Clarify whether English Common Law is superior the EU’s Napoleonic Code

Under English Common Law, the role of the state is simply reduced to being able to tell you what you cannot do – murder, rape, theft, assault and so on.

Under the Napoleonic Code, the role of the state is entirely different: it tells you what you can do and everything else is forbidden.

As I understand it, the passing of the Lisbon Treaty means the the Napoleonic Code is therefore in force in the United Kingdom.

Why is this idea important?

Under English Common Law, the role of the state is simply reduced to being able to tell you what you cannot do – murder, rape, theft, assault and so on.

Under the Napoleonic Code, the role of the state is entirely different: it tells you what you can do and everything else is forbidden.

As I understand it, the passing of the Lisbon Treaty means the the Napoleonic Code is therefore in force in the United Kingdom.

Leave the EU – that should stop most of the daft, expensive legislation

Leaving the EU should stop most of the daft, expensive legislation which this site was set up to do. Most of the ideas proposed on this site would be impossible to repeal because the are binding on our government. Euro diktat has precedence over UK law in many cases.

Most of our legislation is now directed from Brussels. The government you elect here in the UK can rarely do anything about laws, regulations and bureacracy from the EU. Most of these things have been created after lobbying by special interest groups or big business. They have the deep pockets to employ specialist PR agents who – at best – wine and dine the EU bureacrats.

Even where the legislations sounds to be positive, it is usually at enormous cost.

Every year, thousands of new rules and regulations are published producing a monumental nuisance for almost every organisation in the country.

Some we know are EU-inspired, but other laws are less well known as EU in origin. In fact most of our legislation comes from over the water.  But the majority of EU laws and regulations are expensive to implement and monitor, and ineffective in not producing the intended effect; some are harmful, and of course some actually useful.

Why is this idea important?

Leaving the EU should stop most of the daft, expensive legislation which this site was set up to do. Most of the ideas proposed on this site would be impossible to repeal because the are binding on our government. Euro diktat has precedence over UK law in many cases.

Most of our legislation is now directed from Brussels. The government you elect here in the UK can rarely do anything about laws, regulations and bureacracy from the EU. Most of these things have been created after lobbying by special interest groups or big business. They have the deep pockets to employ specialist PR agents who – at best – wine and dine the EU bureacrats.

Even where the legislations sounds to be positive, it is usually at enormous cost.

Every year, thousands of new rules and regulations are published producing a monumental nuisance for almost every organisation in the country.

Some we know are EU-inspired, but other laws are less well known as EU in origin. In fact most of our legislation comes from over the water.  But the majority of EU laws and regulations are expensive to implement and monitor, and ineffective in not producing the intended effect; some are harmful, and of course some actually useful.

Referendum on UK EU membership

The present coalition government, whatever it thinks it has or has not promised, should hold a referendum on the UK's membership of the EU.

If the government wishes, it could even say it does not promise to abide by the result – just so long as the British people can actually express their views.

Why is this idea important?

The present coalition government, whatever it thinks it has or has not promised, should hold a referendum on the UK's membership of the EU.

If the government wishes, it could even say it does not promise to abide by the result – just so long as the British people can actually express their views.