Abolish the ‘Challenge 21/25’ requirements when buying alcohol

I would like to propose that the 'challenge 21' or in some cases 'challenge 25' requirements when purchasing alcohol be repealed.

 

Currently, the legal age to purchase alcohol in a shop is 18. However, the law requires that employees challenge anyone who appears to be under 21, or 25 in some cases, to provide ID before they can purchase alcohol. 

These regulations lead to a creeping criminalisation of people's legal right to enjoy an alcoholic drink, and foster a culture of suspicion and mistrust by enshrining in law the assumption that a customer is attempting to purchase alcohol illegally, and requiring them to prove otherwise. 

The poorly thought out nature of this law has lead to its over-zealous application in numerous instances – there have been no shortage of reports in the media of people who are clearly and unquestionably over 18 – in some cases quite evidently of pensionable age – being denied alcohol because they do not have, or cannot provide, a passport, driving licence or the one specific type of ID card permitted; and even cases where parents accompanied on a shopping trip by their children have been denied their purchase, despite showing the required ID, on the pretext that the children might drink the alcohol!

In addition, the law criminalises employers and employees who fail to check a customer's ID.

Why is this idea important?

I would like to propose that the 'challenge 21' or in some cases 'challenge 25' requirements when purchasing alcohol be repealed.

 

Currently, the legal age to purchase alcohol in a shop is 18. However, the law requires that employees challenge anyone who appears to be under 21, or 25 in some cases, to provide ID before they can purchase alcohol. 

These regulations lead to a creeping criminalisation of people's legal right to enjoy an alcoholic drink, and foster a culture of suspicion and mistrust by enshrining in law the assumption that a customer is attempting to purchase alcohol illegally, and requiring them to prove otherwise. 

The poorly thought out nature of this law has lead to its over-zealous application in numerous instances – there have been no shortage of reports in the media of people who are clearly and unquestionably over 18 – in some cases quite evidently of pensionable age – being denied alcohol because they do not have, or cannot provide, a passport, driving licence or the one specific type of ID card permitted; and even cases where parents accompanied on a shopping trip by their children have been denied their purchase, despite showing the required ID, on the pretext that the children might drink the alcohol!

In addition, the law criminalises employers and employees who fail to check a customer's ID.

STOP TEACHING CHILDREN ABOUT SEX

No wonder we have the highest average of under age sex when my 14 year old nephew comes in from school and tells me he cant wait to have a go, and half the school is pregnant, the education system is ramming sex down there theoats, buzz bus outside where the ice cream van should be giving out free condoms…. what a world.

Why is this idea important?

No wonder we have the highest average of under age sex when my 14 year old nephew comes in from school and tells me he cant wait to have a go, and half the school is pregnant, the education system is ramming sex down there theoats, buzz bus outside where the ice cream van should be giving out free condoms…. what a world.

Reintroduce special licenses for premises to serve alcohol below the age limit

My (private) school had a social centre for the A-level students – nice, relaxed place, with a little dancefloor, a couple of pool tables, and a small bar. The school, I'm told, had obtained a special license that allowed it to serve alcohol to 17 year olds, which covered the majority of A-level students. It was really nice to be able to spend a day in class, and then go to the centre to relax and sit around having a couple of drinks; the whole thing was supervised by the teachers, and they'd quickly cut off anyone who'd had enough (I think the limit was usually around 3 cans of weak lager in a night).

Since leaving, I've heard that the license they held was revoked – because all such licenses have been scrapped. 

I propose the reintroduction of this kind of license.

Why is this idea important?

My (private) school had a social centre for the A-level students – nice, relaxed place, with a little dancefloor, a couple of pool tables, and a small bar. The school, I'm told, had obtained a special license that allowed it to serve alcohol to 17 year olds, which covered the majority of A-level students. It was really nice to be able to spend a day in class, and then go to the centre to relax and sit around having a couple of drinks; the whole thing was supervised by the teachers, and they'd quickly cut off anyone who'd had enough (I think the limit was usually around 3 cans of weak lager in a night).

Since leaving, I've heard that the license they held was revoked – because all such licenses have been scrapped. 

I propose the reintroduction of this kind of license.

Underage Drinking Responsibility

I think that it is unfair that as a shop employee I can be held personally accountable for selling alcohol to anyone under the age of 18. Also that trading standards have been known to send people into the shop where I work that look well over the age of 18.

Currently we can pay an on-the-spot fine or take the matter to court. If we take the matter to court you may be issued with a £1,000 fine and a Criminal Record.

I believe that it should always be the business that it held responsible, or that the appeals process should be made fairer on shop-workers. I am law abiding I have 3 jobs and I don't have the choice of what department to work on in my Supermarket. I am a checkout worker and think that this is one of the more un-fair laws that exist.

I challenge when I think an individual looks under the age of 25, however even that is sometimes hard to determine and when you ask someone there age and it turns out their 30 then the situation can turn intimidating.

So please think about the people that sell you your weekly shopping and are put under this additional appeals process pressure and change it.

Why is this idea important?

I think that it is unfair that as a shop employee I can be held personally accountable for selling alcohol to anyone under the age of 18. Also that trading standards have been known to send people into the shop where I work that look well over the age of 18.

Currently we can pay an on-the-spot fine or take the matter to court. If we take the matter to court you may be issued with a £1,000 fine and a Criminal Record.

I believe that it should always be the business that it held responsible, or that the appeals process should be made fairer on shop-workers. I am law abiding I have 3 jobs and I don't have the choice of what department to work on in my Supermarket. I am a checkout worker and think that this is one of the more un-fair laws that exist.

I challenge when I think an individual looks under the age of 25, however even that is sometimes hard to determine and when you ask someone there age and it turns out their 30 then the situation can turn intimidating.

So please think about the people that sell you your weekly shopping and are put under this additional appeals process pressure and change it.

Remove Child Benefit and Pregnancy Grant for under 21’s

End the financial incentives for young people to get pregnant early in life by axing the pregnancy grant and restricting Child Benefit to those over the age of 21. This will encourage people to think of a career, stay in education, learn a trade or otherwise contribut to society.

Why is this idea important?

End the financial incentives for young people to get pregnant early in life by axing the pregnancy grant and restricting Child Benefit to those over the age of 21. This will encourage people to think of a career, stay in education, learn a trade or otherwise contribut to society.

Legalise non alcoholic beverages such as non alcoholic cider

I think that people under the age of18 should be allowed to buy non alcoholic bevereges like cider or beer, and other 'alcoholic' products like cooking wine or something that has been cooked in wine without the need of ID

Why is this idea important?

I think that people under the age of18 should be allowed to buy non alcoholic bevereges like cider or beer, and other 'alcoholic' products like cooking wine or something that has been cooked in wine without the need of ID