Control Orders

Given the recent decision over the death of Ian Tomlinson, and others in the recent past, it seems this country is in danger of becoming a police state. Where we have the opportunity to rein in the powers of the police (and associated authorities) and ensure their accountability to the British public and to the law they are sworn to uphold, we should take it.  A small example. The police have been given clear guidelines on people's right to take photographs in public places, yet they continue to ignore these instructions by stopping and harrassing photographers, ostensibly under Sections 43 & 44 of the Terrorism Bill. The police, it seems, are becoming a law unto themselves.

Why is this idea important?

Given the recent decision over the death of Ian Tomlinson, and others in the recent past, it seems this country is in danger of becoming a police state. Where we have the opportunity to rein in the powers of the police (and associated authorities) and ensure their accountability to the British public and to the law they are sworn to uphold, we should take it.  A small example. The police have been given clear guidelines on people's right to take photographs in public places, yet they continue to ignore these instructions by stopping and harrassing photographers, ostensibly under Sections 43 & 44 of the Terrorism Bill. The police, it seems, are becoming a law unto themselves.

Legalise all drugs or, at the very least, cannabis.

I believe, for the reasons set out below, that all drugs should be freely available to those who want them, even drugs such as heroin and crystal meth which are capable of causing immense damage to the user. However, I am willing to accept that not only is the legalisation of such drugs well nigh impossible under the current political climate, but that there are numerous valid arguments against such a step. However, there is one drug which these arguments simply do not apply to: cannabis.

Let us compare cannabis to alcohol. This comparison is a cliche I know, but one worth repeating because it seems to have made no impression even on many of those who accept it as such. Alcohol is highly addictive, causes long term and short term liver damage and is very easy to overdose on. Cannabis, by contrast, is not physically addictive (of course it can be psychologically addictive, but so can chocolate fingers and football) and it is literally impossible to overdose on as the lethal dose is so high. Of course it can, in large quantities over a number of years, cause lung cancer and paranoia, and worsen psychosis in those predisposed to it.

However, lest we consider that legalisation would cause a sudden upsurge in use, bringing a wave of paranoid cancerous psychotics in its wake, let us not forget that cannabis use is lower among the Dutch than among the British or Americans. This is because cannabis is a highly cultural drug – that is to say, a substantial proportion of young adults, of which I am one, choose to use it, and a substantial proportion choose not to. This is, as I say, a matter of choice. You would be hard pressed to find any young adult in the UK, apart from those living in remote areas, who wishes to use cannabis and is unable to. If you want cannabis in the UK, you can get it, and it has ever been thus.

All of the above may go some way towards persuading those of a 'nannying' bent that not only are we the People safe to be let loose with cannabis, we are also able to get hold of it anyway so all legalisation would do is cut off a source of funding for criminals. Now, however, we must consider the more important and generalised importance of drug legalisation, for as they stand, the drug laws are contemptuous of the individual's right to choose what she may do, harmful or no, to her own body.

Why is this idea important?

I believe, for the reasons set out below, that all drugs should be freely available to those who want them, even drugs such as heroin and crystal meth which are capable of causing immense damage to the user. However, I am willing to accept that not only is the legalisation of such drugs well nigh impossible under the current political climate, but that there are numerous valid arguments against such a step. However, there is one drug which these arguments simply do not apply to: cannabis.

Let us compare cannabis to alcohol. This comparison is a cliche I know, but one worth repeating because it seems to have made no impression even on many of those who accept it as such. Alcohol is highly addictive, causes long term and short term liver damage and is very easy to overdose on. Cannabis, by contrast, is not physically addictive (of course it can be psychologically addictive, but so can chocolate fingers and football) and it is literally impossible to overdose on as the lethal dose is so high. Of course it can, in large quantities over a number of years, cause lung cancer and paranoia, and worsen psychosis in those predisposed to it.

However, lest we consider that legalisation would cause a sudden upsurge in use, bringing a wave of paranoid cancerous psychotics in its wake, let us not forget that cannabis use is lower among the Dutch than among the British or Americans. This is because cannabis is a highly cultural drug – that is to say, a substantial proportion of young adults, of which I am one, choose to use it, and a substantial proportion choose not to. This is, as I say, a matter of choice. You would be hard pressed to find any young adult in the UK, apart from those living in remote areas, who wishes to use cannabis and is unable to. If you want cannabis in the UK, you can get it, and it has ever been thus.

All of the above may go some way towards persuading those of a 'nannying' bent that not only are we the People safe to be let loose with cannabis, we are also able to get hold of it anyway so all legalisation would do is cut off a source of funding for criminals. Now, however, we must consider the more important and generalised importance of drug legalisation, for as they stand, the drug laws are contemptuous of the individual's right to choose what she may do, harmful or no, to her own body.

A legalisation of ALL narcotic substances taken for personal use

A legalisation of all consumable substances taken for personal use, the establishment of regulation and taxation to this substances. The establishment of an agency to educate the general public of guidelines, dangers and ramifications of taking these substances. A large portion of taxation profits to be fed directly into rehabilitation and education programs.

Why is this idea important?

A legalisation of all consumable substances taken for personal use, the establishment of regulation and taxation to this substances. The establishment of an agency to educate the general public of guidelines, dangers and ramifications of taking these substances. A large portion of taxation profits to be fed directly into rehabilitation and education programs.

False accusations, which are unfounded, against teachers should be deleted and have a limited shelf life

Legislation that allows reports on false accusations, of teachers, that are classed as unfounded to be allowed to be kept until the teacher is 65 and needs to be stated during new job application by references infringe the rights of innocent teachers and should be removed, or ammended to state that such reports are deleted after 6 months – 1 year.

Why is this idea important?

Legislation that allows reports on false accusations, of teachers, that are classed as unfounded to be allowed to be kept until the teacher is 65 and needs to be stated during new job application by references infringe the rights of innocent teachers and should be removed, or ammended to state that such reports are deleted after 6 months – 1 year.

Liberty in Education

 We should demand Liberty in Education through the affirmation of the rights of parents to decide and choose and the legalisation of a wide variety of options:

Homeschooling, private schools, charter schools, online schools, community schools, Foundation schools, private tutoring….

And an education tax credit to place private (whether profit or non-profit) options on a level playing field with state-run schools.

 

Why is this idea important?

 We should demand Liberty in Education through the affirmation of the rights of parents to decide and choose and the legalisation of a wide variety of options:

Homeschooling, private schools, charter schools, online schools, community schools, Foundation schools, private tutoring….

And an education tax credit to place private (whether profit or non-profit) options on a level playing field with state-run schools.

 

An Englishman’s home is his castle

Reinforce explicitly and clearly  the prohibition on ALL agents of government from entering private property by force without a proper  warrant.

 

Reinforce and make clear the right of every citizen to defend his home from unlawfull intrusion, specially if carried out by authorities.

Why is this idea important?

Reinforce explicitly and clearly  the prohibition on ALL agents of government from entering private property by force without a proper  warrant.

 

Reinforce and make clear the right of every citizen to defend his home from unlawfull intrusion, specially if carried out by authorities.

“Causing offence” should not be illegal.

If somebody is offended by what I say, that's their problem! They shouldn't be allowed to veto anything I say by simply claiming to be offended by it. I'm not responsible for their peculiar sensitivities – I want my freedom of speech back!

Why is this idea important?

If somebody is offended by what I say, that's their problem! They shouldn't be allowed to veto anything I say by simply claiming to be offended by it. I'm not responsible for their peculiar sensitivities – I want my freedom of speech back!