Repeal Harris vs DPP (1993) and allow the carry of locking, folding penknives without a specific reason

Since 1993 it has been illegal to carry a safe locking, folding penknife due to a highly unjust piece of case law. This causes confusion amongst the general public and prevents ordinary, law-abiding people from carrying a safe, everyday tool. I would repeal Harris vs DPP 1993 and amend section 139 of the Criminal Justice Act (1988) to specifically allow both locking and non-locking folding penknives with a blade that has a cutting edge not exceeding 3-inches in length.

Why is this idea important?

Since 1993 it has been illegal to carry a safe locking, folding penknife due to a highly unjust piece of case law. This causes confusion amongst the general public and prevents ordinary, law-abiding people from carrying a safe, everyday tool. I would repeal Harris vs DPP 1993 and amend section 139 of the Criminal Justice Act (1988) to specifically allow both locking and non-locking folding penknives with a blade that has a cutting edge not exceeding 3-inches in length.

Put Lock Knives on the Same Standing as Folding Knives

The current situation where a penknife with a locking blade is illegal whereas a folding knife isn't is ludicrous.  Folding penknives are dangerous and result in far too many injuries.  THe law should be changes to allow a person to also carry a penknife with a locking blade of no more than 3 inches, the same requirement as the folding penknife.

The current law criminalises innocent people like myself who garden, fish and do woodcraft activities with their sons who have routinely carried a locking penknife since their early teens, in my case for over 30 years.

I doubt the restriction has made a single knife-wielding thug change their weapon of choice to a folding knife with a blade under 3 inches.

Why is this idea important?

The current situation where a penknife with a locking blade is illegal whereas a folding knife isn't is ludicrous.  Folding penknives are dangerous and result in far too many injuries.  THe law should be changes to allow a person to also carry a penknife with a locking blade of no more than 3 inches, the same requirement as the folding penknife.

The current law criminalises innocent people like myself who garden, fish and do woodcraft activities with their sons who have routinely carried a locking penknife since their early teens, in my case for over 30 years.

I doubt the restriction has made a single knife-wielding thug change their weapon of choice to a folding knife with a blade under 3 inches.

Repeal case law and allow the everyday carry of sub 3-inch locking folding penknives

Allow the everyday carry of sub 3-inch locking folding penknives, as per s139 of the Criminal Justice Act, 1988. Repeal the nonsensical and confusing case law (Harris v DPP [1993]) that bans the carry of a safe hand tool.

Why is this idea important?

Allow the everyday carry of sub 3-inch locking folding penknives, as per s139 of the Criminal Justice Act, 1988. Repeal the nonsensical and confusing case law (Harris v DPP [1993]) that bans the carry of a safe hand tool.

Prevention of Crime Act 1988 Section 139 change ‘good reason’, to ‘reasonable excuse’ and explicitly allow lock knives

It is, in my view, wrong that, while a 2.5 inch folding penknife is legal, it is illegal if the knife has a safety lock.  Parliament explicitly wrote this law to allow people to carry folding knives of a particular length.  However they(you) did not explicitly consider folding knives with a safety lock and this was left up to judicial interpretation.  

The interpretation given was that folding knives with a safety lock were indistinguishable from fixed blade knives.  Take another look.

 

Why is this idea important?

It is, in my view, wrong that, while a 2.5 inch folding penknife is legal, it is illegal if the knife has a safety lock.  Parliament explicitly wrote this law to allow people to carry folding knives of a particular length.  However they(you) did not explicitly consider folding knives with a safety lock and this was left up to judicial interpretation.  

The interpretation given was that folding knives with a safety lock were indistinguishable from fixed blade knives.  Take another look.