Repeal the Obscene Publications Act of 1959 and 1964

The Obscene Publications Acts prohibit the production of material likely to "deprave and corrupt" those likely to view it. This is applied to all films being processed by the BBFC, especially pornography.

I would also like to see Section 63 of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 repealed as it prohibits  'extreme pornography' such as BDSM, bestiality and simulated rape – all of which can be produced with the consent of the participants.

Why is this idea important?

The Obscene Publications Acts prohibit the production of material likely to "deprave and corrupt" those likely to view it. This is applied to all films being processed by the BBFC, especially pornography.

I would also like to see Section 63 of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 repealed as it prohibits  'extreme pornography' such as BDSM, bestiality and simulated rape – all of which can be produced with the consent of the participants.

16 and 17 year olds & the Sexual Offences Act 2003

Repeal of Part 1, Section 45, Clauses 1 and 2, and related

This section extends the definition of "child" from the Protection of Children Act (1978) to cover persons of 16 and 17 years. This age group is thereby covered by child pornography laws in the aforementioned 1978 act and elsewhere. It is thusly illegal to make "indecent" images of 16 and 17 year olds (or indeed in most cases for 16 and 17 year olds to make such images of themselves.) [The term "indecent" is undefined in law.]

The main problem with this legislation is that it is logically and morally incompatible with the age of sexual consent being 16 years. A recording or depiction of a lawful act should not be unlawful; neither should persons who are legally recognised as sexual beings – and therefore adults in that regard – be prohibited from recording or depicting themselves, or consenting to be recorded or depicted, as sexual beings. While the motivation behind the extension of protection to 16 and 17 year olds was well-meaning, it does not make rational or moral sense that an image or recording of a person with whom one can legally have sexual intercourse should be legally defined as "child pornography". The protection of children and young people from exploitation is paramount to a just and decent society; however, the laws by which we live our lives should also make a modicum of sense. This inconsistency in the legislation could alternatively be rectified equally well by raising the age of sexual consent to 18.

Why is this idea important?

Repeal of Part 1, Section 45, Clauses 1 and 2, and related

This section extends the definition of "child" from the Protection of Children Act (1978) to cover persons of 16 and 17 years. This age group is thereby covered by child pornography laws in the aforementioned 1978 act and elsewhere. It is thusly illegal to make "indecent" images of 16 and 17 year olds (or indeed in most cases for 16 and 17 year olds to make such images of themselves.) [The term "indecent" is undefined in law.]

The main problem with this legislation is that it is logically and morally incompatible with the age of sexual consent being 16 years. A recording or depiction of a lawful act should not be unlawful; neither should persons who are legally recognised as sexual beings – and therefore adults in that regard – be prohibited from recording or depicting themselves, or consenting to be recorded or depicted, as sexual beings. While the motivation behind the extension of protection to 16 and 17 year olds was well-meaning, it does not make rational or moral sense that an image or recording of a person with whom one can legally have sexual intercourse should be legally defined as "child pornography". The protection of children and young people from exploitation is paramount to a just and decent society; however, the laws by which we live our lives should also make a modicum of sense. This inconsistency in the legislation could alternatively be rectified equally well by raising the age of sexual consent to 18.

Legalise but regulate Brothels

Make Brothels registered businesses. Ultimately provide prostitutes the ability to work safely. Give Prostitutes the chance to work and pay income taxes even VAT for their services. Many sex workers work from a Brothel which is currently illegal. In turn they find themselves in a position where they feel excluded from our financial systems. Many of these high earners never declare their income. Prostitution laws are far more evolved across Europe. We should be the country leading the field.

Why is this idea important?

Make Brothels registered businesses. Ultimately provide prostitutes the ability to work safely. Give Prostitutes the chance to work and pay income taxes even VAT for their services. Many sex workers work from a Brothel which is currently illegal. In turn they find themselves in a position where they feel excluded from our financial systems. Many of these high earners never declare their income. Prostitution laws are far more evolved across Europe. We should be the country leading the field.

amend the Offences Against the Person Act 1861

This act was brought in at a time when even the slightest injuries could cause death through infection. In the famous "Spanner" case (R v Brown) In 1989 it was used to prosecute and imprison consenting adults because they engaged in BDSM (Bondage/Discipline/Slave/Master) sex which caused non-serious injuries.

A Law Commission Report (CONSENT IN SEX OFFENCES) recommended that the law on assault be brought up to date with new definitions of categories of assault.

The Law Commission's recommendations should be put into practice.

Why is this idea important?

This act was brought in at a time when even the slightest injuries could cause death through infection. In the famous "Spanner" case (R v Brown) In 1989 it was used to prosecute and imprison consenting adults because they engaged in BDSM (Bondage/Discipline/Slave/Master) sex which caused non-serious injuries.

A Law Commission Report (CONSENT IN SEX OFFENCES) recommended that the law on assault be brought up to date with new definitions of categories of assault.

The Law Commission's recommendations should be put into practice.

Legalise Prostitution

Duplicate the treatment of prostitutes that Australia and some other 1st world countries use by legalising prostitution and giving them screening for STIs, protecting them from pimps and drug dealers, and in return taxing their income.

Why is this idea important?

Duplicate the treatment of prostitutes that Australia and some other 1st world countries use by legalising prostitution and giving them screening for STIs, protecting them from pimps and drug dealers, and in return taxing their income.

Repeal laws on drawn pornography

Repeal the laws on drawn pornography as it is a victimless crime.

The government only this year had the absurd idea that drawings can be underage, now the criminal justice system will not only have to waste money enforcing this law but also discuss whether a drawing is sexually explicit.

These laws not only restricts freedom of expression by many artists but it also means a step toward the government dictating the sexual practices of the general public.

Why is this idea important?

Repeal the laws on drawn pornography as it is a victimless crime.

The government only this year had the absurd idea that drawings can be underage, now the criminal justice system will not only have to waste money enforcing this law but also discuss whether a drawing is sexually explicit.

These laws not only restricts freedom of expression by many artists but it also means a step toward the government dictating the sexual practices of the general public.

Prostitution: decriminalise

Decriminalise most prostitution. Allow licensed, regulated premises to operate a service. This would remove much of the incentive for the current sex-worker slave trade. It would provide prostitutes and their clients with a measure of protection and, since the whole service would be legal, it would provide revenue in the form of taxes.

In order to protect prostitutes, their clients and the general public I'd make it illegal to offer and use the service outside licensed premises.

Why is this idea important?

Decriminalise most prostitution. Allow licensed, regulated premises to operate a service. This would remove much of the incentive for the current sex-worker slave trade. It would provide prostitutes and their clients with a measure of protection and, since the whole service would be legal, it would provide revenue in the form of taxes.

In order to protect prostitutes, their clients and the general public I'd make it illegal to offer and use the service outside licensed premises.

Naked Body Scanners At Airports

I would like all Naked Airport body scanners to be changed so that the naked image of a person is not viewed by any airport worker. Britain is the only country in the world were you must comply with a digital strip search. If you refuse you will loose your holiday and all the money you spent on it. You will also be barred from flying for life so the pressure is on the person to get completely naked in front of strangers. Most people think the scan is like an x-ray. If the public only knew it was a detailed naked image and that  any part of the body can be zoomed in on and viewed in great detail they would be horrified and refuse to fly.

They must all be changed to a human stick figure image which highlights an area of interest ie: objects that haven’t been removed and placed on a tray for the security guard to view.

As we all know if you are going through a metal detector you would take out all of your belongings and place them on the tray for the guard to view. If some one is trying to smuggle something through they would keep it on their person. If it isn’t metal like plastic explosives then a metal detector wouldn’t detect this but a scanner would easily show a body of mass that needs further investigation. These machines are a valuable tool in catching a would be terrorist or drug runner but why should the public be forced to expose themselves nude for anyone to see at an airport when the technology is available to protect the decency and privacy of people who really want to fly but feel that a person of the opposite sex seeing them naked is more than they are willing to sacrifice.

Manchester airport is trialling this technology at the moment for the public’s privacy. If this isn’t rolled out across the board then it is a gross invasion of privacy of every individual that fly’s.

Why is this idea important?

I would like all Naked Airport body scanners to be changed so that the naked image of a person is not viewed by any airport worker. Britain is the only country in the world were you must comply with a digital strip search. If you refuse you will loose your holiday and all the money you spent on it. You will also be barred from flying for life so the pressure is on the person to get completely naked in front of strangers. Most people think the scan is like an x-ray. If the public only knew it was a detailed naked image and that  any part of the body can be zoomed in on and viewed in great detail they would be horrified and refuse to fly.

They must all be changed to a human stick figure image which highlights an area of interest ie: objects that haven’t been removed and placed on a tray for the security guard to view.

As we all know if you are going through a metal detector you would take out all of your belongings and place them on the tray for the guard to view. If some one is trying to smuggle something through they would keep it on their person. If it isn’t metal like plastic explosives then a metal detector wouldn’t detect this but a scanner would easily show a body of mass that needs further investigation. These machines are a valuable tool in catching a would be terrorist or drug runner but why should the public be forced to expose themselves nude for anyone to see at an airport when the technology is available to protect the decency and privacy of people who really want to fly but feel that a person of the opposite sex seeing them naked is more than they are willing to sacrifice.

Manchester airport is trialling this technology at the moment for the public’s privacy. If this isn’t rolled out across the board then it is a gross invasion of privacy of every individual that fly’s.

Change Section 63 of Criminal Justice Act

In the current climate our sexual freedom is under attack as never before. Successive pieces of the previous Government's legislation have succeeded in criminalising the normal sexual activity of hundreds of thousands of adult citizens based on flimsy evidence and a general feeling of distaste.

It is widely agreed and accepted that consenting activities between adults are just that, and that it is not the business of the state to legislate on grounds of taste. The freedom to express oneself sexually without fear of prejudice is a basic civil liberty.

Why is this idea important?

In the current climate our sexual freedom is under attack as never before. Successive pieces of the previous Government's legislation have succeeded in criminalising the normal sexual activity of hundreds of thousands of adult citizens based on flimsy evidence and a general feeling of distaste.

It is widely agreed and accepted that consenting activities between adults are just that, and that it is not the business of the state to legislate on grounds of taste. The freedom to express oneself sexually without fear of prejudice is a basic civil liberty.

Section 63 of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008

This law is unessessary – we already have laws to prevent people committing acts of sexual violence towards others.  This law prevents people making or viewing a record of acts which occur between consenting adults. 

Why is this idea important?

This law is unessessary – we already have laws to prevent people committing acts of sexual violence towards others.  This law prevents people making or viewing a record of acts which occur between consenting adults.