to my licence, I attended a driver training day, which cost me £100.  This was the first offence I had ever committed.  However, I found that most of the other people there had already collected 6 or 9 points on their driving licence and often for repeated offences such as speeding.  The course certainly improved my awareness of driving and I believe made me a better driver.

However, there are many “minor” offences, which on their own are very unlikely to result in someone being sent to prison, not only for bad driving but also shop-lifting, theft, vandalism, etc.  If all of the minor offences were organised into groups and set out on a sliding scale of how serious they are, then a fiscal penalty (cash fine) could be more easily imposed by the Police, at the point of being stopped / caught / arrested.  Furthermore, to act as an ongoing deterrent; the fine issued should double in value each time

We could start with a minimum fine of £125 for the most minor offence such as dropping litter, £250 for the next level and so on, doubling the amount for each level.  Then if someone commits a second offence at the same level or higher, the criminal database would automatically double their fine.  This means that if a person goes about committing a series of minor offences, over a period of time (with a rolling ten year period used), they could end up paying £1000 for a third offence, then £2000 for a 4thand £4000 for their 5thminor offence. 

At some point, a person who is caught speeding in their car, driving through a red light or using their mobile phone whilst driving, is going to realise that having to pay double each time due to their previous actions and fine, will eventually deter them from how they go about their day-to-day life.

I believe a fiscal penalty system would also free-up the Police and courts to deal with more serious offences, so that prison can be the place for any non-minor offence.

Why is this idea important?

We are always hearing that there are too many people in prison and young offenders’ places.  We also hear that whilst one person might receive a fine for a crime, someone else gets a custodial sentence for the same offence, whilst another person is also found guilty somewhere else in the country for the same or very similar crime but gets away with a telling off.  I believe, the general public are frustrated by the inconsistency of the courts and the length of time the whole process takes to bring someone to court.

Many crimes such as speeding, going through a red light, and other traffic / road related offences can be dealt with by a fine being imposed but often this isn’t a deterrent as it’s always the same amount.

I was once caught speeding in a 30 mph zone.  Instead of having points added to my licence, I attended a driver training day, which cost me £100.  This was the first offence I had ever committed.  However, I found that most of the other people there had already collected 6 or 9 points on their driving licence and often for repeated offences such as speeding.  The course certainly improved my awareness of driving and I believe made me a better driver.

However, there are many “minor” offences, which on their own are very unlikely to result in someone being sent to prison, not only for bad driving but also shop-lifting, theft, vandalism, etc.  If all of the minor offences were organised into groups and set out on a sliding scale of how serious they are, then a fiscal penalty (cash fine) could be more easily imposed by the Police, at the point of being stopped / caught / arrested.  Furthermore, to act as an ongoing deterrent; the fine issued should double in value each time

We could start with a minimum fine of £125 for the most minor offence such as dropping litter, £250 for the next level and so on, doubling the amount for each level.  Then if someone commits a second offence at the same level or higher, the criminal database would automatically double their fine.  This means that if a person goes about committing a series of minor offences, over a period of time (with a rolling ten year period used), they could end up paying £1000 for a third offence, then £2000 for a 4thand £4000 for their 5thminor offence. 

At some point, a person who is caught speeding in their car, driving through a red light or using their mobile phone whilst driving, is going to realise that having to pay double each time due to their previous actions and fine, will eventually deter them from how they go about their day-to-day life.

I believe a fiscal penalty system would also free-up the Police and courts to deal with more serious offences, so that prison can be the place for any non-minor offence.

Introduce Gene Therapy as a way of dealing with crime.

When the DNA samples of the prison population were compared with that of the general population, it was found that there were 3 genes which were dramatically more populous in the prisons. Upon further analysis these genes were found to each do one of the following: greatly increase the possibility of developing schizophrenia, make it much more likely to develop an addiction, and to make physical violence an automatic reaction (the so-called 'warrior gene'). It seems that, in the same way that a dyslexic has the part of the brain that affects letter order in an under-developed state, these people are also genetically impaired so that they have a different kind of learning disability, one which almost forces them into serious crime since their brains are unable to determine the right course of action or they are unable to do the right thing even if they want to. By replacing these genes with the normal gene that everyone else has, crime would more than halve.

Why is this idea important?

When the DNA samples of the prison population were compared with that of the general population, it was found that there were 3 genes which were dramatically more populous in the prisons. Upon further analysis these genes were found to each do one of the following: greatly increase the possibility of developing schizophrenia, make it much more likely to develop an addiction, and to make physical violence an automatic reaction (the so-called 'warrior gene'). It seems that, in the same way that a dyslexic has the part of the brain that affects letter order in an under-developed state, these people are also genetically impaired so that they have a different kind of learning disability, one which almost forces them into serious crime since their brains are unable to determine the right course of action or they are unable to do the right thing even if they want to. By replacing these genes with the normal gene that everyone else has, crime would more than halve.

All Prisoners must be enrolled on to Unpaid Public Service Work Programmes.

It is a disgrace that it costs £30,000-£40,000 per anum to house a prisoner to spend 24 hours of the day laying idle in their cell.

Why can't these criminals who have cost society, not be used as a free human resource to work on some of the labour intensive public work projects – in order to pay society back.

Such suggestions could be digging trenches so underground cable connection can reach our rural parts of the country? Who BT simply cannot afford to cater due to the huge cost (mainly labour costs) – and the small revenues it'd generate. 

Why can't prisoners be the ones who clean our dirty streets, our public places.

I am not suggesting our prison population to undergo tortuous third world conditions and treatment. However, I cannot accept that we the public should be expected to tolerate that a prisoner's life is allowed to stay dormant in cells, then catapulted back in to society once their sentence has finished. The money spent on housing a prisoner is horrendously more than what is spent on the average pensioner's state pension.

I can understand the practicalities of trying to harness prisoners as a cheap human resource are difficult. There is an increased risk of escape, which increases the public's risk, however, surely technologies can be developed to monitor groups of working out-of-prison prisoners. 

It just seems to me that the government has not had the bottle in the past to test the waters on this issue, which I can imagine is a minefield of human right's red tape, but I do feel that the government has not ever simply sat down and looked through the figures – this could save the country a lot of money.

And justly so.

Why is this idea important?

It is a disgrace that it costs £30,000-£40,000 per anum to house a prisoner to spend 24 hours of the day laying idle in their cell.

Why can't these criminals who have cost society, not be used as a free human resource to work on some of the labour intensive public work projects – in order to pay society back.

Such suggestions could be digging trenches so underground cable connection can reach our rural parts of the country? Who BT simply cannot afford to cater due to the huge cost (mainly labour costs) – and the small revenues it'd generate. 

Why can't prisoners be the ones who clean our dirty streets, our public places.

I am not suggesting our prison population to undergo tortuous third world conditions and treatment. However, I cannot accept that we the public should be expected to tolerate that a prisoner's life is allowed to stay dormant in cells, then catapulted back in to society once their sentence has finished. The money spent on housing a prisoner is horrendously more than what is spent on the average pensioner's state pension.

I can understand the practicalities of trying to harness prisoners as a cheap human resource are difficult. There is an increased risk of escape, which increases the public's risk, however, surely technologies can be developed to monitor groups of working out-of-prison prisoners. 

It just seems to me that the government has not had the bottle in the past to test the waters on this issue, which I can imagine is a minefield of human right's red tape, but I do feel that the government has not ever simply sat down and looked through the figures – this could save the country a lot of money.

And justly so.