Remove requirement for top level football grounds to be all-seated

Section 11.1 of the Football Spectators Act provides the Secretary of State with the power to stipulate that certain football grounds are all-seated, a power that is currently applied to the top two divisions. This section should be repealed.

Practical experience shows that the all-seater rules are unenforceable. Every week, thousands of people stand in front of their seats for the duration of the game. Many who would like to sit down are unable to use their seats, as they find their view blocked. Varied and repeated attempts to tackle this practice have failed.

The evidence demonstrates that when those who wish to stand are provided with designated Safe Standing areas, the issue of standing in seated areas largely goes away. This benefits everyone.

In England and Wales, Safe Standing areas are permitted at rugby union and rugby league venues, as well as at speedway and horse racing events. Safe Standing is also allowed at football grounds outside the top two divisions, subject to the stringent standards laid down in the Government's Green Guide. The idea that the safety of an stadium depends on the type and quality of event happening on the pitch is absurd. This anomoly can best be tackled by removing section 11.1.

Why is this idea important?

Section 11.1 of the Football Spectators Act provides the Secretary of State with the power to stipulate that certain football grounds are all-seated, a power that is currently applied to the top two divisions. This section should be repealed.

Practical experience shows that the all-seater rules are unenforceable. Every week, thousands of people stand in front of their seats for the duration of the game. Many who would like to sit down are unable to use their seats, as they find their view blocked. Varied and repeated attempts to tackle this practice have failed.

The evidence demonstrates that when those who wish to stand are provided with designated Safe Standing areas, the issue of standing in seated areas largely goes away. This benefits everyone.

In England and Wales, Safe Standing areas are permitted at rugby union and rugby league venues, as well as at speedway and horse racing events. Safe Standing is also allowed at football grounds outside the top two divisions, subject to the stringent standards laid down in the Government's Green Guide. The idea that the safety of an stadium depends on the type and quality of event happening on the pitch is absurd. This anomoly can best be tackled by removing section 11.1.

Abolish Stupid Restrictions on Pole Dancers

In a bizarre burst of Sir Humphryism, councils up and down the country have introduced huge rule books saying what pole dancers can and cannot do. In many council areas there are actual licence conditions banning a dancer from getting closer than 3 feet from their cutomer. How is this enforced? Is the dancer issued with a tape measure? If the customer is sat down is this measured from his face, hands or knees? If measured from his kneeds his face will be well over 4 feet away.

Other rules prevent dancers from flicking their hair.

Seriously, is this good use of the law?

Armies of public sector workers draft these rules, then write them into every licence, and even run training sessions! Club owners have to teach casual labouring staff – the dancers – every single rule, even if they only turn up once, because breaking the rules just once can lead to closure.

The more complex and lengthy rules are, the higher the risk that people will forget bits and misunderstand others.

Only one rule is required, and that is "No genital contact".

Why is this idea important?

In a bizarre burst of Sir Humphryism, councils up and down the country have introduced huge rule books saying what pole dancers can and cannot do. In many council areas there are actual licence conditions banning a dancer from getting closer than 3 feet from their cutomer. How is this enforced? Is the dancer issued with a tape measure? If the customer is sat down is this measured from his face, hands or knees? If measured from his kneeds his face will be well over 4 feet away.

Other rules prevent dancers from flicking their hair.

Seriously, is this good use of the law?

Armies of public sector workers draft these rules, then write them into every licence, and even run training sessions! Club owners have to teach casual labouring staff – the dancers – every single rule, even if they only turn up once, because breaking the rules just once can lead to closure.

The more complex and lengthy rules are, the higher the risk that people will forget bits and misunderstand others.

Only one rule is required, and that is "No genital contact".

Ofsted regulations on children’s summer camps

Ofsted states that a child under 5 years old can only attend a summer camp for a maximum of 4 hours a day although it compulsory for a child of 4 years of age on  1st September  to attend school full time i.e. 7 hours per day. 

my daughter was 4 on 20 August so has spent the last year at school but isn't allowed to attend a weeks summer camp at her school for a full day with friends in her class. this is ridiculous legislation and should be repealed.

Why is this idea important?

Ofsted states that a child under 5 years old can only attend a summer camp for a maximum of 4 hours a day although it compulsory for a child of 4 years of age on  1st September  to attend school full time i.e. 7 hours per day. 

my daughter was 4 on 20 August so has spent the last year at school but isn't allowed to attend a weeks summer camp at her school for a full day with friends in her class. this is ridiculous legislation and should be repealed.