Switch the speed-limits on roads to metric ASAP. Delaying is starting to cost money…

It's well overdue that an "officially metric" country such as ours should demonstrate that offical line by changing the existing out-of-date road signs to metric. Most British drivers have been 100% educated in metric, and everyone's used to sports events using metric measurements for everything.

It is possibly not obvious that delaying any further on the speed-limits issue is actually a direct problem. However, is *is* a problem and here's why:

Councils all across the country are installing more and more radar-operated speed-warning signs as a technique for encouraging motorists to slow down where appropriate. ( I have no problem with that, it's a far better method than making criminals of perfectly good people who just happen to be looking out of the windscreen at the road rather than fixating on what their speedo says! )

However – these radar-triggered signs are in many cases physically built with arrays of LEDs that form the shape of a red roundel with "30" or "20" written inside just like the fixed speed-linit signs. And therein lies the problem.

When the inevitable switch to metric road signs does happen, those signs are going to need to be rebuilt. It's likely not to be the sort of thing that can be done by a council road gang at the side of the road. The signs will probably need to be de-mounted, taken back to the depot, changed, and then re-fitted. The "changed" bit might even require the sign to be sent back to the manufacturer.

This is going to cost MONEY. The longer we leave the switchover to km/h the worse it will get.

So the claim of this thread is – please repeal the out-of-date requirements of the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions that are forcing the use of miles and miles-per-hour on our signs, and join the rest of the world using km and km/h.

The UK does have a land border with another country (Eire) that already uses km/h on its signs. You get to drive faster on de-limited Irish roads too because 120km/h is faster than 70mph.

Why is this idea important?

It's well overdue that an "officially metric" country such as ours should demonstrate that offical line by changing the existing out-of-date road signs to metric. Most British drivers have been 100% educated in metric, and everyone's used to sports events using metric measurements for everything.

It is possibly not obvious that delaying any further on the speed-limits issue is actually a direct problem. However, is *is* a problem and here's why:

Councils all across the country are installing more and more radar-operated speed-warning signs as a technique for encouraging motorists to slow down where appropriate. ( I have no problem with that, it's a far better method than making criminals of perfectly good people who just happen to be looking out of the windscreen at the road rather than fixating on what their speedo says! )

However – these radar-triggered signs are in many cases physically built with arrays of LEDs that form the shape of a red roundel with "30" or "20" written inside just like the fixed speed-linit signs. And therein lies the problem.

When the inevitable switch to metric road signs does happen, those signs are going to need to be rebuilt. It's likely not to be the sort of thing that can be done by a council road gang at the side of the road. The signs will probably need to be de-mounted, taken back to the depot, changed, and then re-fitted. The "changed" bit might even require the sign to be sent back to the manufacturer.

This is going to cost MONEY. The longer we leave the switchover to km/h the worse it will get.

So the claim of this thread is – please repeal the out-of-date requirements of the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions that are forcing the use of miles and miles-per-hour on our signs, and join the rest of the world using km and km/h.

The UK does have a land border with another country (Eire) that already uses km/h on its signs. You get to drive faster on de-limited Irish roads too because 120km/h is faster than 70mph.

Switch the white-on-brown “tourism” roadsigns to metric

Currently, the familiar white-on-brown roadsigns providing directions to tourist attractions are treated as any other roadsign and their formats are strictly governed by the Traffic Signs Regualtions and General Directions act (of 2002). That's OK in itself, but this forces those signs to conform with the other rules in TSRGD which enforce the use of miles and yards onto all signs.

Now, these are signs that are predominantly intended for tourists. A large number of these tourists will be from outside the UK and won't be familiar with miles or yards (as indeed are our own children until they are about 9 or 10 years old).

Make Britain more friendly for our visitors, and change the tourist signs to metric. Don't waste money requiring the old ones to be converted (though that would be an option). Just make it a requirement that all new ones are in metric and that when old ones need replacing that the replacement shall be in metric.

Just metric, not both systems. That would clutter the signs horribly especially in Wales where the current signs have to be translated. ( Welsh for 'mile' is 'milltir' and 'yards' is 'llath'. ) The great advantage of metric in Wales is that 'km' is 'km' and doesn't need to be translated. Other bits may do, but at least the distances would only appear once, and be clearly understood by all.

Why is this idea important?

Currently, the familiar white-on-brown roadsigns providing directions to tourist attractions are treated as any other roadsign and their formats are strictly governed by the Traffic Signs Regualtions and General Directions act (of 2002). That's OK in itself, but this forces those signs to conform with the other rules in TSRGD which enforce the use of miles and yards onto all signs.

Now, these are signs that are predominantly intended for tourists. A large number of these tourists will be from outside the UK and won't be familiar with miles or yards (as indeed are our own children until they are about 9 or 10 years old).

Make Britain more friendly for our visitors, and change the tourist signs to metric. Don't waste money requiring the old ones to be converted (though that would be an option). Just make it a requirement that all new ones are in metric and that when old ones need replacing that the replacement shall be in metric.

Just metric, not both systems. That would clutter the signs horribly especially in Wales where the current signs have to be translated. ( Welsh for 'mile' is 'milltir' and 'yards' is 'llath'. ) The great advantage of metric in Wales is that 'km' is 'km' and doesn't need to be translated. Other bits may do, but at least the distances would only appear once, and be clearly understood by all.

Stop Painting Roads

There are too many regulations governing the marking of roads.  Every different road use needs a different marking and each needs a sign to tell us what it means – and these markings and signs are too frequent, and cost a huge amount to implement.

 

Why is this idea important?

There are too many regulations governing the marking of roads.  Every different road use needs a different marking and each needs a sign to tell us what it means – and these markings and signs are too frequent, and cost a huge amount to implement.

 

Allow metres rather than yards on distance signs

At present, the Weights and Measures Act requires local authorities and others to use yards rather than metres in signs measuring distance (although this is not often enforced against private companies, local authorities and government agencies tend to follow the legal requirement).

The relevant sections of the Act should be repealed to permit (not force) the use of metres instead of yards, where local authorities and others responsible for signage think it is appropriate. 

Why is this idea important?

At present, the Weights and Measures Act requires local authorities and others to use yards rather than metres in signs measuring distance (although this is not often enforced against private companies, local authorities and government agencies tend to follow the legal requirement).

The relevant sections of the Act should be repealed to permit (not force) the use of metres instead of yards, where local authorities and others responsible for signage think it is appropriate.