Reverse the decision that all new nurses will be required to have degrees

The basic requirement for being a good nurse is surely to have a kind, caring personality, not an ability to write a good essay.  It is therefore hugely worrying that entirely uncaring, but academic people could soon qualify as nurses at the expense of those who are very caring and attentive, but do not have an aptitude for academic study. 

What is more, there is a very real possibility that some of those who get degrees will become ‘too posh to wash’ and think the traditional duties of a nurse below them.  This will do nobody any favours. 

On top of this, has any thought been given to how this ludicrous proposal will be funded?  There are surely only three possibilities, all of which are unpalatable:

  1. The government will fund this unnecessary extra education, through grants and subsidies, increasing the already gargantuan budget deficit, thus further exacerbating the economic woes of this country.  
  2. Nursing will become a career option which is only available to the wealthy, as they will be the only ones who can afford the training.
  3. Trainee nurses will be required to take out large loans, saddling them with huge debts that they may never pay off.

Clearly none of the above, or any combination of them, is in the slightest bit desirable from the point of view either of potential nurses or of society as a whole.

Why is this idea important?

The basic requirement for being a good nurse is surely to have a kind, caring personality, not an ability to write a good essay.  It is therefore hugely worrying that entirely uncaring, but academic people could soon qualify as nurses at the expense of those who are very caring and attentive, but do not have an aptitude for academic study. 

What is more, there is a very real possibility that some of those who get degrees will become ‘too posh to wash’ and think the traditional duties of a nurse below them.  This will do nobody any favours. 

On top of this, has any thought been given to how this ludicrous proposal will be funded?  There are surely only three possibilities, all of which are unpalatable:

  1. The government will fund this unnecessary extra education, through grants and subsidies, increasing the already gargantuan budget deficit, thus further exacerbating the economic woes of this country.  
  2. Nursing will become a career option which is only available to the wealthy, as they will be the only ones who can afford the training.
  3. Trainee nurses will be required to take out large loans, saddling them with huge debts that they may never pay off.

Clearly none of the above, or any combination of them, is in the slightest bit desirable from the point of view either of potential nurses or of society as a whole.

Reduce top-down regulations at universities

British Academics are among the most regulated in the western world. The government is talking about reducing top-down control and let professionals get on with their work.

How about applying this to universities? The RAE/REF, TQA and QAA require excessive amounts of academic time – actually taking away considerable time and resources from teaching, student contact and research. There are also plenty of unintended consequences which haven't done the sector any good – e.g. the artifically distorted hiring cycles caused by the RAE/REF, artificial, over-complicated administrative procedures introduced to satisfy the QAA, endless monitoring routines which make teachers more timid and teaching less innovative due to the TQA.
Last but not least, there is also a considerable cost to these exercises, both within institutions and nationwide.

Cut the red tape and let academics get on with their work, which ought to be research and teaching – not endless admin.

Why is this idea important?

British Academics are among the most regulated in the western world. The government is talking about reducing top-down control and let professionals get on with their work.

How about applying this to universities? The RAE/REF, TQA and QAA require excessive amounts of academic time – actually taking away considerable time and resources from teaching, student contact and research. There are also plenty of unintended consequences which haven't done the sector any good – e.g. the artifically distorted hiring cycles caused by the RAE/REF, artificial, over-complicated administrative procedures introduced to satisfy the QAA, endless monitoring routines which make teachers more timid and teaching less innovative due to the TQA.
Last but not least, there is also a considerable cost to these exercises, both within institutions and nationwide.

Cut the red tape and let academics get on with their work, which ought to be research and teaching – not endless admin.