Decriminalise non-violent and non-serious offences

Parliament should be the sole arbiter of what's deemed serious or violent, as these terms are too often misapplied. Convert all offences from criminal to civil offences provided they're neither violent nor serious, and if in doubt, place the onus on the CPS to make judgements in grey cases.

Why is this idea important?

Parliament should be the sole arbiter of what's deemed serious or violent, as these terms are too often misapplied. Convert all offences from criminal to civil offences provided they're neither violent nor serious, and if in doubt, place the onus on the CPS to make judgements in grey cases.

Simplify Categorisation of Driving Offences

The myriad of driving offences and the application of, sometimes inappropriate speed limits is hugely irritating to the general public.

 

Research has shown that speeding alone is not the cause of accidents – dangerous or distracted driving is. There is nothing dangerous about driving at 120 mph at 2 am on a completely empty motorway. On the other hand, it might well be dangerous to drive at 15mph on a very crowded High Street with a school emptying it's tiny charges onto it at 3.15 pm.

 

I suggest we have two categories for driving offences and no legal speed limits (speed recommendations, yes). The two categories would be "Driving without due care and attention" and "Dangerous driving". Inappropriate speed would be punishable (depending on the circumstances) as would tailgating, risky over-taking, road-rage and various other offences which are not always, currently, considered punishable. The sanctions could be wider in range than they currently are, again, depending on the severity of the offence, implemented instantly.

 

This would mean that people have the responsibility to drive sensibly and carefully vested in themselves and their own judgement. It would also entail the necessity for common-sense policing of the roads where safety is the criterion for penalising drivers.

Why is this idea important?

The myriad of driving offences and the application of, sometimes inappropriate speed limits is hugely irritating to the general public.

 

Research has shown that speeding alone is not the cause of accidents – dangerous or distracted driving is. There is nothing dangerous about driving at 120 mph at 2 am on a completely empty motorway. On the other hand, it might well be dangerous to drive at 15mph on a very crowded High Street with a school emptying it's tiny charges onto it at 3.15 pm.

 

I suggest we have two categories for driving offences and no legal speed limits (speed recommendations, yes). The two categories would be "Driving without due care and attention" and "Dangerous driving". Inappropriate speed would be punishable (depending on the circumstances) as would tailgating, risky over-taking, road-rage and various other offences which are not always, currently, considered punishable. The sanctions could be wider in range than they currently are, again, depending on the severity of the offence, implemented instantly.

 

This would mean that people have the responsibility to drive sensibly and carefully vested in themselves and their own judgement. It would also entail the necessity for common-sense policing of the roads where safety is the criterion for penalising drivers.

Upgrading selected summary offenses

Changing the following offenses from summary offenses to the very least Either way offenses;

  1. Common assault and battery – Criminal Justice Act 1988 Sec 39
  2. Causing intentional harassment, alarm or distress – Public Order Act 1986 Sec 4A
  3. Fear or provocation of violence – Public Order Act 1986 Sec 4
  4. Assault on a constable – Police Act 1996 Sec 89(1)

Why is this idea important?

Changing the following offenses from summary offenses to the very least Either way offenses;

  1. Common assault and battery – Criminal Justice Act 1988 Sec 39
  2. Causing intentional harassment, alarm or distress – Public Order Act 1986 Sec 4A
  3. Fear or provocation of violence – Public Order Act 1986 Sec 4
  4. Assault on a constable – Police Act 1996 Sec 89(1)